Photograph of Alison Davis Rabosky

Alison Davis Rabosky

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Our research group studies how and why an organism’s traits (“phenotypes”) evolve in natural populations. Explaining the mechanisms that generate and regulate patterns of phenotypic diversity is a major goal of evolutionary biology: why do we see rapid shifts to strikingly new and distinct character states, and how stable are these evolutionary transitions across space and time? To answer these questions, we generate and analyze high-throughput “big data” on both genomes and phenotypes across the 18,000 species of reptiles and amphibians across the globe. Then, we use the statistical tools of phylogenetic comparative analysis, geometric morphometrics of 3D anatomy generated from CT scans, and genome annotation and comparative transcriptomics to understand the integrated trait correlations that create complex phenotypes. Currently, we are using machine learning and neural networks to study the color patterns of animals vouchered into biodiversity collections and test hypotheses about the ecological causes and evolutionary consequences of phenotypic innovation. We are especially passionate about the effective and accurate visualization of large-scale multidimensional datasets, and we prioritize training in both best practices and new innovations in quantitative data display.

Photograph of Nate Sanders

Nate Sanders

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My research interests are broad, but generally center on the causes and consequences of biodiversity loss at local, regional, and global scales with an explicit focus on global change drivers. Our work has been published in Science, Nature, Science Advances, Global Change Biology, PNAS, AREES, TREE, and Ecology Letters among other journals. We are especially interested in using AI and machine learning to explore broad-scale patterns of biodiversity and phenotypic variation, mostly in ants.

Picture of Thomas Schwarz

Thomas A. Schwarz

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Professor Schwarz is an experimental particle physicist who has performed research in astro-particle physics, collider physics, as well as in accelerator physics and RF engineering. His current research focuses on discovering new physics in high-energy collisions with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. His particular focus is in precision measurements of properties of the Higgs Boson and searching for new associated physics using advanced AI and machine learning techniques.

Jordan Mckay

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He/Him

Jordan McKay is a Project Associate Manager at MIDAS. An Ann Arbor native, Jordan received his Bachelors in Computer Science from University of Michigan, and his Masters in Information at the University of Michigan School of Information. Outside of business hours, Jordan also works as a conductor, concert pianist, and Music Director with a number of organizations in the Ann Arbor area.

In addition to his duties administrating the day-to-day operations for MIDAS, its website, its events, and its part-time staff, Jordan is an engaged member of the data science community. Jordan is a determined advocate for ethical AI, data sovereignty, accessibility, digital privacy, and humane information system design, and is proud to be a member of a team that is working to make data a force for good in our society.

Hamid Ghanbari

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My research focuses on using digital health solutions, signal processing, machine learning and ecological momentary assessment to understand the physiological and psychological determinants of symptoms in patients with atrial fibrillation. I am building a research framework for rich data collection using smartphone apps, medical records and wearable sensors. I believe that creating a multidimensional dataset to study atrial fibrillation will yield important insights and serve as model for studying all chronic medical conditions.

Zheng Song

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I received my second PhD in Computer Science (with a focus on distributed systems and software engineering) from Virginia Tech USA in 2020, and the first PhD (with a focus on wireless networking and mobile computing) from Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications China in 2015. I received the Best Paper Award from IEEE International Conference on Edge Computing in 2019. My ongoing research projects include measuring the data quality of web services and using federated learning to improve indoor localization accuracy.

Matias del Campo

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The goal of this project is the creation of a crucial building block of the research on AI and Architecture – a database of 3D models necessary to successfully run Artificial Neural Networks in 3D. This database is part of the first stepping-stones for the research at the AR2IL (Architecture and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory), an interdisciplinary Laboratory between Architecture (represented by Taubman College of Architecture of Urban Planning), Michigan Robotics, and the CS Department of the University of Michigan. A Laboratory dedicated to research specializing in the development of applications of Artificial Intelligence in the field of Architecture and Urban Planning. This area of inquiry has experienced an explosive growth in recent years (triggered in part by research conducted at UoM), as evidenced for example by the growth in papers dedicated to AI applications in architecture, as well as in the investment of the industry in this area. The research funded by this proposal would secure the leading position of Taubman College and the University of Michigan in the field of AI and Architecture. This proposal would also address the current lack of 3D databases that are specifically designed for Architecture applications.

The project “Generali Center’ presents itself as an experiment in the combination of Machine Learning processes capable of learning the salient features of a specific architecture style – in this case, Brutalism- in order to generatively perform interpolations between the data points of the provided dataset. These images serve as the basis of a pixel projection approach that results in a 3D model.

Stefanus Jasin

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My research focus the application and development of new algorithms for solving complex business analytics problems. Applications vary from revenue management, dynamic pricing, marketing analytics, to retail logistics. In terms of methodology, I use a combination of operations research and machine learning/online optimization techniques.