Scott Peltier

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My research deals with functional MRI data acquisition and analysis. My areas of interest include brain network connectivity; multimodal imaging; real-time fMRI neurofeedback; and the use of multivariate and data-driven analysis techniques, including machine learning.

Benjamin Goldstein

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Benjamin Goldstein is Assistant Professor of Environment and Sustainability and head of the Sustainable Urban-Rural Futures (SURF) lab. The SURF Lab (www.surf-lab.ca) studies and emphasizes urban sustainability at multiple scales. Through his work at the SURF Lab, Benjamin helps understand how urban processes and urban form drive the consumption of materials and energy in cities and produce environmental change inside and outside cities. He develops methods and tools to quantify the scale of these changes and the locations where they occur using life cycle assessment, input-output analysis, geospatial data, and approaches from data science. Benjamin is particularly interested in combining quantitative methods with theory rooted in social science to explore multiple dimensions of sustainability and address issues of distributive justice. His topical foci include urban food systems (esp. urban agriculture), agri-commodities, residual resource engineering, global supply chains, sustainable production and consumption, and energy systems.

David Kwabi

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We study and develop electrochemical devices containing organic materials for applications in grid energy storage and chemical separations (e.g., CO2 capture and nitrogen recovery). A critical aspect of our work involves discerning the impact of chemical reactions as well as mass and charge transport processes on device-level performance metrics. To accomplish this goal, we often conduct spectroscopic measurements of electrochemical systems while they are in operation. We apply a variety of mathematical modeling techniques to the spectroscopic data, such as multivariate curve resolution and Bayesian inference/model selection, to glean useful information about molecular transformation mechanisms and kinetics. These insights are informing closed-loop discovery of new and better-performing materials.

Carol Menassa

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My group’s research focuses on understanding and modeling the interconnections between human experience and the built environment. We design autonomous systems that support wellbeing, safety and productivity of office and construction workers, and provides them opportunities for lifelong learning and upskilling. In all research projects, we work hard to ensure that the results are inclusive and benefit people of different abilities in their daily activities and empower them for nontraditional careers.

Angela Violi

Angela Violi

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The Violi Lab carries out cross-disciplinary research at the intersection of nanoscience and data science. By integrating machine learning techniques with molecular simulations, the team strives to unravel fundamental scientific principles while tackling practical problems in material science, healthcare, and environmental sustainability. Their methodological toolkit encompasses various cutting-edge approaches: active learning and Bayesian experimental design to improve sample efficiency; advanced gradient boosting techniques for predictive modeling; specialized neural networks to decode protein-nanoparticle interactions; and Lasso-like algorithms for feature selection and regularization. Through this integrated approach, the lab aims to make significant contributions to both scientific understanding and technological innovation.

VAN HAI BUI

Van Hai Bui

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Dr. Bui’s research focuses on the operation and control of power and energy systems. We develop energy management systems aimed at optimizing the entire system’s operation to minimize operation costs, enhance system reliability, and improve system resiliency in both normal and emergency operation modes. Recently, the high penetration of distributed energy resources (DERs), including photovoltaics, wind turbines, and controllable distributed generators, in modern power systems has introduced numerous sources of uncertainty, making the operation and control of power systems significantly challenging. Conventional optimization methods often struggle to handle the high uncertainty of DER outputs. With the rapid development of AI/ML algorithms and their wide applications in the engineering domain, these techniques offer potential solutions for operating and controlling power systems. Our research group also investigates the state-of-the-art models in ML, such as deep learning, deep reinforcement learning, and physics-informed graph neural networks, and their applications in power and energy systems.

Cyrus Omar

Cyrus Omar

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I lead the Future of Programming Lab (FP Lab), where we design modern user interfaces for modern programming languages. Much of how we program today is rooted in tools designed 40+ years ago, e.g. how we enter code (using simple text editing, which leads to profligate parse errors), how we validate code (using tests or impoverished type systems), how we explore code (in a slow, batched, textual manner), how we communicate change (by throwing away the edits we performed and forcing diff algorithms to guess what we did), and so on. My lab develops new programming language and editor mechanisms, starting from theoretical foundations in mathematics and building up to human interfaces.

Integrating live GUIs into programs with holes

Integrating live GUIs into programs with holes

Johanna Mathieu

Johanna Mathieu

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My research focuses on ways to reduce the environmental impact, cost, and inefficiency of electric power systems via new operational and control strategies. I am particularly interested in developing new methods to actively engage distributed flexible resources such as energy storage, electric loads, and distributed renewable resources in power system operation. This is especially important in power systems with high penetrations of intermittent renewable energy resources such as wind and solar. In my work, I use methods from a variety of fields including control systems and optimization. I also use engineering methods to inform energy policy.

Alauddin Ahmed

Alauddin Ahmed

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My core research expertise involves developing and employing a wide array of computational methods to discover, design, and characterize materials and systems that address critical challenges in energy and the environment. These methods span from stochastic techniques to molecular dynamics, density functional theory, quantum chemistry, and data science. Beyond contributing fundamental design principles for high-performing materials, my research has led to the discovery of record-breaking materials for hydrogen storage, natural gas storage, and thermal energy storage, alongside creating open-access databases, machine learning models, and Python APIs.

In data science, I have uniquely contributed to feature engineering, compressed sensing, classical machine learning algorithms, symbolic regression, and interpretable ML. My approach to feature engineering involves crafting or identifying a concise set of meaningful features for developing interpretable machine learning models, diverging from traditional data reduction techniques that often disregard the underlying physics. Moreover, I have enabled the use of compressed sensing-based algorithms for developing symbolic regressions for large datasets, utilizing statistical sampling and high-throughput computing. I’ve also integrated symbolic regression and constrained optimization methods for the inverse design of materials/systems to meet specific performance metrics, and I continue to merge machine learning with fundamental physical laws to demystify material stability and instability under industrial conditions.

Looking forward, my ongoing and future projects include employing machine learning for causal inference in healthcare to understand and predict outcomes and integrating AI to conduct comprehensive environmental and social impact analyses of materials/systems via life cycle analysis. Furthermore, I am exploring quantum computing and machine learning to drive innovation and transform vehicle energy systems and manufacturing processes.

Uduak Inyang-Udoh

Uduak Inyang-Udoh

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My research seeks to exploit graph-based modeling theory and the tools of machine learning for efficient control of physical dynamical systems and control co-design in these systems. I am particularly interested in the design of graph-based machine/deep learning model structures that are compatible with basic physics, and using those model structures for real-time actions. Application of interest include advanced manufacturing, thermal and energy storage systems.