Melissa DeJonckheere

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Melissa DeJonckheere is an adolescent health researcher specializing in qualitative, participatory, and mixed methods research. She is Co-Director of the Mixed Methods Program at the University of Michigan and regularly teaches qualitative and mixed methods research to trainees of all levels. Her research focuses on psychosocial influences on health and well-being, particularly among adolescents with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Dr. DeJonckheere is also interested in improving access to and participation in academic research for youth, students, and trainees who have historically been excluded from science and research experiences. She is program director of MYHealth, a virtual, out-of-school research training program for high school students from southeast Michigan. She has used natural language processing to analyze text data in qualitative and mixed methods studies. She is currently pursuing research related to the use of natural language processing and AI in qualitative and mixed methods research in the health and social sciences.

Scott Peltier

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My research deals with functional MRI data acquisition and analysis. My areas of interest include brain network connectivity; multimodal imaging; real-time fMRI neurofeedback; and the use of multivariate and data-driven analysis techniques, including machine learning.

Mosharaf Chowdhury

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I am a computer scientist and an associate professor at CSE Michigan, where I lead the SymbioticLab (https://symbioticlab.org/). My research improves application performance and system efficiency of AI/ML and Big Data workloads with a recent focus on optimizing energy consumption and data privacy. I lead the ML Energy initiative (https://ml.energy/), a consortium of researchers focusing on understanding, controlling, and reducing AI/ML energy consumption. Over the course of my career, I have worked on a variety of networked and distributed systems. Recent major projects include Infiniswap, the first scalable memory disaggregation solution; Salus, the first software-only GPU sharing system for deep learning; FedScale, a scalable federated learning and analytics platform; and Zeus, the first GPU energy optimizer for AI. In the past, I invented the coflow abstraction for efficient distributed communication, and I am one of the original creators of Apache Spark. Thanks to my excellent collaborators, I have received many individual awards, fellowships, and paper awards from top venues like NSDI, OSDI, ATC, and MICRO.

Mohamed Abouelenien

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Mohamed Abouelenien’s areas of interest broadly cover data science topics, including applied machine learning, computer vision, and natural language processing. He established the Affective Computing and Multimodal Systems Lab (ACMS) which focuses on modeling human behavior and developing multimodal approaches for different applications. He has worked on a number of projects in these areas, including multimodal deception detection, multimodal sensing of drivers’ alertness levels and thermal discomfort, distraction detection, circadian rhythm modeling, emotion and stress analysis, automated scoring of students’ progression, sentiment analysis, ensemble learning, and image processing, among others. His research is funded by Ford Motor Company (Ford), Educational Testing Service (ETS), Toyota Research institute (TRI), and Procter & Gamble (P&G). Abouelenien has published in several top venues in IEEE, ACM, Springer, and SPIE. He also served as a reviewer for IEEE transactions and Elsevier journals and served as a program committee member for multiple international conferences.

Carol Menassa

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My group’s research focuses on understanding and modeling the interconnections between human experience and the built environment. We design autonomous systems that support wellbeing, safety and productivity of office and construction workers, and provides them opportunities for lifelong learning and upskilling. In all research projects, we work hard to ensure that the results are inclusive and benefit people of different abilities in their daily activities and empower them for nontraditional careers.

Zach Landis-Lewis

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My research focuses on the use and effectiveness of coaching and appreciation feedback in healthcare. I lead a team that develops a software-based precision feedback system to generate messages about performance to healthcare professionals and teams. My work involves the processing of performance data to detect signals of motivating information that can be delivered with algorithmically prioritized messages, to support performance improvement and sustainment. I lead the DISPLAY-Lab, which collaborates with researchers in a range of clinical and health-related domains, including biomedical informatics, implementation science, and human-centered design.

Allen Flynn

Allen Flynn

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I study medication prescription information and work on teams that create and evaluate applications of natural language processing to medication prescription information. The main thrust of my research in pharmacy informatics focuses on automating subtasks that pertain to medication prescribing by clinicians and medication prescription review by pharmacists. In addition, I work with the Knowledge Systems Lab in the Department of Learning Health Sciences to specify model repository requirements for making AI/ML models findable, accessible. interoperable, and reusable.

Fan Bu

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I am broadly interested in Bayesian and computational statistics for analyzing large-scale and complex data. I am particularly interested in spatio-temporal statistics, network inference, infectious disease models, and distributed learning. My methodological research has been motivated by applications in public health, observational healthcare studies, computational social science, and sports sciences.

I came from a math background but studied statistics in order to become a sports analyst (yes, Moneyball!). Throughout my PhD and postdoc training, I grew a strong appreciation for social sciences (how people behave and interact) and health sciences (how to provide high-quality healthcare for everyone). I see data science as the field to help us make sense of complex data that arise from our daily life and scientific endeavors, by building reliable and reproducible frameworks that transform data to evidence and then to scientific findings and decisions.

Xueding Wang

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My research focuses on novel biomedical imaging and treatment technologies, especially those involving light and ultrasound. I have extensive experience in medical system development, laser-tissue interactions, ultrasound tissue characterization, and adaptation of novel technologies to preclinical and clinical settings. A major part of my research is the development and clinical applications of photoacoustic imaging technology. By working on small-animal models and human patients, I have been seeking for clinical applications of this exciting technology to inflammatory arthritis, cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, eye diseases, osteoporosis, and brain disorders. Besides photoacoustic imaging, I am also interested in development of other medical imaging and treatment technologies, such as ionizing radiation induced acoustic imaging (iRAI) and photo-mediated ultrasound therapy (PUT). As the PI or co-Investigator of several NIH, NSF and DoD-funded research, I have successfully administered the projects, collaborated with other researchers, and produced high-quality publications. My contribution to biomedical optics and ultrasound up to now including over 160 peer-reviewed journal papers is a solid evidence of my creativity and ability to surmount the challenges in this field. I received the Sontag Foundation Fellow of the Arthritis National Research Foundation in 2005, the Distinguished Investigator Award of the Academy of Radiology Research in 2013, and was elected as the fellow of AIMBE in 2020 and the fellow of SPIE in 2022.

What is your most interesting project?

Automated photoacoustic imaging of inflammatory arthritis: Our research has demonstrated the unique capability of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) in diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. The new physiological and molecular biomarkers of synovitis presented by PAI can help in characterizing disease onset, progression, and response to therapy. Based on the endogenous optical contrast, PAI is extremely sensitive to the changes in hemodynamic properties in inflammatory joint tissues (e.g. enhanced flow and hypoxia). We are now conducting a preclinical research on patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis. The initial findings from this patient study are promising and suggest that the new optical contrast and physiological information introduced by PAI could greatly enhance the sensitivity and accuracy of diagnostic imaging and treatment monitoring of arthritis. Aiming at clinical translation, we are currently developing a point-of-care PAI and ultrasound dual-modality imaging system which is fully automated when powered by a robot and AI technologies.

Ionizing radiation acoustic imaging (iRAI) for personalized radiation therapy: iRAI, as a brand-new imaging technology relying on the detection of radiation-induced acoustic waves, allows online monitoring of radiation’s interactions with tissues during radiation therapy, providing real-time, adaptive feedback for cancer treatments. We are developing an iRAI volumetric imaging system that enables mapping of the three-dimensional (3D) radiation dose distribution in a complex clinical radiotherapy treatment. The feasibility of imaging temporal 3D dose accumulation was first validated in studies on phantoms and animal models. Then, real-time visualization of the 3D radiation dose delivered to a patient with liver metastases was accomplished with a clinical linear accelerator. These studies demonstrate the great potential of iRAI to monitor and quantify the 3D radiation dose deposition during treatment, potentially improving radiotherapy treatment efficacy using real-time adaptive treatment.

Describe your research journey.

2005 – 2007 Research Investigator, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan
2007 – 2008 Research Assistant Professor, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan
2008 – 2012 Assistant Professor, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School
2012 – 2014 Associate Professor, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan
2015 – 2018 Associate Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan
2018 – 2022 Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan
2022 – Now Jonathan Rubin Collegiate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan

What is the most significant scientific contribution you would like to make?

Develop and translate state-of-the-art medical imaging and treatment technologies.

What makes you excited about your data science and AI research?

Date science and AI is super important in developing state-of-the-art medical imaging and treatment technologies, especially for achieving personalized diagnosis and treatment ensuring largely improved patient outcome. As mentioned in the above, the automated imaging system for rheumatology/radiology clinic for arthritis imaging would be strongly powered by AI, which is crucial to achieve our goal of a “smart” ultrasound imaging platform.

Automated dual-modality ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system

Automated dual-modality ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system

Michael Sjoding

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Application of machine learning and artificial intelligence in healthcare, particularly in the field of pulmonary and critical care medicine. Deep learning applied to radiologic imaging studies. Physician and artificial intelligence interactions and collaborations. Identifying and addressing algorithmic bias.


Accomplishments and Awards