Laura Power

By |

I am an infectious disease and preventive medicine physician and my interests include studying the epidemiology of communicable diseases and and the practice of public health. I’m a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the School of Public Health and in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Medical School. My work also focuses on connecting physicians to public health practice; I serve as the Program Director for the Preventive Medicine Residency and I lead a certificate program in population health and health equity for physicians in training. I’m also an associate editor for the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. My research focuses on the epidemiology and prevention of infectious disease, including communicable diseases in the broader public health setting.

Joseph Eisenberg

By |

Dr. Eisenberg studies infectious disease epidemiology with a focus on waterborne pathogens. His expertise are in the areas of water sanitation and hygiene (WASH), quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) and disease transmission modeling. Dr. Eisenberg has a long-standing research platform in northern coastal Ecuador, examining how changes in the social and natural environments, mediated by road construction, affect the epidemiology of enteric pathogens. Specific studies focus on enteric pathogens, antimicrobial resistance, the microbiome and dengue. He is also The NIGMS consortium, Models of Infectious Disease Agent Study (MIDAS), to examine mechanisms of transmission and potential intervention and control of enteric pathogens through water and sanitation interventions.

Jana Hirschtick

By |

I am a social epidemiologist with expertise in data collection, analysis, and translation. My research is focused on quantifying health inequities at the individual, community, and national level and examining how policy and social factors impact these inequities. My experience has spanned academic, clinical, and community settings, providing me with a unique perspective on the value and need for epidemiologic research and dissemination in multiple contexts. My current work focuses on the health equity impact of tobacco product use as part of the University of Michigan Tobacco Center of Regulatory Science, the Center for the Assessment of Tobacco Regulations (CAsToR). I am examining sociodemographic inequities in polytobacco use (the use of multiple tobacco products) across multiple nationally representative datasets. I am also an active member of CAsToR’s Data Analysis and Dissemination (DAD) Core. Additionally, I am collaborating with colleagues in Chicago to disseminate findings from a community-level probability survey of 10 Chicago communities, of which I served as Co-PI while working at a hospital system in Chicago. We continue to publish on the unique survey process, sharing our community-driven approach to conducting research and disseminating findings in partnership with surveyed communities.

Nancy Fleischer

By |

Dr. Fleischer’s research focuses on how the broader socioeconomic and policy environments impact health disparities and the health of vulnerable populations, in the U.S. and around the world. Through this research, her group employs various analytic techniques to examine data at multiple levels (country-level, state-level, and neighborhood-level), emphasizing the role of structural influences on individual health. Her group applies advanced epidemiologic, statistical, and econometric methods to this research, including survey methodology, longitudinal data analysis, hierarchical modeling, causal inference, systems science, and difference-in-difference analysis. Dr. Fleischer leads two NCI-funded projects focused on the impact of tobacco control policies on health equity in the U.S.

Jon Zelner

By |

Jon Zelner, PhD, is Assistant Professor in the department of Epidemiology in the University of Michigan School of Public Health. Dr. Zelner holds a second appointment in the Center for Social Epidemiology and Population Health.

Dr. Zelner’s research is focused on using spatial analysis, social network analyisis and dynamic modeling to prevent infectious diseases, with a focus on tuberculosis and diarrheal disease. Jon is also interested in understanding how the social and biological causes of illness interact to generate observable patterns of disease in space and in social networks, across outcomes ranging from infection to mental illness.

 

A large spatial cluster of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) cases in Lima, Peru is highlighted in red. A key challenge in my work is understanding why these cases cluster in space: can social, spatial, and genetic data tell us where transmission is occurring and how to interrupt it?

A large spatial cluster of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) cases in Lima, Peru is highlighted in red. A key challenge in my work is understanding why these cases cluster in space: can social, spatial, and genetic data tell us where transmission is occurring and how to interrupt it?