Quan Nguyen

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My research focuses on the application of data science in educational research, so called learning analytics. I have experience analyzing educational data on a large-scale to understand a) how course design influence students’ learning behavior and b) how students form peer networks. My work involves using multiple educational data sources such as log-data in online learning environment, course information, students’ academic records, and location data gathered from campus WiFi networks. I am interested in network analysis, time-series analysis, and machine learning.

Akbar Waljee

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I use machine-learning techniques to implement decision support systems and tools that facilitate more personalized care for disease management and healthcare utilization to ultimately deliver efficient, effective, and equitable therapy for chronic diseases. To test and advance these general principles, I have built operational programs that are guiding—and improving—patient care in costly in low resource settings, including emerging countries.

Lei Ying

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His research is broadly in the interplay of complex stochastic systems and big-data, including large-scale communication/computing systems for big-data processing, private data marketplaces, and large-scale graph mining.

Ya’acov Ritov

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My main interest is theoretical statistics as implied to complex model from semiparametric to ultra high dimensional regression analysis. In particular the negative aspects of Bayesian and causal analysis as implemented in modern statistics.

An analysis of the position of SCOTUS judges.

Nancy Fleischer

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Dr. Fleischer’s research focuses on how the broader socioeconomic and policy environments impact health disparities and the health of vulnerable populations, in the U.S. and around the world. Through this research, her group employs various analytic techniques to examine data at multiple levels (country-level, state-level, and neighborhood-level), emphasizing the role of structural influences on individual health. Her group applies advanced epidemiologic, statistical, and econometric methods to this research, including survey methodology, longitudinal data analysis, hierarchical modeling, causal inference, systems science, and difference-in-difference analysis. Dr. Fleischer leads two NCI-funded projects focused on the impact of tobacco control policies on health equity in the U.S.

Zhixin (Jason) Liu

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My research focuses on quantitative modeling approaches that help business or nonprofit institutions make efficient operational decisions. My research addresses decisions that are made: 1) on either a single independent operation or multiple integrated operations, and 2) by either a single party or multiple parties, most likely different supply chain members. I am specifically interested in the allocation of resources over time and/or among different parties, which often involve scheduling, i.e., the allocation of resources over time to optimize certain objectives, capacity allocation, i.e., the allocation of production capacity from supplier to retailers in a supply chain setting, and pricing, i.e., the determination of selling price of certain products. When multiple parties are involved, decisions can be made either cooperatively or non-cooperatively. The methodologies used in my work include game theory, real analysis, optimization, approximation, simulation, and statistics.

Nicole Seiberlich

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My research involves developing novel data collection strategies and image reconstruction techniques for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. In order to accelerate data collection, we take advantage of features of MRI data, including sparsity, spatiotemporal correlations, and adherence to underlying physics; each of these properties can be leveraged to reduce the amount of data required to generate an image and thus speed up imaging time. We also seek to understand what image information is essential for radiologists in order to optimize MRI data collection and personalize the imaging protocol for each patient. We deploy machine learning algorithms and optimization techniques in each of these projects. In some of our work, we can generate the data that we need to train and test our algorithms using numerical simulations. In other portions, we seek to utilize clinical images, prospectively collected MRI data, or MRI protocol information in order to refine our techniques.

We seek to develop technologies like cardiac Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (cMRF), which can be used to efficiently collect multiple forms of information to distinguish healthy and diseased tissue using MRI. By using rapid methods like cMRF, quantitative data describing disease processes can be gathered quickly, enabling more and sicker patients can be assessed via MRI. These data, collected from many patients over time, can also be used to further refine MRI technologies for the assessment of specific diseases in a tailored, patient-specific manner.

Kathleen Sienko

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Age- and sensory-related deficits in balance function drastically impact quality of life and present long-term care challenges. Successful fall prevention programs include balance exercise regimes, designed to recover, retrain, or develop new sensorimotor strategies to facilitate functional mobility. Effective balance-training programs require frequent visits to the clinic and/or the supervision of a physical therapist; however, one-on-one guided training with a physical therapist is not scalable for long-term balance training preventative and therapeutic programs. To enable preventative and therapeutic at-home balance training, we aim to develop models for automatically 1) evaluating balance and, 2) delivering personalized training guidance for community dwelling OA and people with sensory disabilities.

Smart Phone Balance Trainer

Xingyu Zhang

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Xingyu Zhang is a Research Assistant Professor at the School of Nursing’s Applied Biostatistics Laboratory. He received his Ph.D. in Biomedical Science concentrated on biostatistics from the University of Auckland in 2016. Prior to joining the ABL, he was a postdoctoral research fellow in epidemiology and biostatistics at Emory University, and also a visiting research scholar in medical informatics at Georgia Institute of Technology. Dr. Zhang’s research focuses on healthcare outcomes with an emphasis on study design and statistical analysis. The methods he applied include multi-level analysis, time series analysis, infection early warning modeling, medical imaging analysis, feature extraction, pattern classification, neural networks, support vector machine, natural language processing, deep learning, survival analysis, meta-analysis, etc.

Ashley Payne

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I am interested in using observations, reanalysis, and numerical modeling to investigate the impacts, characteristics and climatology of extreme precipitation events. I use process-based studies for model evaluation and employ simple experiments to develop a mechanistic understanding of weather extremes and their interaction with climate.

A snapshot of an atmospheric river using MERRA-2 reanalysis. The shading shows total precipitable water (cm) and the contours show the magnitude of integrated vapor transport. Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are narrow and elongated pathways of anomalously strong horizontal water vapor transport in the lower portions of the atmosphere. They are found over most major ocean basins and are generally visible in integrated water vapor imagery poleward of the tropics. Their characteristics, such as landfall location, intensity, and duration, vary on intraseasonal and interannual timescales. This variability directly affects populations through impacts to water resources, hydrological extremes, and potential to contribute to compound hazards, such as the incidence of mudslides in regions recently impacted by wildfire.