Aditi Misra

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Transportation is the backbone of the urban mobility system and is one of the greatest sources of environmental emissions and pollutions. Making urban transportation efficient, equitable and sustainable is the main focus of my research. My students and I analyze small scale survey data as well as large scale spatiotemporal data to identify travel behavior trends and patterns at a disaggregate level using econometric methods, which we then scale up to the population level through predictive and statistical modeling. We also design our own data collection methods and instruments, be it a network of smart devices or stated preference experiments. Our expertise lies in identifying latent constructs that influence decisions and choices, which in turn dictate demands on the systems and subsystems. We use our expertise to design incentives and policy suggestions that can help promote sustainable and equitable multimodal transportation systems. Our team also uses data analytics, particularly classification and pattern recognition algorithms, to analyze crash context data and develop safety-critical scenarios for automated and connected vehicle (CAV) deployment. We have developed an online game based on such scenarios to promote safe shared mobility among teenagers and young adults and plan to expand research in that area. We are also currently expanding our research to explore the use of NN in context information synthesis.

This is a project where we used classification and Bayesian models to identify scenarios that are risky for pedestrians and bicyclists. We then developed an online game based on those scenarios for middle schoolers so that they are better prepared for shared road conflicts.

Sunghee Lee

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My research focuses on issues in data collection with hard-to-reach populations. In particular, she examines 1) nontraditional sampling approaches for minority or stigmatized populations and their statistical properties and 2) measurement error and comparability issues for racial, ethnic and linguistic minorities, which also have implications for cross-cultural research/survey methodology. Most recently, my research has been dedicated to respondent driven sampling that uses existing social networks to recruit participants in both face-to-face and Web data collection settings. I plan to expand my research scope in examining representation issues focusing on the racial/ethnic minority groups in the U.S. in the era of big data.

Todd I Herrenkohl

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Before joining the faculty at the University of Michigan in 2018 as Professor and Marion Elizabeth Blue Chair of Children and Families, I was Co-Director of the 3DL Partnership at the University of Washington, where I collaborated with academic colleagues, students, and service providers throughout the state to conduct and translate research on social emotional learning (SEL) and trauma-informed practices. I am now pursuing a similar line of research in Michigan, where I am collaborating with state partners and to identify, develop, and refine new approaches to disseminate research for schools and early childhood settings engaged in SEL and trauma work. As a scholar, I am committed to increasing the visibility, application, and sustainability of evidence-based programs and practices relevant to these topics and have worked extensively in the U.S. and internationally to advance goals for prevention and the promotion of child well-being.

Prasad R. Shankar

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I am an assistant professor of Radiology and an clinical researcher in the division of abdominal radiology. I am the departmental Associate Chair for Quality and Safety and chair of our departmental quality/safety research group, the Michigan Radiology Quality Collaborative. I have strong clinical and research interests in prostate cancer diagnosis and testing-related quality of life. I am actively engaged in research efforts to optimize precision imaging selection, through the help of big data.

Andrei Boutyline

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Cultural systems are fundamentally structural phenomena, defined by patterns of relations between elements of public representations and individual behaviors and cognitions. However, because such systems are difficult to capture with traditional empirical approaches, they usually remain understudied. In my work, I draw on network analysis, statistics, and computer science to create novel approaches to such analyses, and on cognitive science to theorize the objects of these investigations. Broader questions that interest me are: how are different cultural elements interrelated with one another? What is the relationship between public cultural representations and individual cognition and behavior? And how can we capture the structure of these interrelationships across large social and time scales? Methodologically, I am currently focused no developing applications of word embeddings and other natural language processing methods to sociological questions about cultural change.

Changing gender connotations of intelligence and studiousness throughout the latter half of the 20th century measured using word embeddings. Intelligence gained a masculine gender coding just as studiousness gained a masculine one. Scores are z-scored average cosine similarities between sets of keywords and a gender dimension. Data source: Corpus of Historical American English.

Yajuan Si

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My research lies in cutting-edge methodology development in streams of Bayesian statistics, complex survey inference, missing data imputation, causal inference, and data confidentiality protection. I have extensive collaboration experiences with health services researchers and epidemiologists to improve healthcare and public health practice, and have been providing statistical support to solve sampling and analysis issues on health and social science surveys.

John E Marcotte

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John E. Marcotte, PhD is a statistician and data security expert. His research concerns data sharing, data security, data management, disclosure, health policy, nursing staffing and patient outcomes. He has over 25 years of experience implementing computing systems and performing quantitative analysis. During his career, Marcotte has served as a quantitative researcher, biostatistician, data archivist, data security officer and computing director. Among Marcotte’s statistical fortes are linear and logistic regression, survival analysis and sampling while his computing specialties include secure systems, high performance systems and numerical methods. He has collaborated with social and natural scientists as well as nurses and physicians. Marcotte regularly presents at professional conferences and contributes to invited panels on data security and disclosure. He has formal training in Demography, Statistics and Computer Science.

Research Data Security Options

Ginger Shultz

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The Shultz group uses data science methods in two primary ways 1) to investigate student placement in introductory chemistry courses and 2) to analyze student texts to provide instructors actionable intelligence about student learning. Using regression discontinuity we investigated the impact of taking general chemistry prior to organic chemistry on student performance and persistence in later chemistry courses and found that students who took general chemistry first benefitted by 1/4 of a letter grade but were no more likely to persist. A continued investigation using survey and interview methods indicated that this was related to academic skills rather than content preparation. Through the MWrite project we have collected a large corpus of student texts and are developing automated text analysis methods to glean information about student learning across disciplines, with specific focus on scientific reasoning.

Network representation of writing moves made by students in argumentative writing with relevant transition probabilities. The size of the node represents the relative frequency of operation use and the edge labels represent the transition probability with key transitions highlighted in orange.

Victoria Morckel

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Dr. Morckel uses spatial and statistical methods to examine ways to improve quality of life for people living in shrinking, deindustrialized cities in the Midwestern United States. She is especially interested in the causes and consequences of population loss, including issues of vacancy, blight, and neighborhood change.

Suitability Analysis Results: Map of Potential Properties to Naturalize in the City of Flint, Michigan.