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Ho-Joon Lee

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Dr. Lee’s research in data science concerns biological questions in systems biology and network medicine by developing algorithms and models through a combination of statistical/machine learning, information theory, and network theory applied to multi-dimensional large-scale data. His projects have covered genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics from yeast to mouse to human for integrative analysis of regulatory networks on multiple molecular levels, which also incorporates large-scale public databases such as GO for functional annotation, PDB for molecular structures, and PubChem and LINCS for drugs or small compounds. He previously carried out proteomics and metabolomics along with a computational derivation of dynamic protein complexes for IL-3 activation and cell cycle in murine pro-B cells (Lee et al., Cell Reports 2017), for which he developed integrative analytical tools using diverse approaches from machine learning and network theory. His ongoing interests in methodology include machine/deep learning and topological Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy-based network theory, which are applied to (1) multi-level dynamic regulatory networks in immune response, cell cycle, and cancer metabolism and (2) mass spectrometry-based omics data analysis.

Figure 1. Proteomics and metabolomics analysis of IL-3 activation and cell cycle (Lee et al., Cell Reports 2017). (A) Multi-omics abundance profiles of proteins, modules/complexes, intracellular metabolites, and extracellular metabolites over one cell cycle (from left to right columns) in response to IL-3 activation. Red for proteins/modules/intracellular metabolites up-regulation or extracellular metabolites release; Green for proteins/modules/intracellular metabolites down-regulation or extracellular metabolites uptake. (B) Functional module network identified from integrative analysis. Red nodes are proteins and white nodes are functional modules. Expression profile plots are shown for literature-validated functional modules. (C) Overall pathway map of IL-3 activation and cell cycle phenotypes. (D) IL-3 activation and cell cycle as a cancer model along with candidate protein and metabolite biomarkers. (E) Protein co-expression scale-free network. (F) Power-low degree distribution of the network E. (G) Protein entropy distribution by topological Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy calculated for the network E.

 

S. Sriram

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S. Sriram, PhD, is Associate Professor of Marketing in the University of Michigan Ross School of Business, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Sriram’s research interests are in the areas of brand and product portfolio management, multi-sided platforms, healthcare policy, and online education. His research uses state of the art econometric methods to answer important managerial and policy-relevant questions. He has studied topics such as measuring and tracking brand equity and optimal allocation of resources to maintain long-term brand profitability, cannibalization, consumer adoption of technology products, and strategies for multi-sided platforms. Substantively, his research has spanned several industries including consumer packaged goods, technology products and services, retailing, news media, the interface of healthcare and marketing, and MOOCs.

Romesh Saigal

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Professor Saigal has held faculty positions at the Haas School of Business, Berkeley and the department of Industrial Engineering and Management Sciences at Northwestern University, has been a researcher at the Bell Telephone Laboratories and numerous short term visiting positions. He currently teaches courses in Financial Engineering. In the recent past he taught courses in optimization, and Management Science. His current research involves data based studies of operational problems in the areas of Finance, Transportation, Renewable Energy and Healthcare, with an emphasis on the management and pricing of risks. This involves the use of data analytics, optimization, stochastic processes and financial engineering tools. His earlier research involved theoretical investigation into interior point methods, large scale optimization and software development for mathematical programming. He is an author of two books on optimization and large set of publications in top refereed journals. He has been an associate editor of Management Science and is a member of SIAM, AMS and AAAS. He has served as the Director of the interdisciplinary Financial Engineering Program and as the Director of Interdisciplinary Professional Programs (now Integrative Design + Systems) at the College of Engineering.

Marcelline Harris

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Marcelline Harris, Ph.D., R.N., is Associate Professor of Systems, Populations and Leadership in the School of Nursing at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Dr. Harris’s research interests focus on what is being labeled the “continuous use” of clinical data (the use of clinical data for one or more purposes), computable knowledge representation strategies, and the use of electronic clinical data for practice and research.  Her research has been funded by NIH, AHRQ, RWJF, and PCORI.  Harris also has extensive enterprise level experience, having served in both scientific and operational positions that address the development and governance of systems that support the capture, storage, indexing, and retrieval of clinical data.  At Michigan, she retains this translational perspective, emphasizing clinical data for patient-centered research, clinical surveillance and predictive analytics.

Bryan R. Goldsmith

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Bryan R. Goldsmith, PhD, is Assistant Professor in the department of Chemical Engineering within the College of Engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Goldsmith’s research group utilizes first-principles modeling (e.g., density-functional theory and wave function based methods), molecular simulation, and data analytics tools (e.g., compressed sensing, kernel ridge regression, and subgroup discovery) to extract insights of catalysts and materials for sustainable chemical and energy production and to help create a platform for their design. For example, the group has exploited subgroup discovery as a data-mining approach to help find interpretable local patterns, correlations, and descriptors of a target property in materials-science data.  They also have been using compressed sensing techniques to find physically meaningful models that predict the properties of perovskite (ABX3) compounds.

Prof. Goldsmith’s areas of research encompass energy research, materials science, nanotechnology, physics, and catalysis.

A computational prediction for a group of gold nanoclusters (global model) could miss patterns unique to nonplaner clusters (subgroup 1) or planar clusters (subgroup 2).

A computational prediction for a group of gold nanoclusters (global model) could miss patterns unique to nonplaner clusters (subgroup 1) or planar clusters (subgroup 2).

 

Peter Adriaens

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My research focus is on the development and application of machine learning tools to large scale financial and unstructured (textual) data to extract, quantify and predict risk profiles and investment grade rating of private and public companies.  Example datasets include social media and financial aggregators such as Bloomberg, Pitchbook, and Privco.

Kai S. Cortina

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Kai S. Cortina, PhD, is Professor of Psychology in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Cortina’s major research revolves around the understanding of children’s and adolescents’ pathways into adulthood and the role of the educational system in this process. The academic and psycho-social development is analyzed from a life-span perspective exclusively analyzing longitudinal data over longer periods of time (e.g., from middle school to young adulthood). The hierarchical structure of the school system (student/classroom/school/district/state/nations) requires the use of statistical tools that can handle these kind of nested data.

 

Rie Suzuki

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Dr. Suzuki is a behavioral scientist and has major research interests in examining and intervening mediational social determinants factors of health behaviors and health outcomes across lifespan. She analyzes the National Health Interview Survey, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey as well as the Flint regional medical records to understand the factors associating with poor health outcomes among people with disabilities including children and aging.

Greg Rybarczyk

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Using GIS, visual analytics, and spatiotemporal modeling, Dr. Rybarczyk examines the utility of Big Data for gaining insight into the causal mechanisms that influence travel patterns and urban dynamics. In particular, his research sets out to provide a fuller understanding of “what” and “where” micro-scale conditions affect human sentiment and hence wayfinding ability, movement patterns, and travel mode-choices.

Recent works:

Rybarczyk, G. and S. Banerjee. (2015) Visualizing active travel sentiment in an urban context, Journal of Transport and Health, 2(2): 30

Rybarczyk, G., S. Banerjee, and M. Starking-Szymanski, and R. Shaker. (2018) “Travel and us: The impact of mode share on sentiment using geosocial media data and GIS” Journal of Location-Based Services (forthcoming)

Vahid Lotfi

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My current research interest is focused on improving efficiency and utilization of outpatient clinics, using data mining techniques such as decision tree analysis, Bayesian networks, neural networks, and similar techniques.  While our previous and continuing research have been focused on using some of these techniques to develop more sophisticated methods of patients scheduling within physical therapy clinics, we can see the applicability of the techniques to other types of health services providers.  There is also applicability to university administration in developing predictive models using data mining techniques for assessing student success.