Explore ARCExplore ARC

Harm Derksen

By |

Current research includes a project funded by Toyota that uses Markov Models and Machine Learning to predict heart arrhythmia, an NSF-funded project to detect Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) from x-ray images and projects using tensor analysis on health care data (funded by the Department of Defense and National Science Foundation).

Yongsheng Bai

By |

Dr. Bai’s research interests lie in development and refinement of bioinformatics algorithms/software and databases on next-generation sequencing (NGS data), development of statistical model for solving biological problems, bioinformatics analysis of clinical data, as well as other topics including, but not limited to, uncovering disease genes and variants using informatics approaches, computational analysis of cis-regulation and comparative motif finding, large-scale genome annotation, comparative “omics”, and evolutionary genomics.

Neda Masoud

By |

The future of transportation lies at the intersection of two emerging trends, namely, the sharing economy and connected and automated vehicle technology. Our research group investigates the impact of these two major trends on the future of mobility, quantifying the benefits and identifying the challenges of integrating these technologies into our current systems.

Our research on shared-use mobility systems focuses on peer-to-peer (P2P) ridesharing and multi-modal transportation. We provide: (i) operational tools and decision support systems for shared-use mobility in legacy as well as connected and automated transportation systems. This line of research focuses on system design as well as routing, scheduling, and pricing mechanisms to serve on-demand transportation requests; (ii) insights for regulators and policy makers on mobility benefits of multi-modal transportation; (ii) planning tools that would allow for informed regulations of sharing economy.

In another line of research we investigate challenges faced by the connected automated vehicle technology before mass adoption of this technology can occur. Our research mainly focuses on (i) transition of control authority between the human driver and the autonomous entity in semi-autonomous (level 3 SAE autonomy) vehicles; (ii) incorporating network-level information supplied by connected vehicle technology into traditional trajectory planning; (iii) improving vehicle localization by taking advantage of opportunities provided by connected vehicles; and (iv) cybersecurity challenges in connected and automated systems. We seek to quantify the mobility and safety implications of this disruptive technology, and provide insights that can allow for informed regulations.

Ho-Joon Lee

By |

Dr. Lee’s research in data science concerns biological questions in systems biology and network medicine by developing algorithms and models through a combination of statistical/machine learning, information theory, and network theory applied to multi-dimensional large-scale data. His projects have covered genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics from yeast to mouse to human for integrative analysis of regulatory networks on multiple molecular levels, which also incorporates large-scale public databases such as GO for functional annotation, PDB for molecular structures, and PubChem and LINCS for drugs or small compounds. He previously carried out proteomics and metabolomics along with a computational derivation of dynamic protein complexes for IL-3 activation and cell cycle in murine pro-B cells (Lee et al., Cell Reports 2017), for which he developed integrative analytical tools using diverse approaches from machine learning and network theory. His ongoing interests in methodology include machine/deep learning and topological Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy-based network theory, which are applied to (1) multi-level dynamic regulatory networks in immune response, cell cycle, and cancer metabolism and (2) mass spectrometry-based omics data analysis.

Figure 1. Proteomics and metabolomics analysis of IL-3 activation and cell cycle (Lee et al., Cell Reports 2017). (A) Multi-omics abundance profiles of proteins, modules/complexes, intracellular metabolites, and extracellular metabolites over one cell cycle (from left to right columns) in response to IL-3 activation. Red for proteins/modules/intracellular metabolites up-regulation or extracellular metabolites release; Green for proteins/modules/intracellular metabolites down-regulation or extracellular metabolites uptake. (B) Functional module network identified from integrative analysis. Red nodes are proteins and white nodes are functional modules. Expression profile plots are shown for literature-validated functional modules. (C) Overall pathway map of IL-3 activation and cell cycle phenotypes. (D) IL-3 activation and cell cycle as a cancer model along with candidate protein and metabolite biomarkers. (E) Protein co-expression scale-free network. (F) Power-low degree distribution of the network E. (G) Protein entropy distribution by topological Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy calculated for the network E.

 

Yi Lu Murphey

By |

Dr. Yi Lu Murphey is an Associate Dean for Graduate Education and Research, a Professor of the ECE(Electrical and Computer Engineering) department and the director of the Intelligent Systems Lab at the University of Michigan, Dearborn. She received a M.S. degree in computer science from Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, in 1983, and a Ph.D degree with a major in Computer Engineering and a minor in Control Engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, in 1989. Her current research interests are in the areas of machine learning, pattern recognition, computer vision and intelligent systems with applications to automated and connected vehicles, optimal vehicle power management, data analytics, and robotic vision systems. She has authored over 130 publications in refereed journals and conference proceedings. She is an editor for the Journal of Pattern Recognition, a senior life member of AAAI and a fellow of IEEE.

Kai S. Cortina

By |

Kai S. Cortina, PhD, is Professor of Psychology in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Cortina’s major research revolves around the understanding of children’s and adolescents’ pathways into adulthood and the role of the educational system in this process. The academic and psycho-social development is analyzed from a life-span perspective exclusively analyzing longitudinal data over longer periods of time (e.g., from middle school to young adulthood). The hierarchical structure of the school system (student/classroom/school/district/state/nations) requires the use of statistical tools that can handle these kind of nested data.

 

Emily Mower Provost

By |

Research in the CHAI lab focuses on emotion modeling (classification and perception) and assistive technology (bipolar disorder and aphasia).

Behavioral Signal Processing Approach to Modeling Human-centered Data

Behavioral Signal Processing Approach to Modeling Human-centered Data

Nils G. Walter

By |

Nils G. Walter, PhD, is the Francis S. Collins Collegiate Professor of Chemistry, Biophysics and Biological Chemistry, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts and Professor of Biological Chemistry, Medical School, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Nature and Nanotechnology likewise employ nanoscale machines that self-assemble into structures of complex architecture and functionality.  Fluorescence microscopy offers a non-invasive tool to probe and ultimately dissect and control these nanoassemblies in real-time.  In particular, single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) allows us to measure distances at the 2-8 nm scale, whereas complementary super-resolution localization techniques based on Gaussian fitting of imaged point spread functions (PSFs) measure distances in the 10 nm and longer range.  In terms of Big Data Analysis, we have developed a method for the intracellular single molecule, high-resolution localization and counting (iSHiRLoC) of microRNAs (miRNAs), a large group of gene silencers with profound roles in our body, from stem cell development to cancer.  Microinjected, singly-fluorophore labeled, functional miRNAs are tracked at super-resolution within individual diffusing particles.  Observed mobility and mRNA dependent assembly changes suggest the existence of two kinetically distinct assembly processes.  We are currently feeding these data into a single molecule systems biology pipeline to bring into focus the unifying molecular mechanism of such a ubiquitous gene regulatory pathway.  In addition, we are using cluster analysis of smFRET time traces to show that large RNA processing machines such as single spliceosomes – responsible for the accurate removal of all intervening sequences (introns) in pre-messenger RNAs – are working as biased Brownian ratchet machines.  On the opposite end of the application spectrum, we utilize smFRET and super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to monitor enhanced enzyme cascades and nanorobots engineered to self-assemble and function on DNA origami.

Artistic depiction of the SiMREPS platform we are building for the direct single molecule counting of miRNA biomarkers in crude biofluids (Johnson-Buck, A. et al. Kinetic fingerprinting to identify and count single nucleic acids. Nat Biotechnol 33, 730-732 (2015)).

Artistic depiction of the SiMREPS platform we are building for the direct single molecule counting of miRNA biomarkers in crude biofluids (Johnson-Buck, A. et al. Kinetic fingerprinting to identify and count single nucleic acids. Nat Biotechnol 33, 730-732 (2015)).

Jie Shen

By |

One of my research interests is in the digital diagnosis of material damage based on sensors, computational science and numerical analysis with large-scale 3D computed tomography data: (1) Establishment of a multi-resolution transformation rule of material defects. (2) Design of an accurate digital diagnosis method for material damage. (3) Reconstruction of defects in material domains from X-ray CT data . (4) Parallel computation of materials damage. My team also conducted a series of studies for improving the quality of large-scale laser scanning data in reverse engineering and industrial inspection: (1) Detection and removal of non-isolated Outlier Data Clusters (2) Accurate correction of surface data noise of polygonal meshes (3) Denoising of two-dimensional geometric discontinuities.

Another research focus is on the information fusion of large-scale data from autonomous driving. Our research is funded by China Natural Science Foundation with focus on (1) laser-based perception in degraded visual environment, (2) 3D pattern recognition with dynamic, incomplete, noisy point clouds, (3) real-time image processing algorithms in degraded visual environment, and (4) brain-computer interface to predict the state of drivers.

Processing and Analysis of 3D Large-Scale Engineering Data

Processing and Analysis of 3D Large-Scale Engineering Data

Omid Dehzangi

By |

Omid Dehzangi, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Science, College of Engineering and Computer Science, at the University of Michigan, Dearborn.

Wearable health technology is drawing significant attention for good reasons. The pervasive nature of such systems providing ubiquitous access to the continuous personalized data will transform the way people interact with each other and their environment. The resulting information extracted from these systems will enable emerging applications in healthcare, wellness, emergency response, fitness monitoring, elderly care support, long-term preventive chronic care, assistive care, smart environments, sports, gaming, and entertainment which create many new research opportunities and transform researches from various disciplines into data science which is the methodological terminology for data collection, data management, data analysis, and data visualization. Despite the ground-breaking potentials, there are a number of interesting challenges in order to design and develop wearable medical embedded systems. Due to limited available resources in wearable processing architectures, power-efficiency is demanded to allow unobtrusive and long-term operation of the hardware. Also, the data-intensive nature of continuous health monitoring requires efficient signal processing and data analytic algorithms for real-time, scalable, reliable, accurate, and secure extraction of relevant information from an overwhelmingly large amount of data. Therefore, extensive research in their design, development, and assessment is necessary. Embedded Processing Platform Design The majority of my work concentrates on designing wearable embedded processing platforms in order to shift the conventional paradigms from hospital-centric healthcare with episodic and reactive focus on diseases to patient-centric and home-based healthcare as an alternative segment which demands outstanding specialized design in terms of hardware design, software development, signal processing and uncertainty reduction, data analysis, predictive modeling and information extraction. The objective is to reduce the costs and improve the effectiveness of healthcare by proactive early monitoring, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases (i.e. preventive) as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Embedded processing platform in healthcare