Jesse Hamilton

By |

My research focuses on the development of novel Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology for imaging the heart. We focus in particular on quantitative imaging techniques, in which the signal intensity at each pixel in an image represents a measurement of an inherent property of a tissue. Much of our research is based on cardiac Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (MRF), which is a class of methods for simultaneously measuring multiple tissue properties from one rapid acquisition.

Our group is exploring novel ways to combine physics-based modeling of MRI scans with deep learning algorithms for several purposes. First, we are exploring the use of deep learning to design quantitative MRI scans with improved accuracy and precision. Second, we are developing deep learning approaches for image reconstruction that will allow us to reduce image noise, improve spatial resolution and volumetric coverage, and enable highly accelerated acquisitions to shorten scan times. Third, we are exploring ways of using artificial intelligence to derive physiological motion signals directly from MRI data to enable continuous scanning that is robust to cardiac and breathing motion. In general, we focus on algorithms that are either self-supervised or use training data generated in computer simulations, since the collection of large amounts of training data from human subjects is often impractical when designing novel imaging methods.

Niko Kaciroti

By |

Niko Kaciroti is a Research Scientist at the Departments of Pediatrics and Biostatistics. He received his PhD in Biostatistics from the University of Michigan. Since then he has collaborated in multidisciplinary research at the University of Michigan and with researchers from other universities in the United States and internationally. Dr. Kaciroti is a faculty member at the Center for Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics. His main research interest is in using Bayesian models for analyzing longitudinal data from clinical trials with missing values, as well as using Bayesian methods for nonlinear and dynamic models. Dr. Kaciroti is an elected member of the International Statistical Institute and serves as statistical editor for the American Journal of Preventive Medicine and the International Journal of Behavior Nutrition and Physical Activity.

Kathryn Luker

By |

As an expert in molecular imaging of single cell signaling in cancer, I develop integrated systems of molecular, cellular, optical, and custom image processing tools to extract rich data sets for biochemical and behavioral functions in living cells over minutes to days. Data sets composed of thousands to millions of cells enable us to develop predictive models of cellular function through a variety of computational approaches, including ODE, ABM, and IRL modeling.

Xianglei Huang

By |

Prof. Huang is specialized in satellite remote sensing, atmospheric radiation, and climate modeling. Optimization, pattern analysis, and dimensional reduction are extensively used in his research for explaining observed spectrally resolved infrared spectra, estimating geophysical parameters from such hyperspectral observations, and deducing human influence on the climate in the presence of natural variability of the climate system. His group has also developed a deep-learning model to make a data-driven solar forecast model for use in the renewable energy sector.

Rajiv Saran

By |

Dr. Saran is an internationally recognized expert in kidney disease research – specifically, in the area of kidney disease surveillance and epidemiology. From 2014 – 2019, he served as Director of the United States Renal Data System (USRDS; www.usrds.org), a ‘gold standard’ for kidney disease data systems, worldwide. Since 2006 he has been Co-Principal Investigator for the Centers for the Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) National CKD Surveillance System for the US, a one of a kind project that complements the USRDS, while focusing on upstream surveillance of CKD and its risk factors (www.cdc.org/ckd/surveillance). Both projects have influenced policy related to kidney disease in the US and were cited extensively in the July 2019 Advancing American Kidney Health Federal policy document. Dr. Saran led the development of the first National Kidney Disease Information System (VA-REINS), for the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), funded by the VA’s Center for Innovation, and one that led to the VA recognizing the importance of kidney disease as a health priority for US veterans. Dr. Saran has recently (2018-2021) been funded on a spin off project from VA REINS for investigation of ‘hot-spot’ of kidney disease among US Veterans involving both risk-prediction and geospatial analyses – a modern approach to health system big data being used for prevention and population health improvement, using kidney disease as an example. This approach has broad application for prevention and optimizing management of major chronic diseases.

Nicholas Henderson

By |

My research primarily focuses on the following main themes: 1) development of methods for risk prediction and analyzing treatment effect heterogeneity, 2) Bayesian nonparametrics and Bayesian machine learning methods with a particular emphasis on the use of these methods in the context of survival analysis, 3) statistical methods for analyzing heterogeneity in risk-benefit profiles and for supporting individualized treatment decisions, and 4) development of empirical Bayes and shrinkage methods for high-dimensional statistical applications. I am also broadly interested in collaborative work in biomedical research with a focus on the application of statistics in cancer research.

Sindhu Kutty

By |

My research centers on studying the interaction between abstract, theoretically sound probabilistic algorithms and human beings. One aspect of my research explores connections of Machine Learning to Crowdsourcing and Economics; focused in both cases on better understanding the aggregation process. As Machine Learning algorithms are used in making decisions that affect human lives, I am interested in evaluating the fairness of Machine Learning algorithms as well as exploring various paradigms of fairness. I study how these notions interact with more traditional performance metrics. My research in Computer Science Education focuses on developing and using evidence-based techniques in educating undergraduates in Machine Learning. To this end, I have developed a pilot summer program to introduce students to current Machine Learning research and enable them to make a more informed decision about what role they would like research to play in their future. I have also mentored (and continue to mentor) undergraduate students and work with students to produce publishable, and award-winning, undergraduate research.

Mithun Chakraborty

By |

My broad research interests are in multi-agent systems, computational economics and finance, and artificial intelligence. I apply techniques from algorithmic game theory, statistical machine learning, decision theory, etc. to a variety of problems at the intersection of the computational and social sciences. A major focus of my research has been the design and analysis of market-making algorithms for financial markets and, in particular, prediction markets — incentive-based mechanisms for aggregating data in the form of private beliefs about uncertain events (e.g. the outcome of an election) distributed among strategic agents. I use both analytical and simulation-based methods to investigate the impact of factors such as wealth, risk attitude, manipulative behavior, etc. on information aggregation in market ecosystems. Another line of work I am pursuing involves algorithms for allocating resources based on preference data collected from potential recipients, satisfying efficiency, fairness, and diversity criteria; my joint work on ethnicity quotas in Singapore public housing allocation deserves special mention in this vein. More recently, I have got involved in research on empirical game-theoretic analysis, a family of methods for building tractable models of complex, procedurally defined games from empirical/simulated payoff data and using them to reason about game outcomes.

Elliott Rouse

By |

My reserach group–theNeurobionics Lab–has two chief goals. Firstly, we seek to answer fundamental questions about human locomotion through a deeper understanding of how limb mechanics are felt and regulated by the nervous system. These properties are important because they govern how people respond to disturbances during gait, such as unexpectedly stepping on an obstacle, or carefully walking over uneven terrain. Moreover, the ability to regulate these mechanics is drastically impaired following neurological injury. As a result, impaired individuals fall more frequently, fatigue faster, and have abnormal gait patterns that inhibit daily life. The more we understand about how the brain controls the body during locomotion, the better we can assess, track, and treat the changes that occur following neurological injury.

The second mission of the group is to develop technologies that address the deficits that arise from neuropathologies and amputation. We leverage biomimetic design and control approaches to develop novel wearable robotic systems. Our intent is to not only address the locomotor deficits of these individuals, but also enable them to exceed the performance of their able-bodied counterparts. Our approach is unique: the biomechanical science that we discover is used to develop a new class of assistive technology. Through interdisciplinary, bidirectional feedback between science and engineering, the Neurobionics Lab conducts innovative work that will eventually impact the lives of the disabled.

Rahul Ladhania

By |

Rahul Ladhania is an Assistant Professor of Health Informatics in the Department of Health Management & Policy at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. He also has a secondary (courtesy) appointment with the Department of Biostatistics at SPH. Rahul’s research is in the area of causal inference and machine learning in public and behavioral health. A large body of his work focuses on estimating personalized treatment rules and heterogeneous effects of policy, digital and behavioral interventions on human behavior and health outcomes in complex experimental and observational settings using statistical machine learning methods.

Rahul co-leads the Machine Learning team at the Behavior Change For Good Initiative (Penn), where he is working on two `mega-studies’ (very large multi-arm randomized trials): one in partnership with a national fitness chain, to estimate the effects of behavioral interventions on promoting gym visit habit formation; and the other in partnership with two large Mid-Atlantic health systems and a national pharmacy chain, to estimate the effects of text-based interventions on increasing flu shot vaccination rates. His other projects involve partnerships with step-counting apps and mobile-based games to learn user behavior patterns, and design and evaluate interventions and their heterogeneous effects on user behavior.