Lucia Cevidanes

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We have developed and tested machine learning approaches to integrate quantitative markers for diagnosis and assessment of progression of TMJ OA, as well as extended the capabilities of 3D Slicer4 into web-based tools and disseminated open source image analysis tools. Our aims use data processing and in-depth analytics combined with learning using privileged information, integrated feature selection, and testing the performance of longitudinal risk predictors. Our long term goals are to improve diagnosis and risk prediction of TemporoMandibular Osteoarthritis in future multicenter studies.

The Spectrum of Data Science for Diagnosis of Osteoarthritis of the Temporomandibular Joint

Joshua Stein

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As a board-certified ophthalmologist and glaucoma specialist, I have more than 15 years of clinical experience caring for patients with different types and complexities of glaucoma. In addition to my clinical experience, as a health services researcher, I have developed experience and expertise in several disciplines including performing analyses using large health care claims databases to study utilization and outcomes of patients with ocular diseases, racial and other disparities in eye care, associations between systemic conditions or medication use and ocular diseases. I have learned the nuances of various data sources and ways to maximize our use of these data sources to answer important and timely questions. Leveraging my background in HSR with new skills in bioinformatics and precision medicine, over the past 2-3 years I have been developing and growing the Sight Outcomes Research Collaborative (SOURCE) repository, a powerful tool that researchers can tap into to study patients with ocular diseases. My team and I have spent countless hours devising ways of extracting electronic health record data from Clarity, cleaning and de-identifying the data, and making it linkable to ocular diagnostic test data (OCT, HVF, biometry) and non-clinical data. Now that we have successfully developed such a resource here at Kellogg, I am now collaborating with colleagues at > 2 dozen academic ophthalmology departments across the country to assist them with extracting their data in the same format and sending it to Kellogg so that we can pool the data and make it accessible to researchers at all of the participating centers for research and quality improvement studies. I am also actively exploring ways to integrate data from SOURCE into deep learning and artificial intelligence algorithms, making use of SOURCE data for genotype-phenotype association studies and development of polygenic risk scores for common ocular diseases, capturing patient-reported outcome data for the majority of eye care recipients, enhancing visualization of the data on easy-to-access dashboards to aid in quality improvement initiatives, and making use of the data to enhance quality of care, safety, efficiency of care delivery, and to improve clinical operations. .

Akbar Waljee

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I use machine-learning techniques to implement decision support systems and tools that facilitate more personalized care for disease management and healthcare utilization to ultimately deliver efficient, effective, and equitable therapy for chronic diseases. To test and advance these general principles, I have built operational programs that are guiding—and improving—patient care in costly in low resource settings, including emerging countries.

Jim Omartian

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My research explores the interplay between corporate decisions and employee actions. I currently use anonymized mobile device data to observe individual behaviors, and employ both unsupervised and supervised machine learning techniques.

Jeffrey Morenoff

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Jeffrey D. Morenoff is a professor of sociology, a research professor at the Institute for Social Research (ISR), and a professor of public policy at the Ford School. He is also director of the ISR Population Studies Center. Professor Morenoff’s research interests include neighborhood environments, inequality, crime and criminal justice, the social determinants of health, racial/ethnic/immigrant disparities in health and antisocial behavior, and methods for analyzing multilevel and spatial data.

Nancy Fleischer

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Dr. Fleischer’s research focuses on how the broader socioeconomic and policy environments impact health disparities and the health of vulnerable populations, in the U.S. and around the world. Through this research, her group employs various analytic techniques to examine data at multiple levels (country-level, state-level, and neighborhood-level), emphasizing the role of structural influences on individual health. Her group applies advanced epidemiologic, statistical, and econometric methods to this research, including survey methodology, longitudinal data analysis, hierarchical modeling, causal inference, systems science, and difference-in-difference analysis. Dr. Fleischer leads two NCI-funded projects focused on the impact of tobacco control policies on health equity in the U.S.

Achyuta Adhvaryu

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My data science-related work deals with predicting productivity of entry-level workers using applicants’ psychometric profiles. The work has relevance for the design of AI-based hiring, job search for unemployed workers, sectoral transitions (particularly for entry-level workers), and the design of optimal incentive contracts based on worker type.

Gary L. Freed

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I conduct a broad range of research on health policy and health economics focused on children. I will be launching a program on child health equity in the fall of 2020.

Amy Pienta

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My research at ICPSR is developing ingest and curation workflows for new data types (including EEG) to ensure these data are Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable (FAIR) within data repositories.

My funded projects and programs:
National Addiction and HIV Data Archive Program (NAHDAP) funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Health and Medical Care Archive funded by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF)
Archive of Data on Disability to Enhance Policy and research (ADDEP) funded by NIH