Vineet Kamat

Vineet Kamat

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My group conducts research in automation and robotics to improve work processes in the construction, operation, and maintenance of civil infrastructure and the built environment. Our research has developed several licensable technologies that include visualization, perception, and modeling techniques to help on-site construction robots with autonomous decision making. We are particularly interested in exploring new methods for enabling collaborative work strategies for human-robot teams jointly performing field construction work. In addition, we are also interested in exploring methods to integrate data to support semi-autonomous mobility for people with physical disabilities in the urban built environment.

Data-Driven Co-Robotic Field Construction Work

Michael Cianfrocco

Michael Cianfrocco

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Dr. Michael Cianfrocco uses cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to determine protein structures to understand how nanometer-sized molecular machines work. While a powerful technique, cryo-EM data collection and subsequent image analysis remain bespoke, clunky, and heuristic. Dr. Cianfrocco is coupling his 16+ years of experience with artificial intelligence to automate data collection and processing by capturing human expertise into AI-based algorithms. Recently, his laboratory implemented reinforcement learning to guide cryo-electron microscopes for data collection [1, 2]. This work combined real-world datasets and Dr. Cianfrocco’s expertise with AI-driven optimization algorithms to find the ‘best’ areas of cryo-EM samples for data collection.

cryoRL Distributed Data Collection process diagram

Human users must curate and select areas for subsequent analysis after data collection. Subjective decisions guide how to process the single particles and determine what constitutes ‘good’ data. To automate subsequent preprocessing, Dr. Cianfrocco’s lab built the first AI-backed data preprocessing in cryo-EM by training CNNs to recognize ‘good’ and ‘bad’ cryo-EM data [3]. This work enabled fully-automated cryo-EM data preprocessing, the first step in the processing pipeline of cryo-EM data. In the future, Dr. Cianfrocco wants to continue improving cryo-EM workflows to make them robust and automated, eventually surpassing human experts in the ability of algorithms to collect and analyze cryo-EM data. 1. Fan Q*, Li Y*, et al. “CryoRL: Reinforcement Learning Enables Efficient Cryo-EM Data Collection.” arXiv preprint arXiv:2204.07543 (2022). 2. Li Y*, Fan Q*, Optimized path planning surpasses human efficiency in cryo-EM imaging. bioRxiv 2022.06.17.496614 (2022). 3. Li Y, High-Throughput Cryo-EM Enabled by User-Free Preprocessing Routines. Structure. 2020 Jul 7;28(7):858-869.e3.

Sally Oey

Sally Oey

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Sally Oey’s group is studying massive star populations and the escape of ionizing radiation from starburst galaxies and super star clusters. The group is at the forefront of establishing a new paradigm for massive-star feedback, where superwinds from compact young star clusters fail to launch. Members have used numerical simulations and image processing techniques to investigate such conditions for allowing ionizing radiation to penetrate the dense gas in star-forming clouds and the interstellar medium in “green pea” galaxies and resolved nearby starbursts. The ionizing radiation may originate from massive binaries and their products, thus group members are carrying out data mining of observational surveys and binary population synthesis models to study how binarity manifests in stellar populations.

Elizabeth Bondi-Kelly

Elizabeth Bondi-Kelly

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My research interests lie broadly in the area of artificial intelligence (AI) for social impact, particularly spanning the fields of multi-agent systems and data science for conservation and public health.

Katie Skinner

Katie Skinner

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My research spans robotics, computer vision, and machine learning with a focus on enabling autonomy in dynamic, unstructured, or remote environments across field robotics applications (air, land, sea, and space). In particular, my group focuses on problems that rely on limited labeled data.

Ryan Stidham

Ryan Stidham

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Dr. Stidham is an academic gastroenterologist specializing in medical image analysis in Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), and gastroenterology conditions at large. His research is focused on developing new measures of disease activity to power automated care models and clinical decision support systems in IBD with a focus on medical image analysis and new technology development. His work has focused on automation of existing IBD disease measures that relying on colonoscopy, CT, MRI, and ultrasound using neural networks and novel image analysis approaches. Dr. Stidham is also developing new measures of disease activity, inflammation, and fibrosis that leverage advances in image segmentation, transfer learning, signals analysis, and fuzzy network approaches as well as collaborating for development of new image acquisition modalities. Finally, his team has active projects in collaboration with the Department of Learning Health Sciences for merging data from clinical office notes with imaging data using computational linguistics approaches. His work has been supported by the NIH, DOD, NSF, and several large investigator-initiated industry collaborations.

Sabine Loos

Sabine Loos

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My research focuses on natural hazards and disaster information, everything from understanding where disaster data comes from, how it’s used, and its implications to design improved disaster information systems that prioritize the human experience and lead to more effective and equitable outcomes.

My lab takes a user-centered and data-driven approach. We aim to understand user needs and the effect of data on users’ decisions through qualitative research, such as focus groups or workshops. We then design new information systems through geospatial/GIS analysis, risk analysis, and statistical modeling techniques. We often work with earth observation, sensor, and survey data. We consider various aspects of disaster information, whether it be the hazard, its physical impacts, its social impacts, or a combination of the three.

I also focus on the communication of information, through data visualization techniques, and host a Risk and Resilience DAT/Artathon to build data visualization capacity for early career professionals.

Geospatial model for predicting inequities in recovery from the 2015 Nepal earthquake

Brian Weeks

Brian Weeks

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In the Weeks lab, we work at the intersection of ecology and evolutionary biology to try to understand how large scale biodiversity patterns arose, and what they might tell us about how natural systems will respond to human activities. We have a particular focus on the impacts of climate change on birds, and are increasingly using computer vision tools to measure bird traits on large numbers of photographs of museum skeletal specimens. This new approach has enabled us to generate skeletal trait datasets at an unprecedented scale that have begun to reveal some fascinating patterns in bird morphology that we are using to understand biotic responses to global change.

Photograph of Alison Davis Rabosky

Alison Davis Rabosky

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Our research group studies how and why an organism’s traits (“phenotypes”) evolve in natural populations. Explaining the mechanisms that generate and regulate patterns of phenotypic diversity is a major goal of evolutionary biology: why do we see rapid shifts to strikingly new and distinct character states, and how stable are these evolutionary transitions across space and time? To answer these questions, we generate and analyze high-throughput “big data” on both genomes and phenotypes across the 18,000 species of reptiles and amphibians across the globe. Then, we use the statistical tools of phylogenetic comparative analysis, geometric morphometrics of 3D anatomy generated from CT scans, and genome annotation and comparative transcriptomics to understand the integrated trait correlations that create complex phenotypes. Currently, we are using machine learning and neural networks to study the color patterns of animals vouchered into biodiversity collections and test hypotheses about the ecological causes and evolutionary consequences of phenotypic innovation. We are especially passionate about the effective and accurate visualization of large-scale multidimensional datasets, and we prioritize training in both best practices and new innovations in quantitative data display.

Picture of Thomas Schwarz

Thomas A. Schwarz

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Professor Schwarz is an experimental particle physicist who has performed research in astro-particle physics, collider physics, as well as in accelerator physics and RF engineering. His current research focuses on discovering new physics in high-energy collisions with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. His particular focus is in precision measurements of properties of the Higgs Boson and searching for new associated physics using advanced AI and machine learning techniques.