Picture of Thomas Schwarz

Thomas A. Schwarz

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Professor Schwarz is an experimental particle physicist who has performed research in astro-particle physics, collider physics, as well as in accelerator physics and RF engineering. His current research focuses on discovering new physics in high-energy collisions with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. His particular focus is in precision measurements of properties of the Higgs Boson and searching for new associated physics using advanced AI and machine learning techniques.

Nazanin Andalibi

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I use mixed methods to investigate social media’s use and roles in relation to self-disclosure, social support exchange, and other disclosure behavior outcomes and responses to them. I concentrate on experiences that can be distressing, traumatizing, isolating, or stigmatized, and contribute to poor wellbeing. Broadly, in these contexts, I address how we can design social computing systems that facilitate beneficial sensitive disclosures and desired disclosure outcomes such as (but not limited to) exchanging social support, meaningful interactions, reciprocal disclosures, and reduced stigma. Some contexts my work has focused on in the past include: mental health, sexual abuse, and pregnancy loss.

The research trajectory described above focuses on other social media users as information/disclosure recipients. I also investigate people’s attitudes and concerns when companies and algorithms are audiences or recipients of one’s sensitive information. This work goes beyond social media applications to include other types of social technologies. I critically examine the ways emerging technologies such as emotion artificial intelligence may engage with humans in times of distress or in otherwise private and personal settings. I explore the extent to which designing these technologies is appropriate in different contexts, and investigate what it would take for them to be sensitive to and foreground people’s values, needs, and desires.

Jordan Mckay

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He/Him

Jordan McKay is a Project Associate Manager at MIDAS. An Ann Arbor native, Jordan received his Bachelors in Computer Science from University of Michigan, and his Masters in Information at the University of Michigan School of Information. Outside of business hours, Jordan also works as a conductor, concert pianist, and Music Director with a number of organizations in the Ann Arbor area.

In addition to his duties administrating the day-to-day operations for MIDAS, its website, its events, and its part-time staff, Jordan is an engaged member of the data science community. Jordan is a determined advocate for ethical AI, data sovereignty, accessibility, digital privacy, and humane information system design, and is proud to be a member of a team that is working to make data a force for good in our society.

Stefanus Jasin

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My research focus the application and development of new algorithms for solving complex business analytics problems. Applications vary from revenue management, dynamic pricing, marketing analytics, to retail logistics. In terms of methodology, I use a combination of operations research and machine learning/online optimization techniques.

 

Cong Shi

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Cong Shi is an associate professor in the Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering at the University of Michigan College of Engineering. His primary research interest lies in developing efficient and provably-good data-driven algorithms for operations management models, including supply chain management, revenue management, service operations, and human-robot interactions. He received his Ph.D. in Operations Research at MIT in 2012, and his B.S. in Mathematics from the National University of Singapore in 2007.

Brian Lin

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Dr. Brian Lin has 12 years of experience in automotive research at UMTRI after his Ph.D. His current research is focused on mining naturalistic driving data, evaluating driver assistance systems, modeling driver performance and behavior, and estimating driver distraction and workload, using statistical methods, classification, clustering, and survival analysis. His most recent work includes classifying human driver’s decision for a discretionary lane change and traversal at unsignalized intersections, driver’s response to lead vehicle’s movement, and subjective acceptance on automated lane change feature. Dr. Lin also has much experience applying data analytic methods to evaluate automotive system prototypes, including auto-braking, lane departure, driver-state monitoring, electronic head units, car-following and curve-assist systems on level-2 automation, and lane-change and intersection assist on L3 automation on public roads, test tracks, or driving simulators. He is also familiar with the human factors methods to investigate driver distraction, workload, and human-machine interaction with in-vehicle technologies and safety features. He serves as a peer reviewer for Applied Ergonomics, Behavior Research Methods, IEEE Transactions on Intelligent Transportation Systems, IEEE Transactions on Intelligent Vehicles and Transportation Research Part F.

Lubomir Hadjiyski

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Dr. Hadjiyski research interests include computer-aided diagnosis, artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, predictive models, image processing and analysis, medical imaging, and control systems. His current research involves design of decision support systems for detection and diagnosis of cancer in different organs and quantitative analysis of integrated multimodality radiomics, histopathology and molecular biomarkers for treatment response monitoring using AI and machine learning techniques. He also studies the effect of the decision support systems on the physicians’ clinical performance.

Ben Green

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Ben studies the social and political impacts of government algorithms. This work falls into several categories. First, evaluating how people make decisions in collaboration with algorithms. This work involves developing machine learning algorithms and studying how people use them in public sector prediction and decision settings. Second, studying the ethical and political implications of government algorithms. Much of this work draws on STS and legal theory to interrogate topics such as algorithmic fairness, smart cities, and criminal justice risk assessments. Third, developing algorithms for public sector applications. In addition to academic research, Ben spent a year developing data analytics tools as a data scientist for the City of Boston.

Mark Steven Cohen

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In his various roles, he has helped develop several educational programs in Innovation and Entrepreneurial Development (the only one of their kind in the world) for medical students, residents, and faculty as well as co-founding 4 start-up companies (including a consulting group, a pharmaceutical company, a device company, and a digital health startup) to improve the care of surgical patients and patients with cancer. He has given over 80 invited talks both nationally and internationally, written and published over 110 original scientific articles, 12 book chapters, as well as a textbook on “Success in Academic Surgery: Innovation and Entrepreneurship” published in 2019 by Springer-NATURE. His research is focused on drug development and nanoparticle drug delivery for cancer therapeutic development as well as evaluation of circulating tumor cells, tissue engineering for development of thyroid organoids, and evaluating the role of mixed reality technologies, AI and ML in surgical simulation, education and clinical care delivery as well as directing the Center for Surgical Innovation at Michigan. He has been externally funded for 13 consecutive years by donors and grants from Susan G. Komen Foundation, the American Cancer Society, and he currently has funding from three National Institute of Health R-01 grants through the National Cancer Institute. He has served on several grant study sections for the National Science Foundation, the National Institute of Health, the Department of Defense, and the Susan G. Komen Foundation. He also serves of several scientific journal editorial boards and has serves on committees and leadership roles in the Association for Academic Surgery, the Society of University Surgeons and the American Association of Endocrine Surgeons where he was the National Program Chair in 2013. For his innovation efforts, he was awarded a Distinguished Faculty Recognition Award by the University of Michigan in 2019. His clinical interests and national expertise are in the areas of Endocrine Surgery: specifically thyroid surgery for benign and malignant disease, minimally invasive thyroid and parathyroid surgery, and adrenal surgery, as well as advanced Melanoma Surgery including developing and running the hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion program for in transit metastatic melanoma (the only one in the state of Michigan) which is now one of the largest in the nation.