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Fred Feng

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Dr. Feng’s research involves conducting and using naturalistic observational studies to better understand the interactions between motorists and other road users including bicyclists and pedestrians. The goal is to use an evidence-based, data-driven approach that improves bicycling and walking safety and ultimately makes them viable mobility options. A naturalistic study is a valuable and unique research method that provides continuous, high-time-resolution, rich, and objective data about how people drive/ride/walk for their everyday trips in the real world. It also faces challenges from the sheer volume of the data, and as with all observational studies, there are potential confounding factors compared to a randomized laboratory experiment. Data analytic methods can be developed to interpret the behavioral data, make meaningful inferences, and get actionable insights.

Using naturalistic driving data to examine the interactions between motorists and bicyclists

Shan Bao

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My research interests are to improve safety associated with motor-vehicle transportation by addressing both active safety (increased crash avoidance) and passive safety (increased crash protection) issues through the development and application of a wide range of research methodologies. These methodologies are targeted at developing a better understanding and modeling of driver behavior, including physical and cognitive attributes, driver decision-making processes and human intention prediction. I am currently interested in applying data science to study the following topics:
*Driver state detection and prediction;

*Improve user intersection with automated vehicle technologies;

*Communication and interaction between vehicle and vulnerable road users

*Driving style classification

*Human factors issues associated with connected and automated vehicle technologies

Where do drivers look when they are not paying attention to the road

 

Ding Zhao

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Ding Zhao, PhD, is Assistant Research Scientist in the department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering with a secondary appointment in the Robotics Institute at The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Dr. Zhao’s research interests include autonomous vehicles, intelligent/connected transportation, traffic safety, human-machine interaction, rare events analysis, dynamics and control, machine learning, and big data analysis

 

Matthew Kay

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Matthew Kay, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Information, School of Information and Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, College of Engineering, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Kay’s research includes work on communicating uncertainty, usable statistics, and personal informatics. People are increasingly exposed to sensing and prediction in their daily lives (“how many steps did I take today?”, “how long until my bus shows up?”, “how much do I weigh?”). Uncertainty is both inherent to these systems and usually poorly communicated. To build understandable data presentations, we must study how people interpret their data and what goals they have for it, which informs the way that we should communicate results from our models, which in turn determines what models we must use in the first place. Prof. Kay tackles these problems using a multi-faceted approach, including qualitative and quantitative analysis of behavior, building and evaluating interactive systems, and designing and testing visualization techniques. His work draws on approaches from human-computer interaction, information visualization, and statistics to build information visualizations that people can more easily understand along with the models to back those visualizations.

 

Perry Samson

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The capacity to predict student success depends in part on our ability to understand “educationally purposeful” student behaviors and motivations and the relationship between behaviors and motivations and academic achievement. My research focuses on how to collect student behaviors germane to learning at a higher granularity and analyze the relationships between student performance and behaviors.

Ultimately this research is aimed at designing and constructing an “earlier warning system” wherein student guidance is quasi-automated and informed by motivation, background and behaviors and delivered within weeks of the beginning of classes.

Walter S. Lasecki

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My lab creates systems that use a combination of both human and machine computation to solve problems quickly and reliably. We have introduced the idea of continuous real-time crowdsourcing, as well as the ‘crowd agent’ model, which uses computer-mediated groups of people submitting input simultaneously to create a collective intelligence capable of completing tasks better than any constituent member.

Omid Dehzangi

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Omid Dehzangi, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Science, College of Engineering and Computer Science, at the University of Michigan, Dearborn.

Wearable health technology is drawing significant attention for good reasons. The pervasive nature of such systems providing ubiquitous access to the continuous personalized data will transform the way people interact with each other and their environment. The resulting information extracted from these systems will enable emerging applications in healthcare, wellness, emergency response, fitness monitoring, elderly care support, long-term preventive chronic care, assistive care, smart environments, sports, gaming, and entertainment which create many new research opportunities and transform researches from various disciplines into data science which is the methodological terminology for data collection, data management, data analysis, and data visualization. Despite the ground-breaking potentials, there are a number of interesting challenges in order to design and develop wearable medical embedded systems. Due to limited available resources in wearable processing architectures, power-efficiency is demanded to allow unobtrusive and long-term operation of the hardware. Also, the data-intensive nature of continuous health monitoring requires efficient signal processing and data analytic algorithms for real-time, scalable, reliable, accurate, and secure extraction of relevant information from an overwhelmingly large amount of data. Therefore, extensive research in their design, development, and assessment is necessary. Embedded Processing Platform Design The majority of my work concentrates on designing wearable embedded processing platforms in order to shift the conventional paradigms from hospital-centric healthcare with episodic and reactive focus on diseases to patient-centric and home-based healthcare as an alternative segment which demands outstanding specialized design in terms of hardware design, software development, signal processing and uncertainty reduction, data analysis, predictive modeling and information extraction. The objective is to reduce the costs and improve the effectiveness of healthcare by proactive early monitoring, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases (i.e. preventive) as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Embedded processing platform in healthcare

Jie Shen

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One of my research interests is in the digital diagnosis of material damage based on sensors, computational science and numerical analysis with large-scale 3D computed tomography data: (1) Establishment of a multi-resolution transformation rule of material defects. (2) Design of an accurate digital diagnosis method for material damage. (3) Reconstruction of defects in material domains from X-ray CT data . (4) Parallel computation of materials damage. My team also conducted a series of studies for improving the quality of large-scale laser scanning data in reverse engineering and industrial inspection: (1) Detection and removal of non-isolated Outlier Data Clusters (2) Accurate correction of surface data noise of polygonal meshes (3) Denoising of two-dimensional geometric discontinuities.

Another research focus is on the information fusion of large-scale data from autonomous driving. Our research is funded by China Natural Science Foundation with focus on (1) laser-based perception in degraded visual environment, (2) 3D pattern recognition with dynamic, incomplete, noisy point clouds, (3) real-time image processing algorithms in degraded visual environment, and (4) brain-computer interface to predict the state of drivers.

Processing and Analysis of 3D Large-Scale Engineering Data

Processing and Analysis of 3D Large-Scale Engineering Data

Anuj K. Pradhan

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I am interested in the etiology of injuries and fatalities due to motor vehicle crashes from a human factors and behavioral standpoint. I conduct research using a variety of methodologies in order to uncover and disseminate evidence that can contribute to the safe mobility of road users, that can inform policy, and that can lead to technological and educational innovations for improving the road safety record and for reducing injury. My research covers driver behavior and traffic safety with a focus on automated and connected vehicles, young and novice drivers risk behaviors; training and intervention; and, distraction detection and mitigation. My research projects in these areas use various approaches and methodologies including driving simulation, test tracks, naturalistic methods, and observational methods.

Christopher Brooks

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The basis of my work is to make the often invisible traces created by interactions students have with learning technologies available to instructors, technology solutions, and students themselves. This often requires the creation of new novel educational technologies which are designed from the beginning with detailed tracking of user activities. Coupled with machine learning and data mining techniques (e.g. classification, regression, and clustering methods), clickstream data from these technologies is used to build predictive models of student success and to better understand how technology affords benefits in teaching and learning. I’m interested in broadly scaled teaching and learning through Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), how predictive models can be used to understand student success, and the analysis of educational discourse and student writing.