Ivy F. Tso

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My lab researches how the human brain processes social and affective information and how these processes are affected in psychiatric disorders, especially schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. We use behavioral, electrophysiological (EEG), neuroimaging (functional MRI), eye tracking, brain stimulation (TMS, tACS), and computational methods in our studies. One main focus of our work is building and validating computational models based on intensive, high-dimensional subject-level behavior and brain data to explain clinical phenomena, parse mechanisms, and predict patient outcome. The goal is to improve diagnostic and prognostic assessment, and to develop personalized treatments.

Brain activation (in parcellated map) during social and face processing.

Qing Qu

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His research interest lies in the intersection of signal processing, data science, machine learning, and numerical optimization. He is particularly interested in computational methods for learning low-complexity models from high-dimensional data, leveraging tools from machine learning, numerical optimization, and high dimensional geometry, with applications in imaging sciences, scientific discovery, and healthcare. Recently, he is also interested in understanding deep networks through the lens of low-dimensional modeling.

Lubomir Hadjiyski

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Dr. Hadjiyski research interests include computer-aided diagnosis, artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, predictive models, image processing and analysis, medical imaging, and control systems. His current research involves design of decision support systems for detection and diagnosis of cancer in different organs and quantitative analysis of integrated multimodality radiomics, histopathology and molecular biomarkers for treatment response monitoring using AI and machine learning techniques. He also studies the effect of the decision support systems on the physicians’ clinical performance.

Gen Li

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Dr. Gen Li is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biostatistics. He is devoted to developing new statistical methods for analyzing complex biomedical data, including multi-way tensor array data, multi-view data, and compositional data. His methodological research interests include dimension reduction, predictive modeling, association analysis, and functional data analysis. He also has research interests in scientific domains including microbiome and genomics.

Novel tree-guided regularization methods can identify important microbial features at different taxonomic ranks that are predictive of the clinical outcome.

J.J. Prescott

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Broadly, I study legal decision making, including decisions related to crime and employment. I typically use large social science data bases, but also collect my own data using technology or surveys.

Lia Corrales

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My PhD research focused on identifying the size and mineralogical composition of interstellar dust through X-ray imaging of dust scattering halos to X-ray spectroscopy of bright objects to study absorption from intervening material. Over the course of my PhD I also developed an open source, object oriented approach to computing extinction properties of particles in Python that allows the user to change the scattering physics models and composition properties of dust grains very easily. In many cases, the signal I look for from interstellar dust requires evaluating the observational data on the 1-5% level. This has required me to develop a deep understanding of both the instrument and the counting statistics (because modern-day X-ray instruments are photon counting tools). My expertise led me to a postdoc at MIT, where I developed techniques to obtain high resolution X-ray spectra from low surface brightness (high background) sources imaged with the Chandra X-ray Observatory High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer. I pioneered these techniques in order to extract and analyze the high resolution spectrum of Sgr A*, our Galaxy’s central supermassive black hole (SMBH), producing a legacy dataset with a precision that will not be replaceable for decades. This dataset will be used to understand why Sgr A* is anomalously inactive, giving us clues to the connection between SMBH activity and galactic evolution. In order to publish the work, I developed an open source software package, pyXsis (github.com/eblur/pyxsis) in order to model the low signal-to-noise spectrum of Sgr A* simultaneously with a non-physical parameteric model of the background spectrum (Corrales et al., 2020). As a result of my vocal advocacy for Python compatible software tools and a modular approach to X-ray data analysis, I became Chair for HEACIT (which stands for “High Energy Astrophysics Codes, Interfaces, and Tools”), a new self-appointed working group of X-ray software engineers and early career scientists interested in developing tools for future X-ray observatories. We are working to identify science cases that high energy astronomers find difficult to support with the current software libraries, provide a central and publicly available online forum for tutorials and discussion of current software libraries, and develop a set of best practices for X-ray data analysis. My research focus is now turning to exoplanet atmospheres, where I hope to measure absorption from molecules and aerosols in the UV. Utilizing UM access to the Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory, I work to observe the dip in a star’s brightness caused by occultation (transit) from a foreground planet. Transit depths are typically <1%, and telescopes like Swift were not originally designed with transit measurements (i.e., this level of precision) in mind. As a result, this research strongly depends on robust methods of scientific inference from noisy datasets.

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As a graduate student, I attended some of the early “Python in Astronomy” workshops. While there, I wrote Jupyter Notebook tutorials that helped launch the Astropy Tutorials project (github.com/astropy/astropy-tutorials), which expanded to Learn Astropy (learn.astropy.org), for which I am a lead developer. Since then, I have also become a leader within the larger Astropy collaboration. I have helped develop the Astropy Project governance structure, hired maintainers, organized workshops, and maintained an AAS presence for the Astropy Project and NumFocus (the non-profit umbrella organization that works to sustain open source software communities in scientific computing) for the last several years. As a woman of color in a STEM field, I work to clear a path by teaching the skills I have learned along the way to other underrepresented groups in STEM. This year I piloted WoCCode (Women of Color Code), an online network and webinar series for women from minoritized backgrounds to share expertise and support each other in contributing to open source software communities.

Xianglei Huang

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Prof. Huang is specialized in satellite remote sensing, atmospheric radiation, and climate modeling. Optimization, pattern analysis, and dimensional reduction are extensively used in his research for explaining observed spectrally resolved infrared spectra, estimating geophysical parameters from such hyperspectral observations, and deducing human influence on the climate in the presence of natural variability of the climate system. His group has also developed a deep-learning model to make a data-driven solar forecast model for use in the renewable energy sector.

Nicholas Henderson

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My research primarily focuses on the following main themes: 1) development of methods for risk prediction and analyzing treatment effect heterogeneity, 2) Bayesian nonparametrics and Bayesian machine learning methods with a particular emphasis on the use of these methods in the context of survival analysis, 3) statistical methods for analyzing heterogeneity in risk-benefit profiles and for supporting individualized treatment decisions, and 4) development of empirical Bayes and shrinkage methods for high-dimensional statistical applications. I am also broadly interested in collaborative work in biomedical research with a focus on the application of statistics in cancer research.

Gary Luker

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We use a variety of quantitative imaging methods, ranging from single cells to clinical studies, to investigate cancer signaling and response to therapy over space and time. We develop image analysis methods to extract data from thousands of single cells over time and voxel-wise measurements of imaging parameters. We also use bulk and single-cell RNA sequencing to investigate heterogeneity among cancer cells and changes induced by intercellular interactions. A current goal of our ongoing work is to merge RNA sequencing and imaging data to understand cell decision making in cancer. We collaborate with investigators using machine learning and computational modeling approaches to inform cell signaling and resultant behaviors in tumor growth and metastasis.

Lana Garmire

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My research interest lies in applying data science for actionable transformation of human health from the bench to bedside. Current research focus areas include cutting edge single-cell sequencing informatics and genomics; precision medicine through integration of multi-omics data types; novel modeling and computational methods for biomarker research; public health genomics. I apply my biomedical informatics and analytical expertise to study diseases such as cancers, as well the impact of pregnancy/early life complications on later life diseases.