Joyce Chai

Joyce Chai

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My research interests are in the area of natural language processing, situated dialogue agents, and artificial intelligence. I’m particularly interested in language processing that is sensorimotor-grounded, pragmatically-rich, and cognitively-motivated. My current work explores the intersection of language, vision, and robotics to facilitate situated communication with embodied agents and applies different types of data (e.g., capturing human behaviors in communication, perception, and, action) to advance core intelligence of AI.

Dimitra Panagou

Dimitra Panagou

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Dimitra Panagou’s research lies in the areas of multi-agent systems and control, with applications in multi-robot/vehicle systems. She is particularly interested in establishing safety and resilience against adversity and uncertainty for multi-robot/vehicle systems using techniques from (networked) control theory, estimation theory, and machine learning.

Thuy Le

Thuy Le

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Dr. Le is an assistant research scientist at the University of Michigan Department of Health Management and Policy. Dr Le is also a member of the UM/Georgetown TCORS Center for the Assessment of Tobacco Regulations (CAsToR). Dr. Le is interested in mathematical modeling for cancer- and tobacco-related problems, and machine-learning applications in tobacco regulatory science. Dr. Le has developed mathematical models to evaluate the benefits and harms of breast cancer mammography and predict the number of white blood cells during acute lymphoblastic maintenance therapy in children. Dr. Le’s recent work focuses on employing mathematical models to quantify the burden of menthol cigarettes on public health and estimate the smoking cessation rate. Dr. Le is working on applying machine learning techniques to predict and understand smoking behaviors.

Krishna Garikipati

Krishna Garikipati

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My research is in computational science and scientific artificial intelligence, including machine learning and data-driven modelling. I have applied these approaches to physics discovery by model inference, scale bridging, partial differential equation solvers, representation of complexity and constructing reduced-order models of high-dimensional systems. My research is motivated by and applied to phenomena in bioengineering, biophysics, mathematical biology and materials physics. Of specific interest to me are patterning and morphogenesis in developmental biology, cellular biophysics, soft matter and mechano-chemical phase transformations in materials. More fundamentally, the foundations of my research lie in applied mathematics, numerical methods and scientific computing.

A schematic illustrating the range of ML methods comprising the mechanoChemML code framework for data-driven computational material physics.

Jordan McKay

Jordan McKay

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He/Him

Jordan McKay is a Project Associate Manager at MIDAS. An Ann Arbor native, Jordan received his Bachelors in Computer Science from University of Michigan, and his Masters in Information at the University of Michigan School of Information. Outside of business hours, Jordan also works as a conductor, concert pianist, and Music Director with a number of organizations in the Ann Arbor area.

In addition to his duties administrating the day-to-day operations for MIDAS, its website, its events, and its part-time staff, Jordan is an engaged member of the data science community. Jordan is a determined advocate for ethical AI, data sovereignty, accessibility, digital privacy, and humane information system design, and is proud to be a member of a team that is working to make data a force for good in our society.

Matias del Campo

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The goal of this project is the creation of a crucial building block of the research on AI and Architecture – a database of 3D models necessary to successfully run Artificial Neural Networks in 3D. This database is part of the first stepping-stones for the research at the AR2IL (Architecture and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory), an interdisciplinary Laboratory between Architecture (represented by Taubman College of Architecture of Urban Planning), Michigan Robotics, and the CS Department of the University of Michigan. A Laboratory dedicated to research specializing in the development of applications of Artificial Intelligence in the field of Architecture and Urban Planning. This area of inquiry has experienced an explosive growth in recent years (triggered in part by research conducted at UoM), as evidenced for example by the growth in papers dedicated to AI applications in architecture, as well as in the investment of the industry in this area. The research funded by this proposal would secure the leading position of Taubman College and the University of Michigan in the field of AI and Architecture. This proposal would also address the current lack of 3D databases that are specifically designed for Architecture applications.

The project “Generali Center’ presents itself as an experiment in the combination of Machine Learning processes capable of learning the salient features of a specific architecture style – in this case, Brutalism- in order to generatively perform interpolations between the data points of the provided dataset. These images serve as the basis of a pixel projection approach that results in a 3D model.

Stefanus Jasin

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My research focus the application and development of new algorithms for solving complex business analytics problems. Applications vary from revenue management, dynamic pricing, marketing analytics, to retail logistics. In terms of methodology, I use a combination of operations research and machine learning/online optimization techniques.

 

Ivy F. Tso

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My lab researches how the human brain processes social and affective information and how these processes are affected in psychiatric disorders, especially schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. We use behavioral, electrophysiological (EEG), neuroimaging (functional MRI), eye tracking, brain stimulation (TMS, tACS), and computational methods in our studies. One main focus of our work is building and validating computational models based on intensive, high-dimensional subject-level behavior and brain data to explain clinical phenomena, parse mechanisms, and predict patient outcome. The goal is to improve diagnostic and prognostic assessment, and to develop personalized treatments.

Brain activation (in parcellated map) during social and face processing.

Joshua Welch

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Our research aims to address fundamental problems in both biomedical research and computer science by developing new tools tailored to rapidly emerging single-cell omic technologies. Broadly, we seek to understand what genes define the complement of cell types and cell states within healthy tissue, how cells differentiate to their final fates, and how dysregulation of genes within specific cell types contributes to human disease. As computational method developers, we seek to both employ and advance the methods of machine learning, particularly for unsupervised analysis of high-dimensional data. We have particular expertise in manifold learning, matrix factorization, and deep learning approaches.