Thomas Valley

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Dr. Valley’s research focuses on understanding and improving decision-making in the intensive care unit (ICU). His primary line of research seeks to identify the patients most likely to benefit from intensive care, allowing clinicians to safely triage patients between the ICU and the general ward. Ultimately, he hopes to identify ICU-based therapies that can be transferred to the general ward to improve hospital efficiency and reduce healthcare costs. Dr. Valley’s research interests also include enhancing diagnosis in critical illness, improving the ICU experience for family members of ICU patients, and reducing barriers to cost-effective pulmonary and critical care.

Gregory S. Miller

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Greg’s research primarily investigates information flow in financial markets and the actions of agents in those markets – both consumers and producers of that information. His approach draws on theory from the social sciences (economics, psychology and sociology) combined with large data sets from diverse sources and a variety of data science approaches. Most projects combine data from across multiple sources, including commercial data bases, experimentally created data and extracting data from sources designed for other uses (commercial media, web scrapping, cellphone data etc.). In addition to a wide range of econometric and statistical methods, his work has included applying machine learning , textual analysis, mining social media, processes for missing data and combining mixed media.

Jim Omartian

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My research explores the interplay between corporate decisions and employee actions. I currently use anonymized mobile device data to observe individual behaviors, and employ both unsupervised and supervised machine learning techniques.

Andrew J. Admon, MD, MPH, MSc

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I am a pulmonary and critical care physician who is passionate about improving critical care delivery by applying advanced methods for causal inference to observational data. My prior work has leveraged real-world data clinical and administrative data to study the epidemiology of critical illness, the organization of critical care, and health care financing.

My current work leverages real-world clinical data to understand whether and how care team fragmentation (transitions of physicians and other providers while a patient is still hospitalized) influences clinical outcomes like survival and recovery. Answering these questions correctly requires methods that are attentive to the complex causal structure underlying the relationship, depicted here. It features time-varying exposures (A), confounders (L), and mediators (M), all of which can influence clinical outcomes (Y). Arrows in the figure identify directional (i.e., causal) relationships between variables.

Nancy Fleischer

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Dr. Fleischer’s research focuses on how the broader socioeconomic and policy environments impact health disparities and the health of vulnerable populations, in the U.S. and around the world. Through this research, her group employs various analytic techniques to examine data at multiple levels (country-level, state-level, and neighborhood-level), emphasizing the role of structural influences on individual health. Her group applies advanced epidemiologic, statistical, and econometric methods to this research, including survey methodology, longitudinal data analysis, hierarchical modeling, causal inference, systems science, and difference-in-difference analysis. Dr. Fleischer leads two NCI-funded projects focused on the impact of tobacco control policies on health equity in the U.S.

Gary L. Freed

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I conduct a broad range of research on health policy and health economics focused on children. I will be launching a program on child health equity in the fall of 2020.

Aditi Misra

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Transportation is the backbone of the urban mobility system and is one of the greatest sources of environmental emissions and pollutions. Making urban transportation efficient, equitable and sustainable is the main focus of my research. My students and I analyze small scale survey data as well as large scale spatiotemporal data to identify travel behavior trends and patterns at a disaggregate level using econometric methods, which we then scale up to the population level through predictive and statistical modeling. We also design our own data collection methods and instruments, be it a network of smart devices or stated preference experiments. Our expertise lies in identifying latent constructs that influence decisions and choices, which in turn dictate demands on the systems and subsystems. We use our expertise to design incentives and policy suggestions that can help promote sustainable and equitable multimodal transportation systems. Our team also uses data analytics, particularly classification and pattern recognition algorithms, to analyze crash context data and develop safety-critical scenarios for automated and connected vehicle (CAV) deployment. We have developed an online game based on such scenarios to promote safe shared mobility among teenagers and young adults and plan to expand research in that area. We are also currently expanding our research to explore the use of NN in context information synthesis.

This is a project where we used classification and Bayesian models to identify scenarios that are risky for pedestrians and bicyclists. We then developed an online game based on those scenarios for middle schoolers so that they are better prepared for shared road conflicts.

Misha Teplitskiy

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My research is at the intersection of Science of Science + Sociology of Organizations + Computational Social Science. I study how social and organizational factors affect scientific discovery. I am especially interested in evaluation practices in science, and whether they promote or stifle innovation. My approach relies primarily on field experiments — interventions in scientific competitions and other settings — and applying computational tools to large-scale observational data.

Current research projects include:
1. Cumulative advantage in science: Do metrics like citation counts and impact factors proxy quality and influence, or help create them?
2. Biases in expert evaluation: Do groups of experts make decisions differently from individuals?
3. Science and the media: What research is picked up by the media, and how is it covered?

Showing how often a paper has been cited causes scientists to perceive it as of lower quality, unless that paper is among the 10% most highly cited.

Shu-Fang Shih

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Shu-Fang Shih, Ph.D., has a diverse background in public health, business administration, risk management and insurance, and actuarial science. Her research has focused on design, implementation, and evaluation of theory-based health programs for children, adolescents, pregnant women, and older adults in various settings. In addition, she used econometric methods, psychometric, and other statistical methods to examine various health issues among children, adolescent, emerging adulthood, pregnant women, and the older adults. She is particularly interested in designing effective ways to align public health, social services, and healthcare to achieve the goal of family-centered and integrated/coordinated care for the family.