Photograph of Nate Sanders

Nate Sanders

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My research interests are broad, but generally center on the causes and consequences of biodiversity loss at local, regional, and global scales with an explicit focus on global change drivers. Our work has been published in Science, Nature, Science Advances, Global Change Biology, PNAS, AREES, TREE, and Ecology Letters among other journals. We are especially interested in using AI and machine learning to explore broad-scale patterns of biodiversity and phenotypic variation, mostly in ants.

Zheng Song

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I received my second PhD in Computer Science (with a focus on distributed systems and software engineering) from Virginia Tech USA in 2020, and the first PhD (with a focus on wireless networking and mobile computing) from Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications China in 2015. I received the Best Paper Award from IEEE International Conference on Edge Computing in 2019. My ongoing research projects include measuring the data quality of web services and using federated learning to improve indoor localization accuracy.

Matias del Campo

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The goal of this project is the creation of a crucial building block of the research on AI and Architecture – a database of 3D models necessary to successfully run Artificial Neural Networks in 3D. This database is part of the first stepping-stones for the research at the AR2IL (Architecture and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory), an interdisciplinary Laboratory between Architecture (represented by Taubman College of Architecture of Urban Planning), Michigan Robotics, and the CS Department of the University of Michigan. A Laboratory dedicated to research specializing in the development of applications of Artificial Intelligence in the field of Architecture and Urban Planning. This area of inquiry has experienced an explosive growth in recent years (triggered in part by research conducted at UoM), as evidenced for example by the growth in papers dedicated to AI applications in architecture, as well as in the investment of the industry in this area. The research funded by this proposal would secure the leading position of Taubman College and the University of Michigan in the field of AI and Architecture. This proposal would also address the current lack of 3D databases that are specifically designed for Architecture applications.

The project “Generali Center’ presents itself as an experiment in the combination of Machine Learning processes capable of learning the salient features of a specific architecture style – in this case, Brutalism- in order to generatively perform interpolations between the data points of the provided dataset. These images serve as the basis of a pixel projection approach that results in a 3D model.

Elizabeth F. S. Roberts

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“Neighborhood Environments as Socio-Techno-bio Systems: Water Quality, Public Trust, and Health in Mexico City (NESTSMX)” is an NSF-funded multi-year collaborative interdisciplinary project that brings together experts in environmental engineering, anthropology, and environmental health from the University of Michigan and the Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública. The PI is Elizabeth Roberts (anthropology), and the co-PIs are Brisa N. Sánchez (biostatistics), Martha M Téllez-Rojo (public health), Branko Kerkez (environmental engineering), and Krista Rule Wigginton (civil and environmental engineering). Our overarching goal for NESTSMX is to develop methods for understanding neighborhoods as “socio-techno-bio systems” and to understand how these systems relate to people’s trust in (or distrust of) their water. In the process, we will collectively contribute to our respective fields of study while we learn how to merge efforts from different disciplinary backgrounds.
NESTSMX works with families living in Mexico City, that participate in an ongoing longitudinal birth-cohort chemical-exposure study (ELEMENT (Early Life Exposures in Mexico to ENvironmental Toxicants, U-M School of Public Health). Our research involves ethnography and environmental engineering fieldwork which we will combine with biomarker data previously gathered by ELEMENT. Our focus will be on the infrastructures and social structures that move water in and out of neighborhoods, households, and bodies.

Testing Real-Time Domestic Water Sensors in Mexico City

Testing Real-Time Domestic Water Sensors in Mexico City

Fabian Pfeffer

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My research investigates social inequality and its maintenance across time and generations. Current projects focus on wealth inequality and its consequences for the next generation, the institutional context of social mobility processes and educational inequality in the United States and other industrialized countries. I also help expand the social science data infrastructure and quantitative methods needed to address questions on inequality and mobility. I serve as Principal Investigator of the Wealth and Mobility (WAM) study as well as Co-Investigator of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID). As such, my research draws on and helps construct nationally representative survey data as well as full-population administrative data. My methodological work has been focused on causal inference, multiple imputation, and measurement error.

Deena Costa

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Dr. Costa’s goal is to maximize survival and minimize morbidity for mechanically ventilated adults. She accomplishes this through her research on the organization and management of critical care. Specifically, her work identifies key structural and functional characteristics of ICU interprofessional teams that can be leveraged to improve the delivery of high quality, complex care to mechanically ventilated patients. She is a trained health services researcher with clinical expertise in adult critical care nursing. Her work care has been published in leading journals such as JAMA, Chest, and Critical Care Medicine. Her current research examines ICU teamwork and patient outcomes, linking individual clinicians to individual patients using the Electronic Health Record, and using qualitative approaches to understand how to improve ICU teams. Her research has focused on ICU clinician staffing, well-being and psychological outcomes of ICU clinicians as a way to improve care and outcomes of ICU patients.

Amie Gordon

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My research focuses on understanding the social cognitive, affective, and biological factors that shape our closest relationships. I am particularly interested in identifying factors that help romantic couples and families maintain high quality relationships. My work draws upon a variety of methods, including experimental, observational, naturalistic (e.g., daily experience), and physiological, to capture people at multiple levels in a variety of social situations. I frequently gather dyadic longitudinal data in order to understand how relationship partners influence each other in the moment and over time.

J.J. Prescott

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Broadly, I study legal decision making, including decisions related to crime and employment. I typically use large social science data bases, but also collect my own data using technology or surveys.

Wentao Wang

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Dr. Wentao Wang is currently a research faculty in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States. He obtained his Ph.D. degree in 2016 from Harbin Institute of Technology, supervised by Prof. Hui Li and Prof. Jerome P. Lynch