Anthony Vanky

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Anthony Vanky develops and applies data science and computational methods to design, plan, evaluate cities, emphasizing their applications to urban planning and design. Broadly, his work focuses on the domains of transportation and human mobility; social behaviors and urban space; policy evaluation; quantitative social sciences; and the evaluation of urban form. Through this work, he has extensively collaborated with public and private partners. In addition, he considers creative approaches toward data visualization, public engagement and advocacy, and research methods.

 

Anthony Vanky’s Cityways project analyzed 2.2 million trips from 135,000 people over one year to understand the factors that influence outdoor pedestrian path choice. Factors considered included weather, urban morphology, businesses, topography, traffic, the presence of green spaces, among others.

Wenhao Sun

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We are interested in resolving outstanding fundamental scientific problems that impede the computational materials design process. Our group uses high-throughput density functional theory, applied thermodynamics, and materials informatics to deepen our fundamental understanding of synthesis-structure-property relationships, while exploring new chemical spaces for functional technological materials. These research interests are driven by the practical goal of the U.S. Materials Genome Initiative to accelerate materials discovery, but whose resolution requires basic fundamental research in synthesis science, inorganic chemistry, and materials thermodynamics.

Robert Manduca

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Professor Manduca’s research focuses on urban and regional economic development, asking why some cities and regions prosper while others decline, how federal policy influences urban fortunes, and how neighborhood social and economic conditions shape life outcomes. He studies these topics using computer simulations, spatial clustering methods, network analysis, and data visualization.

In other work he explores the consequences of rising income inequality for various aspects of life in the United States, using descriptive methods and simulations applied to Census microdata. This research has shown how rising inequality has lead directly to lower rates of upward mobility and increases in the racial income gap.

9.9.2020 MIDAS Faculty Research Pitch Video.

Screenshot from “Where Are The Jobs?” visualization mapping every job in the United States based on the unemployment insurance records from the Census LODES data. http://robertmanduca.com/projects/jobs.html

Yulia Sevryugina

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Study of Pandemic Publishing: How Scholarly Literature is Affected by COVID-19 Pandemic
This project addresses the quality of recently published COVID-19 publications. With the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers publish a lot their research as preprints. And while preprints are an important development in scholarly publishing, they are works in progress that need further refinement to become a more rigorous final product. Scholarly publishers are also taking initiatives to accelerate publication process, for example, by asking reviewers to curtail requests for additional experiments upon revisions. Sacrificing rigor for haste inevitably increases the likelihood of article correction and retraction, leading to spread of false information within supposedly trustworthy sources that have a peer-reviewing process in place to ensure proper verification. I study the quality of COVID-19 related scholarly works by using CADRE’s datasets to identify signs of incoherency, irreproducibility, and haste.

9.9.2020 MIDAS Faculty Research Pitch Video.

Lucia Cevidanes

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We have developed and tested machine learning approaches to integrate quantitative markers for diagnosis and assessment of progression of TMJ OA, as well as extended the capabilities of 3D Slicer4 into web-based tools and disseminated open source image analysis tools. Our aims use data processing and in-depth analytics combined with learning using privileged information, integrated feature selection, and testing the performance of longitudinal risk predictors. Our long term goals are to improve diagnosis and risk prediction of TemporoMandibular Osteoarthritis in future multicenter studies.

The Spectrum of Data Science for Diagnosis of Osteoarthritis of the Temporomandibular Joint

Joshua Stein

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As a board-certified ophthalmologist and glaucoma specialist, I have more than 15 years of clinical experience caring for patients with different types and complexities of glaucoma. In addition to my clinical experience, as a health services researcher, I have developed experience and expertise in several disciplines including performing analyses using large health care claims databases to study utilization and outcomes of patients with ocular diseases, racial and other disparities in eye care, associations between systemic conditions or medication use and ocular diseases. I have learned the nuances of various data sources and ways to maximize our use of these data sources to answer important and timely questions. Leveraging my background in HSR with new skills in bioinformatics and precision medicine, over the past 2-3 years I have been developing and growing the Sight Outcomes Research Collaborative (SOURCE) repository, a powerful tool that researchers can tap into to study patients with ocular diseases. My team and I have spent countless hours devising ways of extracting electronic health record data from Clarity, cleaning and de-identifying the data, and making it linkable to ocular diagnostic test data (OCT, HVF, biometry) and non-clinical data. Now that we have successfully developed such a resource here at Kellogg, I am now collaborating with colleagues at > 2 dozen academic ophthalmology departments across the country to assist them with extracting their data in the same format and sending it to Kellogg so that we can pool the data and make it accessible to researchers at all of the participating centers for research and quality improvement studies. I am also actively exploring ways to integrate data from SOURCE into deep learning and artificial intelligence algorithms, making use of SOURCE data for genotype-phenotype association studies and development of polygenic risk scores for common ocular diseases, capturing patient-reported outcome data for the majority of eye care recipients, enhancing visualization of the data on easy-to-access dashboards to aid in quality improvement initiatives, and making use of the data to enhance quality of care, safety, efficiency of care delivery, and to improve clinical operations. .

Yuri Zhukov

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My research focuses on the causes, dynamics and outcomes of conflict, at the international and local levels. My methodological areas of interest include spatial statistics, mathematical/computational modeling and text analysis.

Map/time-series/network plot, showing the flow of information across battles in World War II. Z axis is time, X and Y axes are longitude and latitude, polygons are locations of battles, red lines are network edges linking battles involving the same combatants. Source: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0020818318000358

Jim Omartian

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My research explores the interplay between corporate decisions and employee actions. I currently use anonymized mobile device data to observe individual behaviors, and employ both unsupervised and supervised machine learning techniques.

Jana Hirschtick

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I am a social epidemiologist with expertise in data collection, analysis, and translation. My research is focused on quantifying health inequities at the individual, community, and national level and examining how policy and social factors impact these inequities. My experience has spanned academic, clinical, and community settings, providing me with a unique perspective on the value and need for epidemiologic research and dissemination in multiple contexts. My current work focuses on the health equity impact of tobacco product use as part of the University of Michigan Tobacco Center of Regulatory Science, the Center for the Assessment of Tobacco Regulations (CAsToR). I am examining sociodemographic inequities in polytobacco use (the use of multiple tobacco products) across multiple nationally representative datasets. I am also an active member of CAsToR’s Data Analysis and Dissemination (DAD) Core. Additionally, I am collaborating with colleagues in Chicago to disseminate findings from a community-level probability survey of 10 Chicago communities, of which I served as Co-PI while working at a hospital system in Chicago. We continue to publish on the unique survey process, sharing our community-driven approach to conducting research and disseminating findings in partnership with surveyed communities.

Nancy Fleischer

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Dr. Fleischer’s research focuses on how the broader socioeconomic and policy environments impact health disparities and the health of vulnerable populations, in the U.S. and around the world. Through this research, her group employs various analytic techniques to examine data at multiple levels (country-level, state-level, and neighborhood-level), emphasizing the role of structural influences on individual health. Her group applies advanced epidemiologic, statistical, and econometric methods to this research, including survey methodology, longitudinal data analysis, hierarchical modeling, causal inference, systems science, and difference-in-difference analysis. Dr. Fleischer leads two NCI-funded projects focused on the impact of tobacco control policies on health equity in the U.S.