Birhanu Eshete

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I study cybercrime using data-driven methods to analyze, characterize, and measure the infrastructure and modus operandi used by criminal activities on the Internet. In particular, I focus on collection, analysis, and semantic characterization of cyber threat intelligence that comes in many shapes and forms (e.g., natural language, network traffic, system audit logs). The ultimate goal is to learn insights that will inform decisions on building robust defense against online criminal activities that involve threats such as ransomware, exploit kits, and botnets. To achieve these goals, I find graph theory and analytics, machine learning (deep learning), longitudinal analysis, and causality inference to be the natural methods. I also study the training and deployment of cyber threat classification/prediction systems in adversarial settings.

From behavioral fingerprinting and detection of cybercrime toolkits to analytics and detection of online cyber threats; from semantic characterization of cyber threat intelligence to detection and forensics of advanced cyber attacks, machine learning, graph theory and analytics, graph isomorphism, and causal inference serve as the core ingredients to build robust defense against cyber threats.

John E Marcotte

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John E. Marcotte, PhD is a statistician and data security expert. His research concerns data sharing, data security, data management, disclosure, health policy, nursing staffing and patient outcomes. He has over 25 years of experience implementing computing systems and performing quantitative analysis. During his career, Marcotte has served as a quantitative researcher, biostatistician, data archivist, data security officer and computing director. Among Marcotte’s statistical fortes are linear and logistic regression, survival analysis and sampling while his computing specialties include secure systems, high performance systems and numerical methods. He has collaborated with social and natural scientists as well as nurses and physicians. Marcotte regularly presents at professional conferences and contributes to invited panels on data security and disclosure. He has formal training in Demography, Statistics and Computer Science.

Research Data Security Options

Aaron A. King

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The long temporal and large spatial scales of ecological systems make controlled experimentation difficult and the amassing of informative data challenging and expensive. The resulting sparsity and noise are major impediments to scientific progress in ecology, which therefore depends on efficient use of data. In this context, it has in recent years been recognized that the onetime playthings of theoretical ecologists, mathematical models of ecological processes, are no longer exclusively the stuff of thought experiments, but have great utility in the context of causal inference. Specifically, because they embody scientific questions about ecological processes in sharpest form—making precise, quantitative, testable predictions—the rigorous confrontation of process-based models with data accelerates the development of ecological understanding. This is the central premise of my research program and the common thread of the work that goes on in my laboratory.

Nicholson Price

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I study how law shapes innovation in the life sciences, with a substantial focus on big data and artificial intelligence in medicine. I write about the intellectual property incentives and protections for data and AI algorithms, the privacy issues with wide-scale health- and health-related data collection, the medical malpractice implications of AI in medicine, and how FDA should regulate the use of medical AI.

Suleyman Uludag

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My research spans security, privacy, and optimization of data collection particularly as applied to the Smart Grid, an augmented and enhanced paradigm for the conventional power grid. I am particularly interested in optimization approaches that take a notion of security and/or privacy into the modeling explicitly. At the intersection of the Intelligent Transportation Systems, Smart Grid, and Smart Cities, I am interested in data privacy and energy usage in smart parking lots. Protection of data and availability, especially under assault through a Denial-of-Service attacks, represents another dimension of my area of research interests. I am working on developing data privacy-aware bidding applications for the Smart Grid Demand Response systems without relying on trusted third parties. Finally, I am interested in educational and pedagogical research about teaching computer science, Smart Grid, cyber security, and data privacy.

This figure shows the data collection model I used in developing a practical and secure Machine-to-Machine data collection protocol for the Smart Grid.

This figure shows the data collection model I used in developing a practical and secure
Machine-to-Machine data collection protocol for the Smart Grid.

Trivellore E. Raghunathan

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Dr. Raghunathan’s primary research interest is in developing methods for dealing with missing data in sample surveys and in epidemiological studies. The methods are motivated from a Bayesian perspective but with desirable frequency or repeated sampling properties. The analysis of incomplete data from practical sample surveys poses additional problems due to extensive stratification, clustering of units and unequal probabilities of selection. The model-based approach provides a framework to incorporate all the relevant sampling design features in dealing with unit and item nonresponse in sample surveys. There are important computational challenges in implementing these methods in practical surveys. He has developed SAS based software, IVEware, for performing multiple imputation analysis and the analysis of complex survey data. Raghunathan’s other research interests include Bayesian methods, methods for small area estimation, combining information from multiple surveys, measurement error models, longitudinal data analysis, privacy, confidentiality and disclosure limitations and statistical methods for epidemiological studies. His applied interests include cardiovascular epidemiology, social epidemiology, health disparity, health care utilization, and social and economic sciences. Raghunathan is also involved in the Survey Methodology Program at the Institute for Social Research, a multidisciplinary team of sociologists, statisticians and psychologists, provides an opportunity to address methodological issues in: nonresponse, interviewer behavior and its impact on the results, response or measurement bias and errors, noncoverage, respondent cognition, privacy and confidentiality issues and data archiving. The Survey Methodology Program has a graduate program offering masters and doctoral degrees in survey methodology.

Jason Owen-Smith

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Professor Owen-Smith conducts research on the collective dynamics of large scale networks and their implications for scientific and technological innovation and surgical care. He is the executive director of the Institution for Research on Innovation and Science (IRIS, http://iris.isr.umich.edu).  IRIS is a national consortium of research universities who share data and support infrastructure designed to support research to understand, explain, and eventually improve the public value of academic research and research training.

One year snapshot of the collaboration network of a single large research university campus. Nodes are individuals employed on sponsored project grants, ties represent copayment on the same grant account in the same year. Ties are valued to reflect the number of grants in common. Node size is proportional to a simple measure of betweenness centrality and node color represents the results of a simple (walktrip) community finding algorithm. The image was created in Gephi.

One year snapshot of the collaboration network of a single large research university campus. Nodes are individuals employed on sponsored project grants, ties represent copayment on the same grant account in the same year. Ties are valued to reflect the number of grants in common. Node size is proportional to a simple measure of betweenness centrality and node color represents the results of a simple (walktrip) community finding algorithm. The image was created in Gephi.

Qiang Zhu

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Dr. Zhu’s group conducts research on various topics, ranging from foundational methodologies to challenging applications, in data science. In particular, the group has been investigating the fundamental issues and techniques for supporting various types of queries (including range queries, box queries, k-NN queries, and hybrid queries) on large datasets in a non-ordered discrete data space. A number of novel indexing and searching techniques that utilize the unique characteristics of an NDDS are developed. The group has also been studying the issues and techniques for storing and searching large scale k-mer datasets for various genome sequence analysis applications in bioinformatics. A virtual approximate store approach to supporting repetitive big data in genome sequence analyses and several new sequence analysis techniques are suggested. In addition, the group has been researching the challenges and methods for processing and optimizing a new type of so-called progressive queries that are formulated on the fly by a user in multiple steps. Such queries are widely used in many application domains including e-commerce, social media, business intelligence, and decision support. The other research topics that have been studied by the group include streaming data processing, self-management database, spatio-temporal data indexing, data privacy, Web information management, and vehicle drive-through wireless services.

Michael Elliott

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Michael Elliott is Professor of Biostatistics at the University of Michigan School of Public Health and Research Scientist at the Institute for Social Research. Dr. Elliott’s statistical research interests focus around the broad topic of “missing data,” including the design and analysis of sample surveys, casual and counterfactual inference, and latent variable models. He has worked closely with collaborators in injury research, pediatrics, women’s health, and the social determinants of physical and mental health. Dr. Elliott serves as an Associate Editor for the Journal of the American Statistical Association. He is currently serving as a co-investigator on the MIDAS-affiliated Reinventing Urban Transportation and Mobility project, working to develop methods to improve the representativeness of naturalistic driving data.