Jodyn Platt

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Our team leads research on the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) of learning health systems and related enterprises. Our research uses mixed methods to understand policies and practices that make data science methods (data collection and curation, AI, computable algorithms) trustworthy for patients, providers, and the public. Our work engages multiple stakeholders including providers and health systems, as well as the general public and minoritized communities on issues such as AI-enabled clinical decision support, data sharing and privacy, and consent for data use in precision oncology.

J. Alex Halderman

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My research focuses on computer security and privacy, with an emphasis on problems that broadly impact society and public policy. Topics that interest me include software security, network security, data privacy, anonymity, election cybersecurity, censorship resistance, computer forensics, ethics, and cybercrime. I’m also interested in the interaction of technology with politics and international affairs.

Ranjan Pal

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Cyber-security is a complex and multi-dimensional research field. My research style comprises an inter-disciplinary (primarily rooted in economics, econometrics, data science (AI/ML/Bayesian and Frequentist Statistics), game theory, and network science) investigation of major socially pressing issues impacting the quality of cyber-risk management in modern networked and distributed engineering systems such as IoT-driven critical infrastructures, cloud-based service networks, and app-based systems (e.g., mobile commerce, smart homes) to name a few. I take delight in proposing data-driven, rigorous, and interdisciplinary solutions to both, existing fundamental challenges that pose a practical bottleneck to (cost) effective cyber-risk management, and futuristic cyber-security and privacy issues that might plague modern (networked) engineering systems. I strongly strive for originality, practical significance, and mathematical rigor in my solutions. One of my primary end goals is to conceptually get arms around complex, multi-dimensional information security and privacy problems in a way that helps, informs, and empowers practitioners and policy makers to take the right steps in making the cyber-space more secure.

Xu Shi

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My methodological research focus on developing statistical methods for routinely collected healthcare databases such as electronic health records (EHR) and claims data. I aim to tackle the unique challenges that arise from the secondary use of real-world data for research purposes. Specifically, I develop novel causal inference methods and semiparametric efficiency theory that harness the full potential of EHR data to address comparative effectiveness and safety questions. I develop scalable and automated pipelines for curation and harmonization of EHR data across healthcare systems and coding systems.

Lucia Cevidanes

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We have developed and tested machine learning approaches to integrate quantitative markers for diagnosis and assessment of progression of TMJ OA, as well as extended the capabilities of 3D Slicer4 into web-based tools and disseminated open source image analysis tools. Our aims use data processing and in-depth analytics combined with learning using privileged information, integrated feature selection, and testing the performance of longitudinal risk predictors. Our long term goals are to improve diagnosis and risk prediction of TemporoMandibular Osteoarthritis in future multicenter studies.

The Spectrum of Data Science for Diagnosis of Osteoarthritis of the Temporomandibular Joint

Amy Pienta

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My research at ICPSR is developing ingest and curation workflows for new data types (including EEG) to ensure these data are Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable (FAIR) within data repositories.

My funded projects and programs:
National Addiction and HIV Data Archive Program (NAHDAP) funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Health and Medical Care Archive funded by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF)
Archive of Data on Disability to Enhance Policy and research (ADDEP) funded by NIH

Jing Sun

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My areas of interest are control, estimation, and optimization, with applications to energy systems in transportation, automotive, and marine domains. My group develops model-based and data-driven tools to explore underlying system dynamics and understand the operational environments. We develop computational frameworks and numerical algorithms to achieve real-time optimization and explore connectivity and data analytics to reduce uncertainties and improve performance through predictive control and planning.

Nicole Seiberlich

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My research involves developing novel data collection strategies and image reconstruction techniques for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. In order to accelerate data collection, we take advantage of features of MRI data, including sparsity, spatiotemporal correlations, and adherence to underlying physics; each of these properties can be leveraged to reduce the amount of data required to generate an image and thus speed up imaging time. We also seek to understand what image information is essential for radiologists in order to optimize MRI data collection and personalize the imaging protocol for each patient. We deploy machine learning algorithms and optimization techniques in each of these projects. In some of our work, we can generate the data that we need to train and test our algorithms using numerical simulations. In other portions, we seek to utilize clinical images, prospectively collected MRI data, or MRI protocol information in order to refine our techniques.

We seek to develop technologies like cardiac Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (cMRF), which can be used to efficiently collect multiple forms of information to distinguish healthy and diseased tissue using MRI. By using rapid methods like cMRF, quantitative data describing disease processes can be gathered quickly, enabling more and sicker patients can be assessed via MRI. These data, collected from many patients over time, can also be used to further refine MRI technologies for the assessment of specific diseases in a tailored, patient-specific manner.

Sol Bermann

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I am interested in the intersection of big data, data science, privacy, security, public policy, and law. At U-M, this includes co-convening the Dissonance Event Series, a multi-disciplinary collaboration of faculty and graduate students that explore the confluence of technology, policy, privacy, security, and law. I frequently guest lecture on these subject across campus, including at the School of Information, Ford School of Public Policy, and the Law School.

Niccolò Meneghetti

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Dr. Niccolò Meneghetti is an Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Science at the University of Michigan-Dearborn.
His major research interests are in the broad area of database systems, with primary focus on probabilistic databases, statistical relational learning and uncertain data management.