Marie O’Neill

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My research interests include health effects of air pollution, temperature extremes and climate change (mortality, asthma, hospital admissions, birth outcomes and cardiovascular endpoints); environmental exposure assessment; and socio-economic influences on health.
Data science tools and methodologies include geographic information systems and spatio-temporal analysis, epidemiologic study design and data management.

Ken Kollman

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I have been involved in the building of data infrastructure in the study of elections, political systems, violence, geospatial units, demographics, and topography. This infrastructure will eventually lead to the integration of data across many domains in the social, health, population, and behavioral sciences. My core research interests are in elections and political organizations.

Anne Fernandez

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Dr. Fernandez is a clinical psychologist with extensive training in both addiction and behavioral medicine. She is the Clinical Program Director at the University of Michigan Addiction Treatment Service. Her research focuses on the intersection of addiction and health across two main themes: 1) Expanding access to substance use disorder treatment and prevention services particularly in healthcare settings and; 2) applying precision health approaches to addiction-related healthcare questions. Her current grant-funded research includes an NIH-funded randomized controlled pilot trial of a preoperative alcohol intervention, an NIH-funded precision health study to leverage electronic health records to identify high-risk alcohol use at the time of surgery using natural language processing and other machine-learning based approaches, a University of Michigan funded precision health award to understand and prevent new persistent opioid use after surgery using prediction modeling, and a federally-funded evaluation of the state of Michigan’s substance use disorder treatment expansion.

Allyson Flaster

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I manage research activities for the College and Beyond II study at ICPSR, including survey development and data infrastructure planning. My research broadly focuses on issues of postsecondary access and success for undergraduate and graduate students and uses quantitative methodologies.

Sindhu Kutty

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My research centers on studying the interaction between abstract, theoretically sound probabilistic algorithms and human beings. One aspect of my research explores connections of Machine Learning to Crowdsourcing and Economics; focused in both cases on better understanding the aggregation process. As Machine Learning algorithms are used in making decisions that affect human lives, I am interested in evaluating the fairness of Machine Learning algorithms as well as exploring various paradigms of fairness. I study how these notions interact with more traditional performance metrics. My research in Computer Science Education focuses on developing and using evidence-based techniques in educating undergraduates in Machine Learning. To this end, I have developed a pilot summer program to introduce students to current Machine Learning research and enable them to make a more informed decision about what role they would like research to play in their future. I have also mentored (and continue to mentor) undergraduate students and work with students to produce publishable, and award-winning, undergraduate research.

Mithun Chakraborty

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My broad research interests are in multi-agent systems, computational economics and finance, and artificial intelligence. I apply techniques from algorithmic game theory, statistical machine learning, decision theory, etc. to a variety of problems at the intersection of the computational and social sciences. A major focus of my research has been the design and analysis of market-making algorithms for financial markets and, in particular, prediction markets — incentive-based mechanisms for aggregating data in the form of private beliefs about uncertain events (e.g. the outcome of an election) distributed among strategic agents. I use both analytical and simulation-based methods to investigate the impact of factors such as wealth, risk attitude, manipulative behavior, etc. on information aggregation in market ecosystems. Another line of work I am pursuing involves algorithms for allocating resources based on preference data collected from potential recipients, satisfying efficiency, fairness, and diversity criteria; my joint work on ethnicity quotas in Singapore public housing allocation deserves special mention in this vein. More recently, I have got involved in research on empirical game-theoretic analysis, a family of methods for building tractable models of complex, procedurally defined games from empirical/simulated payoff data and using them to reason about game outcomes.

Ranjan Pal

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Cyber-security is a complex and multi-dimensional research field. My research style comprises an inter-disciplinary (primarily rooted in economics, econometrics, data science (AI/ML/Bayesian and Frequentist Statistics), game theory, and network science) investigation of major socially pressing issues impacting the quality of cyber-risk management in modern networked and distributed engineering systems such as IoT-driven critical infrastructures, cloud-based service networks, and app-based systems (e.g., mobile commerce, smart homes) to name a few. I take delight in proposing data-driven, rigorous, and interdisciplinary solutions to both, existing fundamental challenges that pose a practical bottleneck to (cost) effective cyber-risk management, and futuristic cyber-security and privacy issues that might plague modern (networked) engineering systems. I strongly strive for originality, practical significance, and mathematical rigor in my solutions. One of my primary end goals is to conceptually get arms around complex, multi-dimensional information security and privacy problems in a way that helps, informs, and empowers practitioners and policy makers to take the right steps in making the cyber-space more secure.

Albert Shih

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My research is focused on the human biometric data (such as motion) to guide the design and manufacturing of assistive and proactive devices. Embedded and external sensors generate ample data which require scientific approaches to analyze and create knowledge. I have worked closely with the University of Michigan Orthotics and Prosthetics Center in the design and manufacturing of custom assistive devices using 3D-printing and cyber-based design. The goal is to create a cyber-physical system that can acquire the data from scanning, sensors, human motion, user feedback, clinician diagnosis into quantitative health metrics and guidelines to improve the quality of care for people with needs.

Carlos Aguilar

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The Aguilar group is focused understanding transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms of skeletal muscle stem cells in diverse contexts such as regeneration after injury and aging. We focus on this area because there are little to no therapies for skeletal muscle after injury or aging. We use various types of in-vivo and in-vitro models in combination with genomic assays and high-throughput sequencing to study these molecular mechanisms.

Xu Shi

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My methodological research focus on developing statistical methods for routinely collected healthcare databases such as electronic health records (EHR) and claims data. I aim to tackle the unique challenges that arise from the secondary use of real-world data for research purposes. Specifically, I develop novel causal inference methods and semiparametric efficiency theory that harness the full potential of EHR data to address comparative effectiveness and safety questions. I develop scalable and automated pipelines for curation and harmonization of EHR data across healthcare systems and coding systems.