Picture of Thomas Schwarz

Thomas A. Schwarz

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Professor Schwarz is an experimental particle physicist who has performed research in astro-particle physics, collider physics, as well as in accelerator physics and RF engineering. His current research focuses on discovering new physics in high-energy collisions with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. His particular focus is in precision measurements of properties of the Higgs Boson and searching for new associated physics using advanced AI and machine learning techniques.

Picture of David Brang

David Brang

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My lab studies how information from one sensory system influences processing in other sensory systems, as well as how this information is integrated in the brain. Specifically, we investigate the mechanisms underlying basic auditory, visual, and tactile interactions, synesthesia, multisensory body image perception, and visual facilitation of speech perception. Our current research examines multisensory processes using a variety of techniques including psychophysical testing and illusions, fMRI and DTI, electrophysiological measures of neural activity (both EEG and iEEG), and lesion mapping in patients with brain tumors. Our intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG/ECoG/sEEG) recordings are a unique resource that allow us to record neural activity directly from the human brain from clinically implanted electrodes in patients. These recordings are collected while patients perform the same auditory, visual, and tactile tasks that we use in our other behavioral and neuroimaging studies, but iEEG measures have millisecond temporal resolution as well as millimeter spatial precision, providing unparalleled information about the flow of neural activity in the brain. We use signal processing techniques and machine learning methods to identify how information is encoded in the brain and how it is disrupted in clinical contexts (e.g., in patients with a brain tumor).

Michael Craig

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Michael is an Assistant Professor of Energy Systems at the University of Michigan’s School for Environment and Sustainability and PI of the ASSET Lab. He researches how to equitably reduce global and local environmental impacts of energy systems while making those systems robust to future climate change. His research advances energy system models to address new challenges driven by decarbonization, climate adaptation, and equity objectives. He then applies these models to real-world systems to generate decision-relevant insights that account for engineering, economic, climatic, and policy features. His energy system models leverage optimization and simulation methods, depending on the problem at hand. Applying these models to climate mitigation or adaptation in real-world systems often runs into computational limits, which he overcomes through clustering, sampling, and other data reduction algorithms. His current interdisciplinary collaborations include climate scientists, hydrologists, economists, urban planners, epidemiologists, and diverse engineers.

Stefanus Jasin

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My research focus the application and development of new algorithms for solving complex business analytics problems. Applications vary from revenue management, dynamic pricing, marketing analytics, to retail logistics. In terms of methodology, I use a combination of operations research and machine learning/online optimization techniques.

 

Qing Qu

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His research interest lies in the intersection of signal processing, data science, machine learning, and numerical optimization. He is particularly interested in computational methods for learning low-complexity models from high-dimensional data, leveraging tools from machine learning, numerical optimization, and high dimensional geometry, with applications in imaging sciences, scientific discovery, and healthcare. Recently, he is also interested in understanding deep networks through the lens of low-dimensional modeling.

Lubomir Hadjiyski

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Dr. Hadjiyski research interests include computer-aided diagnosis, artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, predictive models, image processing and analysis, medical imaging, and control systems. His current research involves design of decision support systems for detection and diagnosis of cancer in different organs and quantitative analysis of integrated multimodality radiomics, histopathology and molecular biomarkers for treatment response monitoring using AI and machine learning techniques. He also studies the effect of the decision support systems on the physicians’ clinical performance.

Gen Li

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Dr. Gen Li is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biostatistics. He is devoted to developing new statistical methods for analyzing complex biomedical data, including multi-way tensor array data, multi-view data, and compositional data. His methodological research interests include dimension reduction, predictive modeling, association analysis, and functional data analysis. He also has research interests in scientific domains including microbiome and genomics.

Novel tree-guided regularization methods can identify important microbial features at different taxonomic ranks that are predictive of the clinical outcome.

Yasser Aboelkassem

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In this project, we use multi-scale models coupled with machine learning algorithms to study cardiac electromechanic coupling. The approach spans out the molecular, Brownian, and Langevin dynamics of the contractile (sarcomeric proteins) mechanism of cardiac cells and up-to-the finite element analysis of the tissue and organ levels. In this work, a novel surrogate machine learning algorithm for the sarcomere contraction is developed. The model is trained and established using in-silico data-driven dynamic sampling procedures implemented using our previously derived myofilament mathematical models.

Multi-scale Machine Learning Modeling of Cardiac Electromechanics Coupling

Multi-scale Machine Learning Modeling of Cardiac Electromechanics Coupling

Lu Wang

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Lu’s research is focused on natural language processing, computational social science, and machine learning. More specifically, Lu works on algorithms for text summarization, language generation, argument mining, information extraction, and discourse analysis, as well as novel applications that apply such techniques to understand media bias and polarization and other interdisciplinary subjects.