Hamid Ghanbari

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My research focuses on using digital health solutions, signal processing, machine learning and ecological momentary assessment to understand the physiological and psychological determinants of symptoms in patients with atrial fibrillation. I am building a research framework for rich data collection using smartphone apps, medical records and wearable sensors. I believe that creating a multidimensional dataset to study atrial fibrillation will yield important insights and serve as model for studying all chronic medical conditions.

Matias del Campo

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The goal of this project is the creation of a crucial building block of the research on AI and Architecture – a database of 3D models necessary to successfully run Artificial Neural Networks in 3D. This database is part of the first stepping-stones for the research at the AR2IL (Architecture and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory), an interdisciplinary Laboratory between Architecture (represented by Taubman College of Architecture of Urban Planning), Michigan Robotics, and the CS Department of the University of Michigan. A Laboratory dedicated to research specializing in the development of applications of Artificial Intelligence in the field of Architecture and Urban Planning. This area of inquiry has experienced an explosive growth in recent years (triggered in part by research conducted at UoM), as evidenced for example by the growth in papers dedicated to AI applications in architecture, as well as in the investment of the industry in this area. The research funded by this proposal would secure the leading position of Taubman College and the University of Michigan in the field of AI and Architecture. This proposal would also address the current lack of 3D databases that are specifically designed for Architecture applications.

The project “Generali Center’ presents itself as an experiment in the combination of Machine Learning processes capable of learning the salient features of a specific architecture style – in this case, Brutalism- in order to generatively perform interpolations between the data points of the provided dataset. These images serve as the basis of a pixel projection approach that results in a 3D model.

Stefanus Jasin

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My research focus the application and development of new algorithms for solving complex business analytics problems. Applications vary from revenue management, dynamic pricing, marketing analytics, to retail logistics. In terms of methodology, I use a combination of operations research and machine learning/online optimization techniques.

 

Cong Shi

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Cong Shi is an associate professor in the Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering at the University of Michigan College of Engineering. His primary research interest lies in developing efficient and provably-good data-driven algorithms for operations management models, including supply chain management, revenue management, service operations, and human-robot interactions. He received his Ph.D. in Operations Research at MIT in 2012, and his B.S. in Mathematics from the National University of Singapore in 2007.

Brendan Kochunas

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Dr. Kochunas’s research focus is on the next generation of numerical methods and parallel algorithms for high fidelity computational reactor physics and how to leverage these capabilities to develop digital twins. His group’s areas of expertise include neutron transport, nuclide transmutation, multi-physics, parallel programming, and HPC architectures. The Nuclear Reactor Analysis and Methods (NURAM) group is also developing techniques that integrate data-driven methods with conventional approaches in numerical analysis to produce “hybrid models” for accurate, real-time modeling applications. This is embodied by his recent efforts to combine high-fidelity simulation results simulation models in virtual reality through the Virtual Ford Nuclear Reactor.

Relationship of concepts for the Digital Model, Digital Shadow, Digital Twin, and the Physical Asset using images and models of the Ford Nuclear Reactor as an example. Large arrows represent automated information exchange and small arrows represent manual data exchange.

Gen Li

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Dr. Gen Li is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biostatistics. He is devoted to developing new statistical methods for analyzing complex biomedical data, including multi-way tensor array data, multi-view data, and compositional data. His methodological research interests include dimension reduction, predictive modeling, association analysis, and functional data analysis. He also has research interests in scientific domains including microbiome and genomics.

Novel tree-guided regularization methods can identify important microbial features at different taxonomic ranks that are predictive of the clinical outcome.

Wenbo Sun

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Uncertainty quantification and decision making are increasingly demanded with the development of future technology in engineering and transportation systems. Among the uncertainty quantification problems, Dr. Wenbo Sun is particularly interested in statistical modelling of engineering system responses with considering the high dimensionality and complicated correlation structure, as well as quantifying the uncertainty from a variety of sources simultaneously, such as the inexactness of large-scale computer experiments, process variations, and measurement noises. He is also interested in data-driven decision making that is robust to the uncertainty. Specifically, he delivers methodologies for anomaly detection and system design optimization, which can be applied to manufacturing process monitoring, distracted driving detection, out-of-distribution object identification, vehicle safety design optimization, etc.

J.J. Prescott

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Broadly, I study legal decision making, including decisions related to crime and employment. I typically use large social science data bases, but also collect my own data using technology or surveys.

Benjamin Fish

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My research tackles how human values can be incorporated into machine learning and other computational systems. This includes work on the translation process from human values to computational definitions and work on how to understand and encourage fairness while preventing discrimination in machine learning and data science. My research combines tools from the theory of machine learning with insights from economics, science and technology studies, and philosophy, among others, to improve our theories of the translation process and the algorithms we create. In settings like classification, social networks, and data markets, I explore the ways in which human values play a primary role in the quality of machine learning and data science.

The likelihood of receiving desirable information like public health information or job advertisements depends on both your position in a social network, and on who directly gets the information to start with (the seeds). This image shows how a new method for deciding who to select as the seeds, called maximin, outperforms the most popular approach in previous literature by decreasing the correlation between where you are in the social network and your likelihood of receiving the information. These figures are taken from work by Benjamin Fish, Ashkan Bashardoust, danah boyd, Sorelle A. Friedler, Carlos Scheidegger, and Suresh Venkatasubramanian. Gaps in information access in social networks. In The World Wide Web Conference, WWW 2019, San Francisco, CA, USA, May 13-17, 2019, pages 480–490, 2019.