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David Fouhey

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David works on computer vision and machine learning with the end goal of developing autonomous systems that can learn to build representations of the underlying state and dynamics of the world through observation (and potentially interaction).

Towards this end, he is particularly interested in understanding physical and functional properties from images. His research interest in physical properties aims to address how we can recover a rich 3D world from a 2D image. He is especially interested in representations — the answers that are obvious are also obviously defective — as well as how we should reconcile our strong prior knowledge about this structure of the problem with data-driven techniques. In recent work, he has become interested in applying this more broadly in the hope that we can develop AI systems that can learn how the physical world works from observation, including work on solar physics. In functional properties, he is interested in inferring and understanding opportunities for interaction with the environment by both robots and humans, both in terms of how one would learn this and what this implies for a physical understanding of the world.

Christopher E. Gillies

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I am Research Faculty with the Michigan Center for Integrative Research in Critical Care (MCIRCC). Our team builds predictive algorithms, analyzes signals, and implements statistical models to advance Critical Care Medicine. We use electronic healthcare record data to build predictive algorithms. One example of this is Predicting Intensive Care Transfers and other Unforeseen Events (PICTURE), which uses commonly collected vital signs and labs to predict patient deterioration on the general hospital floor. Additionally, our team collects waveforms from the University Hospital, and we store this data utilizing Amazon Web Services. We use these signals to build predictive algorithms to advance precision medicine. Our flagship algorithm called Analytic for Hemodynamic Instability (AHI), predicts patient deterioration using a single-lead electrocardiogram signal. We use Bayesian methods to analyze metabolomic biomarker data from blood and exhaled breath to understand Sepsis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. I also have an interest in statistical genetics.

Jeffrey Regier

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Jeffrey Regier received a PhD in statistics from UC Berkeley (2016) and joined the University of Michigan as an assistant professor. His research interests include graphical models, Bayesian inference, high-performance computing, deep learning, astronomy, and genomics.

Mark P Van Oyen

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Efficient, low regret contextual multi-armed bandit approaches for real time learning including Thompson sampling, UCB, and knowledge gradient descent. Integration of optimization and predictive analytics for determining the time to next measurement, which modality to use, and the optimal control of risk factors to manage chronic disease. Integration of soft voting ensemble classifiers and multiple models Kalman filters for disease state prediction, Real-time (online) contextual multi-armed bandits integrated with optimization of hospital bed type dynamic control decisions for reducing 30-day readmission rates in hospitals. Robustness in system optimization when the system model is uncertain with emphasis on quantile regression forests, sample average approximation, robust optimization and distributionally robust optimization. Health care delivery systems models with prediction and control for inpatient and outpatient. Work has been done on Emergency Department redesign for improved patient flow; Capacity management and planning and scheduling for outpatient care, including integrated services networks; admission control with machine learning to ICUs, stepdown, and regular care units Surgical planning and scheduling for access delay control; Planning and scheduling for Clinical Research Units.

Machine learning, system modeling, and stochastic control can be used to slow the rate of glaucoma progression based on treatment aggressiveness options selected jointly with the patient.

Aaron A. King

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The long temporal and large spatial scales of ecological systems make controlled experimentation difficult and the amassing of informative data challenging and expensive. The resulting sparsity and noise are major impediments to scientific progress in ecology, which therefore depends on efficient use of data. In this context, it has in recent years been recognized that the onetime playthings of theoretical ecologists, mathematical models of ecological processes, are no longer exclusively the stuff of thought experiments, but have great utility in the context of causal inference. Specifically, because they embody scientific questions about ecological processes in sharpest form—making precise, quantitative, testable predictions—the rigorous confrontation of process-based models with data accelerates the development of ecological understanding. This is the central premise of my research program and the common thread of the work that goes on in my laboratory.

Jason Goldstick

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I am a statistician and my research focuses on applied public health work in a variety of fields specific to injury prevention, including substance use, violence, motor vehicle crash, and traumatic brain injury. Within those applications, I apply analytic methods for longitudinal data analysis, spatial and spatio-temporal data analysis, and predictive modeling (e.g., for clinical prediction of future injury risk applied to injuries like stroke, Benzodiazepine overdose, and firearm injury). I am also MPI of the System for Opioid Overdose Surveillance–a near-real-time system for monitoring fatal and nonfatal overdoses in Michigan; the system generates automated spatial and temporal summaries of recent overdose trends.

Gongjun Xu

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Dr. Gongjun Xu is an assistant professor in the Department of Statistics at the University of Michigan. Dr. Xu’s research interests include latent variable models, psychometrics, cognitive diagnosis modeling, high-dimensional statistics, and semiparametric statistics.