Karandeep Singh

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I direct the Machine Learning for Learning Health Systems lab, whose work focuses on developing, validating, and evaluating the effectiveness of machine learning models within health systems. This includes projects such as a machine learning-supported patient educational platform (https://ask.musicurology.com) to support decision-making for patients with urological conditions. In additional to my predictive modeling research, I study patient-facing mobile apps and have published on this topic in Health Affairs, the Journal of General Internal Medicine, and the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, among others. I have additional leadership roles that recognize my expertise in machine learning at a local and regional level. I chair the Michigan Medicine Clinical Intelligence Committee, which oversees implementation of predictive models across our health system, and I serve on the Michigan Economic Development Corporation’s Artificial Intelligence Advisory Board, where I contribute to the state of Michigan’s vision on artificial intelligence. I also teach a health data science and machine learning course to over 60 graduate students per year.

Andrew Krumm

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My research examines the ways in which individuals and organizations use data to improve. Quality improvement and data-intensive research approaches are central to my work along with forming equitable collaborations between researchers and frontline workers. Prior to joining the Department of Learning Health Sciences, I was the Director of Learning Analytics Research at Digital Promise and a Senior Education Researcher in the Center for Technology in Learning at SRI International. At both organizations, I developed data-intensive research-practice partnerships with educational organizations of all types. As a learning scientist working at the intersection of data-intensive research and quality improvement, my colleagues and I have developed tools and strategies (e.g., cloud-based, open source tools for engaging in collaborative exploratory data analyses) that partnerships between researchers and practitioners can use to measure learning and improve learning environments.

This is an image that my colleagues and I, over multiple projects, developed to communicate the multiple steps involved in collaborative data-intensive improvement. The “organize” and “understand” phases are about asking the right questions before the work of data analysis begins: “co-develop” and “test” are about taking action following an analysis. Along with identifying common phases, we have also observed the importance of the following supporting conditions: a trusting partnership, the use of formal improvement methods, common data workflows, and intentional efforts to support the learning of everyone involved in the project.

V. G. Vinod Vydiswaran

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V.G.Vinod Vydiswaran, PhD, is Assistant Professor in the Department of Learning Health Sciences with a secondary appointment in the School of Information at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Dr. Vydiswaran’s research focuses on developing and applying text mining, natural language processing, and machine learning methodologies for extracting relevant information from health-related text corpora. This includes medically relevant information from clinical notes and biomedical literature, and studying the information quality and credibility of online health communication (via health forums and tweets). His previous work includes developing novel information retrieval models to assist clinical decision making, modeling information trustworthiness, and addressing the vocabulary gap between health professionals and ¬†laypersons.

Timothy Pletcher

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My current research focus is on modeling and simulating the value and benefits of various data sharing and policy trade offs. Typically these utilize system dynamics methodologies and tools.

I also have considerable experience across multiple industries with developing processes to enable industry and faculty to identify and solve data science problems using SAS tools.