Brady West

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My current research interests include the implications of measurement error in auxiliary variables and survey paradata for survey estimation, survey nonresponse, interviewer variance, and multilevel regression models for clustered and longitudinal data. I also conduct research in statistical software.

Pamela Davis-Kean

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Pamela Davis-Kean, PhD, is Professor of Psychology, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and Research Professor, Survey Research Center and Research Center for Group Dynamics, Institute for Social Research, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Davis-Kean is the Director of the Population, Neurodevelopment, and Genetics program at the Institute for Social Research. This group examines the complex transactions of brain, biology, and behavior as children and families develop across time. She is interested in both micro (brain and biology) and macro (family and socioeconomic conditions) aspects of development to understand the full developmental story of individuals.  Her primary focus in this area is how stress relates to family socioeconomic status and how that translates to parenting beliefs and behaviors that influence the development of children.

Roderick Little

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Roderick Joseph Little, PhD, is the Richard D. Remington Distinguished University Professor of Biostatistics, Professor of Statistics, Research Professor, Institute for Social Research, and Senior Fellow, Michigan Society of Fellows, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Little’s primary research interest is the analysis of data sets with missing values. Many statistical techniques are designed for complete, rectangular data sets, but in practice biostatistical data sets contain missing values, either by design or accident. As detailed in my book with Rubin, initial statistical approaches were relatively ad-hoc, such as discarding incomplete cases or substituting means, but modern methods are increasingly based on models for the data and missing-data mechanism, using likelihood-based inferential techniques.

Another interest is the analysis of data collected by complex sampling designs involving stratification and clustering of units. Since working as a statistician for the World Fertility Survey, I have been interested in the development of model-based methods for survey analysis that are robust to misspecification, reasonably efficient, and capable of implementation in applied settings. Statistics is philosophically fascinating and diverse in application. My inferential philosophy is model-based and Bayesian, although the effects of model misspecification need careful attention. My applied interests are broad, including mental health, demography, environmental statistics, biology, economics and the social sciences as well as biostatistics.

Margaret Hedstrom

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Margaret Hedstrom, PhD, is the Robert M Warner Collegiate Professor of Information in the School of Information and Faculty Associate in the Institute for Social Research.

Prof. Hedstrom’s research centers on the methods, costs, incentives, and implementation of scalable digital curation and archiving services as a core element of the underlying infrastructure for research data management, reproducible research, and data analysis.  She studies the social and technical dimensions digital curation including data sharing behaviors among scientists in different research domains, techniques for automated metadata extraction and user-contributed metadata, requirements for meaningful reuse of numeric, image, and textual data, and long-term preservation of digital information.  Her current research projects span projects involving researchers in environmental science and sustainability, social science, bioinformatics, and materials science.