Yuehao Bai

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My research interests lie in design and analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), partial identification, identification and inference with multi-valued treatments and instruments, and quantile regression. In one recent paper I study the optimal stratified randomization procedure in RCTs, and found a certain kind of matched-pair design is optimal. In another paper (coauthored with Joe Romano and Azeem Shaikh), we provide asymptotically exact inference procedure for matched-pair designs. In another paper we study inference with moment inequalities whose dimension grows exponentially fast with the sample size. I also have a paper in which we study the sharp identified sets for various treatment effects with multi-valued instruments and multi-values treatments.

James R. Hines Jr.

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Professor Hines’ research focuses on the analysis of the donative behavior of Americans, and how it affects the intergenerational and interpersonal transmission of economic well-being. To what extent do parents leave property to their children and others, and how is this behavior affected by legal institutions, taxes, social norms, and other considerations? While there are no comprehensive sources of data on wills, trusts, lifetime gifts, and other forms of property transmission, there is ample available information from legal documents that with the help of natural language processing can hopefully be coded and analyzed in a systematic way.

Brian P. McCall

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My interests are in the areas of labor economics, program evaluation, and the economics of education. Currently my research focuses on college student debt accumulation and the subsequent risk of default, the effect of tuition subsidies on college attendance, the influence of family wealth on college attendance and completion, the effect of financial aid packages on college attendance, completion and subsequent labor market earnings, the influence of education on job displacement and subsequent earnings, the impact of unemployment insurance rules on unemployment durations and re-employment wages, and the determinants and consequences of repeat use of the unemployment insurance system.

Matthew Shapiro

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Prof. Shapiro is the Lawrence R. Klein Collegiate Professor of Economics, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts and Research Professor, Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Shapiro’s general area of research is macroeconomics. He has studied investment and capital utilization, business-cycle fluctuations, consumption and saving, financial markets, monetary policy, fiscal policy, and time-series econometrics. Among his current research interests are consumption, saving, retirement, and portfolio choices of households, the effects of tax policy on investment, using surveys in macroeconomics, and improving the quality of national economic statistics.