Douglas Zytko

Douglas Zytko

By |

My research explores consent in various facets of social computing and human-computer interaction. Most germane to MIDAS would be research into consent to personal data donation for AI model training, and more broadly approaches for participatory AI that directly involve AI-novice stakeholders in design and development of new AI-driven technologies.

Cam McLeman

Cam McLeman

By |

My research interests lie in the application of mathematical tools to machine learning models, e.g., using tools from graph theory and stochastic processes to study graphical neural networks, and conversely, the application of artificial intelligence to mathematical proofs, e.g., automated theorem-proving and theorem-generation. With IDEAS, I also work to use more standard applications of machine learning models to solve problems for groups who traditionally lack access to data science expertise.

My doctoral training was in algebraic number theory, and one of the boasts of number theory is that you are required to use tools from every discipline in mathematics to understand all of its facets. This brought me in contact with graph theory both in the abstract and in the applied setting of Markov chains and stochastic processes, and using these ideas to model evolutions of systems in natural settings. Most recently, the dynamic updating of stochastic processes on graphs is very similar in spirit to the training of many models of neural networks, and exploring the symbiosis between these two sets of ideas has been a driver of my recent research.

In IDEAS, we are excited about taking the reams of student and faculty expertise and research at the University of Michigan and using it “for the people” — finding ways of furthering the goals of small businesses or local community groups that do not have the resources to have a data scientist on staff. On the research front, I personally am very excited to see how the study of mathematics evolves as generative AI models meet formal theorem-proving systems.

Cam McLeman

Cam McLeman

By |

My research interests lie in the application of mathematical tools to machine learning models, e.g., using tools from graph theory and stochastic processes to study graphical neural networks, and conversely, the application of artificial intelligence to mathematical proofs, e.g., automated theorem-proving and theorem-generation. With IDEAS, I also work to use more standard applications of machine learning models to solve problems for groups who traditionally lack access to data science expertise.

My doctoral training was in algebraic number theory, and one of the boasts of number theory is that you are required to use tools from every discipline in mathematics to understand all of its facets. This brought me in contact with graph theory both in the abstract and in the applied setting of Markov chains and stochastic processes, and using these ideas to model evolutions of systems in natural settings. Most recently, the dynamic updating of stochastic processes on graphs is very similar in spirit to the training of many models of neural networks, and exploring the symbiosis between these two sets of ideas has been a driver of my recent research.

Yasser Aboelkassem

By |

In this project, we use multi-scale models coupled with machine learning algorithms to study cardiac electromechanic coupling. The approach spans out the molecular, Brownian, and Langevin dynamics of the contractile (sarcomeric proteins) mechanism of cardiac cells and up-to-the finite element analysis of the tissue and organ levels. In this work, a novel surrogate machine learning algorithm for the sarcomere contraction is developed. The model is trained and established using in-silico data-driven dynamic sampling procedures implemented using our previously derived myofilament mathematical models.

Multi-scale Machine Learning Modeling of Cardiac Electromechanics Coupling

Multi-scale Machine Learning Modeling of Cardiac Electromechanics Coupling

Halil Bisgin

By |

My research is focused on a wide range of topics from computational social sciences to bioinformatics where I do pattern recognition, perform data analysis, and build prediction models. At the core of my effort, there lie machine learning methods by which I have been trying to address problems related to social networks, opinion mining, biomarker discovery, pharmacovigilance, drug repositioning, security analytics, genomics, food contamination, and concussion recovery. I’m particularly interested in and eager to collaborate on cyber security aspect of social media analytics that includes but not limited to misinformation, bots, and fake news. In addition, I’m still pursuing opportunities in bioinformatics, especially about next generation sequencing analysis that can be also leveraged for phenotype predictions by using machine learning methods.

A typical pipeline for developing and evaluating a prediction models to identify malicious Android mobile apps in the market

Amal Alhosban

By |

Amal Alhosban, is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at the University of Michigan Flint campus. She received her Ph.D. in Computer Science at Wayne State University in 2013. Her research focuses on Semantic Web and Fault Management and Wireless Network.

Murali Mani

By |

Murali Mani, PhD, is Professor of Computer Science at the University of Michigan, Flint.

The significant research problems Prof. Mani is investigating include the following: big data management, big data analytics and visualization, provenance, query processing of encrypted data, event stream processing, XML stream processing. data modeling using XML schemas, and effective computer science education. In addition, he has worked in industry on clickstream analytics (2015), and on web search engines (1999-2000). Prof. Mani’s significant publications are listed on DBLP at: http://dblp.uni-trier.de/pers/hd/m/Mani:Murali.

9.9.2020 MIDAS Faculty Research Pitch Video.

MIDAS Faculty Research Pitch, Fall 2021

Illustrating how our SMART system effectively integrates big data processing and data visualization to enable big data visualization. The left side shows a typical data visualization scenario, where the different analysts are using their different visualization systems. These visualization systems can provide interactive visualizations but cannot handle the complexities of big data. They interact with a distributed data processing system that can handle the complexities of big data. The SMART system improves the user experience by carefully sending additional data to the visualization system in response to a request from an analyst so that future visualization requests can be answered directly by the visualization system without accessing the data processing system.

Illustrating how our SMART system effectively integrates big data processing and data visualization to enable big data visualization. The left side shows a typical data visualization scenario, where the different analysts are using their different visualization systems. These visualization systems can provide interactive visualizations but cannot handle the complexities of big data. They interact with a distributed data processing system that can handle the complexities of big data. The SMART system improves the user experience by carefully sending additional data to the visualization system in response to a request from an analyst so that future visualization requests can be answered directly by the visualization system without accessing the data processing system.

 

Mark Allison

By |

Mark Allison, PhD, is Associate Professor of Computer Science in the department of Computer Science, Engineering and Physics at the University of Michigan-Flint.

Dr. Allison’s┬áresearch pertains to the autonomic control of complex cyberphysical systems utilizing software models as first class artifacts. Domains being explored are microgrid energy management and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in swarms.

 

Amy M. Yorke

By |

Amy M. Yorke, PT, PhD, NCS, is Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy at the University of Michigan, Flint.

 

Rie Suzuki

By |

Dr. Suzuki is a behavioral scientist and has major research interests in examining and intervening mediational social determinants factors of health behaviors and health outcomes across lifespan. She analyzes the National Health Interview Survey, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey as well as the Flint regional medical records to understand the factors associating with poor health outcomes among people with disabilities including children and aging.