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MDST group wins KDD best paper award

By | General Interest, Happenings, MDSTPosts, Research

A paper by members and faculty leaders of the Michigan Data Science Team (co-authors: Jacob Abernethy, Alex Chojnacki, Arya Farahi, Eric Schwartz, and Jared Webb) won the Best Student Paper award in the Applied Data Science track at the KDD 2018 conference in August in London.

The paper, ActiveRemediation: The Search for Lead Pipes in Flint, Michigan, details the group’s ongoing work in Flint to detect pipes made of lead and other hazardous material.

For more on the team’s work, see this recent U-M press release.

U-M part of new software institute on high-energy physics

By | General Interest, Happenings, News, Research

The University of Michigan is part of an NSF-supported 17-university coalition dedicated to creating next-generation computing power to support high-energy physics research.

Led by Princeton University, the Institute for Research and Innovation in Software for High Energy Physics (IRIS-HEP) will focus on developing software and expertise to enable a new era of discovery at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland.

Shawn McKee, Research Scientist in the U-M Department of Physics, is a co-PI of the institute. His His work will focus on integrating and extending the Open Storage Grid networking activities with similar efforts at the LHC.

For more information, see Princeton’s press release, and the NSF’s announcement.

New course for fall 2018: On-Ramp to Data Science for Chemical Engineers

By | Educational, General Interest, Happenings, News

Description: Engineers are encountering and generating a ever-growing body of data and recognizing the utility of applying data science (DataSci) approaches to extract knowledge from that data. A common barrier to learning DataSci is the stack of prerequisite courses that cannot fit into the typical engineering student schedule. This class will remove this barrier by, in one semester, covering essential foundational concepts that are not part of many engineering disciplines’ core curricula. These include: good programming practices, data structures, linear algebra, numerical methods, algorithms, probability, and statistics. The class’s focus will be on how these topics relate to data science and to provide context for further self-study.

Eligibility: College of Engineering students, pending instructor approval.

More information: http://myumi.ch/LzqPq

Instructor: Heather Mayes, Assistant Professor, Chemical Engineering, hbmayes@umich.edu.

University of Michigan awarded Women in High Performance Computing chapter

By | General Interest, News

The University of Michigan has been recognized as one of the first Chapters in the new Women in High Performance Computing (WHPC) Pilot Program.

“The WHPC Chapter Pilot will enable us to reach an ever-increasing community of women, provide these women with the networks that we recognize are essential for them excelling in their career, and retaining them in the workforce.” says Dr. Sharon Broude Geva, WHPC’s Director of Chapters and Director of Advanced Research Computing (ARC) at the University of Michigan (U-M). “At the same time, we envisage that the new Chapters will be able to tailor their activities to the needs of their local community, as we know that there is no ‘one size fits all’ solution to diversity.”

“At WHPC we are delighted to be accepting the University of Michigan as a Chapter under the pilot program, and working with them to build a sustainable solution to diversifying the international HPC landscape” said Dr. Toni Collis, Chair and co-founder of WHPC, and Chief Business Development Officer at Appentra Solutions.

The process of selecting organizations to participate in the program accounted for potential conflicts of interest; Geva did not vote on U-M’s application.

About Women in High Performance Computing (WHPC) and the Chapters and Affiliates Pilot Program

Women in High Performance Computing (WHPC) was created with the vision to encourage women to participate in the HPC community by providing fellowship, education, and support to women and the organizations that employ them. Through collaboration and networking, WHPC strives to bring together women in HPC and technical computing while encouraging women to engage in outreach activities and improve the visibility of inspirational role models.

WHPC has launched a pilot program for groups to become Affiliates or Chapters. The program will share the knowledge and expertise of WHPC as well as help to tailor activities and develop diversity and inclusion goals suitable to the needs of local HPC communities. During the pilot, WHPC will work with the Chapters and Affiliates to support and promote the work of women in their organizations, develop crucial role models, and assist employers in the recruitment and retention of a diverse and inclusive HPC workforce.

WHPC is stewarded by EPCC at the University of Edinburgh. For more information visit http://www.womeninhpc.org.  

For more information on the U-M chapter, contact Dr. Geva at sgeva@umich.edu.

MIDAS researchers’ papers accepted at ACM KDD data science conference in London

By | General Interest, Happenings, News, Research

Several U-M faculty affiliated with MIDAS will participate in the KDD2018 Conference in London in August. The meeting is held by the Associate for Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group in Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (KDD).

U-M researchers had the following papers accepted:

Learning Adversarial Networks for Semi-Supervised Text Classification via Policy Gradient
Yan Li (U-M); Jieping Ye (U-M)

TINET: Learning Invariant Networks via Knowledge Transfer
Chen Luo (Rice University); Zhengzhang Chen (NEC Laboratories America); Lu-An Tang (NEC Laboratories America); Anshumali Shrivastava (Rice University); Zhichun Li (NEC Laboratories America); Haifeng Chen (NEC Laboratories America); Jieping Ye (U-M)

Modeling Task Relationships in Multi-task Learning with Multi-gate Mixture-of-Experts
Jiaqi Ma(U-M); Zhe Zhao (Google); Xinyang Yi (Google); Jilin Chen (Google); Lichan Hong (Google); Ed Chi (Google)

Learning Credible Models
Jiaxuan Wang (U-M); Jeeheh Oh (U-M); Haozhu Wang (U-M); Jenna Wiens (U-M)

Deep Multi-Output Forecasting: Learning to Accurately Predict Blood Glucose Trajectories
Ian Fox (U-M); Lynn Ang (U-M); Mamta Jaiswal (U-M); Rodica Pop-Busui (U-M); Jenna Wiens (U-M)

ActiveRemediation: The Search for Lead Pipes in Flint, Michigan
Jacob Abernethy (Georgia Institute of Technology); Alex Chojnacki (U-M); Arya Farahi (U-M); Eric Schwartz (U-M); Jared Webb (Brigham Young University)

Career Transitions and Trajectories: A Case Study in Computing
Tara Safavi (U-M); Maryam Davoodi (Purdue University); Danai Koutra (U-M)

In addition, U-M Professor Jieping Ye will present at the event’s Artificial Intelligence in Transportation tutorial, and U-M Assistant Professor Qiaozhu Mei will speak as part of Deep Learning Day.

Dinov article: Building consensus on data science education and training

By | Research

Dr. Ivo Dinov, professor of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, Human Behavior, and Biological Science, and associate director of MIDAS, recently published an article on the training and education curricula needs of data science.

Title: Quant data science meets dexterous artistry
Published in: International Journal of Data Science and Analytics
DOI: 10.1007/s41060-018-0138-6
Author: Ivo D Dinov
Abstract: Data science is a bridge discipline connecting fundamental science, applied disciplines, and the arts. The demand for novel data science methods is well established. However, there is much less agreement on the core aspects of representation, modeling, and analytics that involve huge and heterogeneous datasets. The scientific community needs to build consensus about data science education and training curricula, including the necessary entry matriculation prerequisites and the expected learning competency outcomes needed to tackle complex Big Data challenges. To meet the rapidly increasing demand for effective evidence-based practice and data analytic methods, research teams, funding agencies, academic institutions, politicians, and industry leaders should embrace innovation, promote high-risk projects, join forces to expand the technological capacity, and enhance the workforce skills.