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Victoria Morckel

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Dr. Morckel uses spatial and statistical methods to examine ways to improve quality of life for people living in shrinking, deindustrialized cities in the Midwestern United States. She is especially interested in the causes and consequences of population loss, including issues of vacancy, blight, and neighborhood change.

Suitability Analysis Results: Map of Potential Properties to Naturalize in the City of Flint, Michigan.

Raed Al Kontar

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My research broadly focuses on developing data analytics and decision-making methodologies specifically tailored for Internet of Things (IoT) enabled smart and connected products/systems. I envision that most (if not all) engineering systems will eventually become connected systems in the future. Therefore, my key focus is on developing next-generation data analytics, machine learning, individualized informatics and graphical and network modeling tools to truly realize the competitive advantages that are promised by smart and connected products/systems.

 

Greg Rybarczyk

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Using GIS, visual analytics, and spatiotemporal modeling, Dr. Rybarczyk examines the utility of Big Data for gaining insight into the causal mechanisms that influence travel patterns and urban dynamics. In particular, his research sets out to provide a fuller understanding of “what” and “where” micro-scale conditions affect human sentiment and hence wayfinding ability, movement patterns, and travel mode-choices.

Recent works:

Rybarczyk, G. and S. Banerjee. (2015) Visualizing active travel sentiment in an urban context, Journal of Transport and Health, 2(2): 30

Rybarczyk, G., S. Banerjee, and M. Starking-Szymanski, and R. Shaker. (2018) “Travel and us: The impact of mode share on sentiment using geosocial media data and GIS” Journal of Location-Based Services (forthcoming)

Jerome P. Lynch

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Jerome P. Lynch, PhD, is Professor and Donald Malloure Department Chair of the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department in the College of Engineering in the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Lynch’s group works at the forefront of deploying large-scale sensor networks to the built environment for monitoring and control of civil infrastructure systems including bridges, roads, rail networks, and pipelines; this research portfolio falls within the broader class of cyber-physical systems (CPS). To maximize the benefit of the massive data sets, they collect from operational infrastructure systems, and undertake research in the area of relational and NoSQL database systems, cloud-based analytics, and data visualization technologies. In addition, their algorithmic work is focused on the use of statistical signal processing, pattern classification, machine learning, and model inversion/updating techniques to automate the interrogation sensor data collected. The ultimate aim of Prof. Lynch’s work is to harness the full potential of data science to provide system users with real-time, actionable information obtained from the raw sensor data collected.

A permanent wireless monitoring system was installed in 2011 on the New Carquinez Suspension Bridge (Vallejo, CA). The system continuously collects data pertaining to the bridge environment and the behavior of the bridge to load; our data science research is instrumental in unlocking the value of structural monitoring data through data-driven interrogation.

A permanent wireless monitoring system was installed in 2011 on the New Carquinez Suspension Bridge (Vallejo, CA). The system continuously collects data pertaining to the bridge environment and the behavior of the bridge to load; our data science research is instrumental in unlocking the value of structural monitoring data through data-driven interrogation.