Gabor Orosz

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Gabor Orosz is an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Civil and Environmental Engineering. His theoretical research include dynamical systems, control, and reinforcement learning with particular interests in the roles of nonlinearities and time delays in such systems. In terms of applications he focuses on connected and automated vehicles, traffic flow, and biological networks. His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation and industrial funds. His recent work appeared in journals like IEEE Transactions on Automated Control, IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology, IEEE Transactions on Intelligent Transportation Systems, and Transportation Research Part C. For the latter journal he has also be serving as an Editor. WIRED magazine reported on his experimental results when his team built a connected automated vehicle and evaluated it in real traffic. He served as the program chair for the 12th IFAC Workshop on Time Delay Systems and served as the general chair for 3rd IAVSD Workshop on Dynamics of Road Vehicles, Connected and Automated Vehicles.

Feng Zhou

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For human-machine systems, I first collect data from human users, whether it’s an individual, a team, or even a society. Different kinds of methods can be used, including self-report, interview, focus groups, physiological and behavioral data, as well as user-generated data from the Internet.

Based on the data collected, I attempt to understand human contexts, including different aspects of the human users, such as emotion, cognition, needs, preferences, locations and activities. Such understanding can then be applied to different human-machine systems, including healthcare systems, automated driving systems, and product-service systems.

Based on the different design theory and methodology, from the perspective of the machine dimension, I apply knowledge of computing and communication as well as practical and theoretical knowledge of social and behavior to design various systems for human users. From the human dimension, I seek to understand human needs and decision making processes, and then build mathematical models and design tools that facilitate integration of subjective experiences, social contexts, and engineering principles into the design process of human-machine systems.

Ya’acov Ritov

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My main interest is theoretical statistics as implied to complex model from semiparametric to ultra high dimensional regression analysis. In particular the negative aspects of Bayesian and causal analysis as implemented in modern statistics.

An analysis of the position of SCOTUS judges.

Robert Hampshire

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He develops and applies operations research, data science, and systems approaches to public and private service industries. His research focuses on the management and policy analysis of emerging networked industries and innovative mobility services such as smart parking, connected vehicles, autonomous vehicles, ride-hailing, bike sharing, and car sharing. He has worked extensively with both public and private sector partners worldwide. He is a queueing theorist that uses statistics, stochastic modeling, simulation and dynamic optimization.

Aditi Misra

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Transportation is the backbone of the urban mobility system and is one of the greatest sources of environmental emissions and pollutions. Making urban transportation efficient, equitable and sustainable is the main focus of my research. My students and I analyze small scale survey data as well as large scale spatiotemporal data to identify travel behavior trends and patterns at a disaggregate level using econometric methods, which we then scale up to the population level through predictive and statistical modeling. We also design our own data collection methods and instruments, be it a network of smart devices or stated preference experiments. Our expertise lies in identifying latent constructs that influence decisions and choices, which in turn dictate demands on the systems and subsystems. We use our expertise to design incentives and policy suggestions that can help promote sustainable and equitable multimodal transportation systems. Our team also uses data analytics, particularly classification and pattern recognition algorithms, to analyze crash context data and develop safety-critical scenarios for automated and connected vehicle (CAV) deployment. We have developed an online game based on such scenarios to promote safe shared mobility among teenagers and young adults and plan to expand research in that area. We are also currently expanding our research to explore the use of NN in context information synthesis.

This is a project where we used classification and Bayesian models to identify scenarios that are risky for pedestrians and bicyclists. We then developed an online game based on those scenarios for middle schoolers so that they are better prepared for shared road conflicts.

Jing Sun

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My areas of interest are control, estimation, and optimization, with applications to energy systems in transportation, automotive, and marine domains. My group develops model-based and data-driven tools to explore underlying system dynamics and understand the operational environments. We develop computational frameworks and numerical algorithms to achieve real-time optimization and explore connectivity and data analytics to reduce uncertainties and improve performance through predictive control and planning.

Fred Feng

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Dr. Feng’s research involves conducting and using naturalistic observational studies to better understand the interactions between motorists and other road users including bicyclists and pedestrians. The goal is to use an evidence-based, data-driven approach that improves bicycling and walking safety and ultimately makes them viable mobility options. A naturalistic study is a valuable and unique research method that provides continuous, high-time-resolution, rich, and objective data about how people drive/ride/walk for their everyday trips in the real world. It also faces challenges from the sheer volume of the data, and as with all observational studies, there are potential confounding factors compared to a randomized laboratory experiment. Data analytic methods can be developed to interpret the behavioral data, make meaningful inferences, and get actionable insights.

9.9.2020 MIDAS Faculty Research Pitch Video.

Using naturalistic driving data to examine the interactions between motorists and bicyclists

Neda Masoud

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The future of transportation lies at the intersection of two emerging trends, namely, the sharing economy and connected and automated vehicle technology. Our research group investigates the impact of these two major trends on the future of mobility, quantifying the benefits and identifying the challenges of integrating these technologies into our current systems.

Our research on shared-use mobility systems focuses on peer-to-peer (P2P) ridesharing and multi-modal transportation. We provide: (i) operational tools and decision support systems for shared-use mobility in legacy as well as connected and automated transportation systems. This line of research focuses on system design as well as routing, scheduling, and pricing mechanisms to serve on-demand transportation requests; (ii) insights for regulators and policy makers on mobility benefits of multi-modal transportation; (ii) planning tools that would allow for informed regulations of sharing economy.

In another line of research we investigate challenges faced by the connected automated vehicle technology before mass adoption of this technology can occur. Our research mainly focuses on (i) transition of control authority between the human driver and the autonomous entity in semi-autonomous (level 3 SAE autonomy) vehicles; (ii) incorporating network-level information supplied by connected vehicle technology into traditional trajectory planning; (iii) improving vehicle localization by taking advantage of opportunities provided by connected vehicles; and (iv) cybersecurity challenges in connected and automated systems. We seek to quantify the mobility and safety implications of this disruptive technology, and provide insights that can allow for informed regulations.