Nancy Fleischer

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Dr. Fleischer’s research focuses on how the broader socioeconomic and policy environments impact health disparities and the health of vulnerable populations, in the U.S. and around the world. Through this research, her group employs various analytic techniques to examine data at multiple levels (country-level, state-level, and neighborhood-level), emphasizing the role of structural influences on individual health. Her group applies advanced epidemiologic, statistical, and econometric methods to this research, including survey methodology, longitudinal data analysis, hierarchical modeling, causal inference, systems science, and difference-in-difference analysis. Dr. Fleischer leads two NCI-funded projects focused on the impact of tobacco control policies on health equity in the U.S.

Joshua P Newell

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I work in the area of urban sustainability, with research questions at multiple scales and environmental and socio-economic systems. My work uses spatial analysis (esp. GIS and remote sensing) and mass-balance accounting (life cycle assessment, material flow analysis). My lab is starting to use big data from a range of sources (Zillow, Twitter, etc) and I am interested in collaborating with data sciences of various stripes on sustainability and equity challenges.

Gary L. Freed

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I conduct a broad range of research on health policy and health economics focused on children. I will be launching a program on child health equity in the fall of 2020.

Sunghee Lee

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My research focuses on issues in data collection with hard-to-reach populations. In particular, she examines 1) nontraditional sampling approaches for minority or stigmatized populations and their statistical properties and 2) measurement error and comparability issues for racial, ethnic and linguistic minorities, which also have implications for cross-cultural research/survey methodology. Most recently, my research has been dedicated to respondent driven sampling that uses existing social networks to recruit participants in both face-to-face and Web data collection settings. I plan to expand my research scope in examining representation issues focusing on the racial/ethnic minority groups in the U.S. in the era of big data.

Todd I Herrenkohl

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Before joining the faculty at the University of Michigan in 2018 as Professor and Marion Elizabeth Blue Chair of Children and Families, I was Co-Director of the 3DL Partnership at the University of Washington, where I collaborated with academic colleagues, students, and service providers throughout the state to conduct and translate research on social emotional learning (SEL) and trauma-informed practices. I am now pursuing a similar line of research in Michigan, where I am collaborating with state partners and to identify, develop, and refine new approaches to disseminate research for schools and early childhood settings engaged in SEL and trauma work. As a scholar, I am committed to increasing the visibility, application, and sustainability of evidence-based programs and practices relevant to these topics and have worked extensively in the U.S. and internationally to advance goals for prevention and the promotion of child well-being.

Z. Tuba Suzer-Gurtekin

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Z. Tuba Suzer Gurtekin is an Assistant Research Scientist at the University of Michigan’s Institute for Social Research. Her research includes managing monthly surveys of consumer attitudes, expectations and behavior. Her published research focuses on methods to quantify nonresponse and measurement survey errors in probability and nonprobability sample surveys, and mixed-mode survey design and inference. Her research experience has included development of alternative sample, methodology and questionnaire designs, data collection and analysis methods for a general population in parallel survey modes. She also teaches Survey Sampling for Clinical Research at the University of Michigan’s Clinical Research Design and Statistical Analysis program (OJOC CRDSA).

John E Marcotte

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John E. Marcotte, PhD is a statistician and data security expert. His research concerns data sharing, data security, data management, disclosure, health policy, nursing staffing and patient outcomes. He has over 25 years of experience implementing computing systems and performing quantitative analysis. During his career, Marcotte has served as a quantitative researcher, biostatistician, data archivist, data security officer and computing director. Among Marcotte’s statistical fortes are linear and logistic regression, survival analysis and sampling while his computing specialties include secure systems, high performance systems and numerical methods. He has collaborated with social and natural scientists as well as nurses and physicians. Marcotte regularly presents at professional conferences and contributes to invited panels on data security and disclosure. He has formal training in Demography, Statistics and Computer Science.

Research Data Security Options

Michael Traugott

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Michael Traugott, PhD, is Professor Emeritus of Communication Studies, Professor Emeritus of Political Science, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, Research Professor Emeritus, Center for Political Studies and Adjunct Research Professor, Center for Political Studies, Institute for Social Research.

Professor Traugott studies the mass media and their impact on American politics. This includes research on the use of the media by candidates in their campaigns and its impact on voters, as well as the ways that campaigns are covered and the impact of this coverage on candidates. He has a particular interest in the use of surveys and polls and the way news organizations employ them to cover campaigns and elections.

Matthew Shapiro

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Prof. Shapiro is the Lawrence R. Klein Collegiate Professor of Economics, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts and Research Professor, Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Shapiro’s general area of research is macroeconomics. He has studied investment and capital utilization, business-cycle fluctuations, consumption and saving, financial markets, monetary policy, fiscal policy, and time-series econometrics. Among his current research interests are consumption, saving, retirement, and portfolio choices of households, the effects of tax policy on investment, using surveys in macroeconomics, and improving the quality of national economic statistics.

Zeina Mneimneh

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Dr. Zeina Mneimneh is Assistant Research Scientist in the University of Michigan Survey Research Center.

Her research focuses on the use of social media and neighborhood contextual information to study social and health science topics and involves a collaboration between Michigan and Georgetown University.