Davon Norris

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I try to understand how our tools for determining what is valuable, worthwhile, or good are implicated in patterns of inequality with an acute concern for racial inequality. Often, this means my work investigates the functioning and consequences of a range of scores or ratings, from the less complex government credit ratings to the extremely complex algorithmic scores like consumer credit scores.

In related work, as a part of a multi-university team of researchers, I am using administrative credit report data from one of the largest credit reporting agencies to study credit and debt outcomes for millions of consumers in the United States.

Susan Hautaniemi Leonard

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I am faculty at ICPSR, the largest social science data archive in the world. I manage an education research pre-registration site (sreereg.org) that is focused on transparency and replicability. I also manage a site for sharing work around record linkage, including code (linkagelibrary.org). I am involved in the LIFE-M project (life-m.org), recently classifying the mortality data. That project uses cutting-edge techniques for machine-reading handwritten forms.

Mortality rates for selected causes in the total population per 1,000, 1850–1912, Holyoke and Northampton, Massachusetts

Stefanus Jasin

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My research focus the application and development of new algorithms for solving complex business analytics problems. Applications vary from revenue management, dynamic pricing, marketing analytics, to retail logistics. In terms of methodology, I use a combination of operations research and machine learning/online optimization techniques.

 

Elizabeth F. S. Roberts

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“Neighborhood Environments as Socio-Techno-bio Systems: Water Quality, Public Trust, and Health in Mexico City (NESTSMX)” is an NSF-funded multi-year collaborative interdisciplinary project that brings together experts in environmental engineering, anthropology, and environmental health from the University of Michigan and the Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública. The PI is Elizabeth Roberts (anthropology), and the co-PIs are Brisa N. Sánchez (biostatistics), Martha M Téllez-Rojo (public health), Branko Kerkez (environmental engineering), and Krista Rule Wigginton (civil and environmental engineering). Our overarching goal for NESTSMX is to develop methods for understanding neighborhoods as “socio-techno-bio systems” and to understand how these systems relate to people’s trust in (or distrust of) their water. In the process, we will collectively contribute to our respective fields of study while we learn how to merge efforts from different disciplinary backgrounds.
NESTSMX works with families living in Mexico City, that participate in an ongoing longitudinal birth-cohort chemical-exposure study (ELEMENT (Early Life Exposures in Mexico to ENvironmental Toxicants, U-M School of Public Health). Our research involves ethnography and environmental engineering fieldwork which we will combine with biomarker data previously gathered by ELEMENT. Our focus will be on the infrastructures and social structures that move water in and out of neighborhoods, households, and bodies.

Testing Real-Time Domestic Water Sensors in Mexico City

Testing Real-Time Domestic Water Sensors in Mexico City

Fabian Pfeffer

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My research investigates social inequality and its maintenance across time and generations. Current projects focus on wealth inequality and its consequences for the next generation, the institutional context of social mobility processes and educational inequality in the United States and other industrialized countries. I also help expand the social science data infrastructure and quantitative methods needed to address questions on inequality and mobility. I serve as Principal Investigator of the Wealth and Mobility (WAM) study as well as Co-Investigator of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID). As such, my research draws on and helps construct nationally representative survey data as well as full-population administrative data. My methodological work has been focused on causal inference, multiple imputation, and measurement error.

Meha Jain

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​I am an Assistant Professor in the School for Environment and Sustainability at the University of Michigan and am part of the Sustainable Food Systems Initiative. My research examines the impacts of environmental change on agricultural production, and how farmers may adapt to reduce negative impacts. I also examine ways that we can sustainably enhance agricultural production. To do this work, I combine remote sensing and geospatial analyses with household-level and census datasets to examine farmer decision-making and agricultural production across large spatial and temporal scales.

Conducting wheat crop cuts to measure yield in India, which we use to train algorithms that map yield using satellite data

J.J. Prescott

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Broadly, I study legal decision making, including decisions related to crime and employment. I typically use large social science data bases, but also collect my own data using technology or surveys.