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Jeffrey Regier

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Jeffrey Regier received a PhD in statistics from UC Berkeley (2016) and joined the University of Michigan as an assistant professor. His research interests include graphical models, Bayesian inference, high-performance computing, deep learning, astronomy, and genomics.

Harm Derksen

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Current research includes a project funded by Toyota that uses Markov Models and Machine Learning to predict heart arrhythmia, an NSF-funded project to detect Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) from x-ray images and projects using tensor analysis on health care data (funded by the Department of Defense and National Science Foundation).

Kayvan Najarian

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The focus of Dr. Najarian’s research is on the design of signal/image processing and machine learning methods to create computer-assisted clinical decision support systems that improve patient care and reduce the costs of healthcare. Dr. Najarian’s lab also designs sensors to collect and analyze physiological signals and images. In particular, Dr. Najarian’s research focuses on creating decision support systems to manage traumatic brain injuries, traumatic pelvic/abdominal injuries and hypovolemia. Dr. Najarian’s research has been funded by agencies such as National Science Foundation and Department of Defense. He serves as the Editor-in-Chief of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology and the Associate Editor of two other journals in the field of biomedical informatics. He is also a member of the editorial board of many other journals and serves as the guest editor of special issues for several journals.

Raed Al Kontar

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My research broadly focuses on developing data analytics and decision-making methodologies specifically tailored for Internet of Things (IoT) enabled smart and connected products/systems. I envision that most (if not all) engineering systems will eventually become connected systems in the future. Therefore, my key focus is on developing next-generation data analytics, machine learning, individualized informatics and graphical and network modeling tools to truly realize the competitive advantages that are promised by smart and connected products/systems.

 

Srijan Sen

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Srijan Sen, MD, PhD, is the Frances and Kenneth Eisenberg Professor of Depression and Neurosciences. Dr. Sen’s research focuses on the interactions between genes and the environment and their effect on stress, anxiety, and depression. He also has a particular interest in medical education, and leads a large multi-institution study that uses medical internship as a model of stress.

Kathleen M Bergen

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Kathleen M Bergen, PhD, is Associate Research Scientist in the School for Environment and Sustainability at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Dr. Bergen currently has interim administrative oversight of the SEAS Environmental Spatial Analysis Laboratory (ESALab) and is interim Director of the campus-wide Graduate Certificate Program in Spatial Analysis.

Prof. Bergen works in the areas of human dimensions of environmental change; remote sensing, GIS and biodiversity informatics; and environmental health and informatics. Her focus is on combining field and geospatial data and methods to study the pattern and process of ecological systems, biodiversity and health. She also strives to build bridges between science and social science to understand the implications of human actions on the social and natural systems of which we are a part. She teaches courses in Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems. Formerly she served as a founding member of the UM LIbrary’s MIRLYN implementation team, directed the University Map Collection, and set up the M-Link reference information network.

Danny Forger

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Daniel Forger is a Professor in the Department of Mathematics. He is devoted to understanding biological clocks. He uses techniques from many fields, including computer simulation, detailed mathematical modeling and mathematical analysis, to understand biological timekeeping. His research aims to generate predictions that can be experimentally verified.

Suleyman Uludag

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My research spans security, privacy, and optimization of data collection particularly as applied to the Smart Grid, an augmented and enhanced paradigm for the conventional power grid. I am particularly interested in optimization approaches that take a notion of security and/or privacy into the modeling explicitly. At the intersection of the Intelligent Transportation Systems, Smart Grid, and Smart Cities, I am interested in data privacy and energy usage in smart parking lots. Protection of data and availability, especially under assault through a Denial-of-Service attacks, represents another dimension of my area of research interests. I am working on developing data privacy-aware bidding applications for the Smart Grid Demand Response systems without relying on trusted third parties. Finally, I am interested in educational and pedagogical research about teaching computer science, Smart Grid, cyber security, and data privacy.

This figure shows the data collection model I used in developing a practical and secure Machine-to-Machine data collection protocol for the Smart Grid.

This figure shows the data collection model I used in developing a practical and secure
Machine-to-Machine data collection protocol for the Smart Grid.

Jie Shen

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One of my research interests is in the digital diagnosis of material damage based on sensors, computational science and numerical analysis with large-scale 3D computed tomography data: (1) Establishment of a multi-resolution transformation rule of material defects. (2) Design of an accurate digital diagnosis method for material damage. (3) Reconstruction of defects in material domains from X-ray CT data . (4) Parallel computation of materials damage. My team also conducted a series of studies for improving the quality of large-scale laser scanning data in reverse engineering and industrial inspection: (1) Detection and removal of non-isolated Outlier Data Clusters (2) Accurate correction of surface data noise of polygonal meshes (3) Denoising of two-dimensional geometric discontinuities.

Another research focus is on the information fusion of large-scale data from autonomous driving. Our research is funded by China Natural Science Foundation with focus on (1) laser-based perception in degraded visual environment, (2) 3D pattern recognition with dynamic, incomplete, noisy point clouds, (3) real-time image processing algorithms in degraded visual environment, and (4) brain-computer interface to predict the state of drivers.

Processing and Analysis of 3D Large-Scale Engineering Data

Processing and Analysis of 3D Large-Scale Engineering Data

Matthew Johnson-Roberson

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Matthew Johnson-Roberson, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering and Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, College of Engineering, the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

The increasing economic and environmental pressures facing the planet require cost-effective technological solutions to monitor and predict the health of the earth. Increasing volumes of data and the geographic dispersion of researchers and data gathering sites has created new challenges for computer science. Remote collaboration and data abstraction offer the promise of aiding science for great social benefit. Prof. Johnson-Roberson’s research in this field has been focused on developing novel methods for the visualization and interpretation of massive environments from multiple sensing modalities and creating abstractions and reconstructions that allow natural scientists to predict and monitor the earth through remote collaboration. Through the promotion of these economically efficient solutions, his work aims to increase access to hundreds of scientific sites instantly without traveling. In undertaking this challenge he is constantly aiming to engage in research that will benefit society.

Traditional marine science surveys will capture large amounts of data regardless of the contents or the potential value of the data. In an exploratory context, scientists are typically interested in reviewing and mining data for unique geological or benthic features. This can be a difficult and time consuming task when confronted with thousands or tens of thousands of images. The technique shown here uses information theoretic methods to identify unusual images within large data sets.

Traditional marine science surveys will capture large amounts of data regardless of the contents or the potential value of the data. In an exploratory context, scientists are typically interested in reviewing and mining data for unique geological or benthic features. This can be a difficult and time consuming task when confronted with thousands or tens of thousands of images. The technique shown here uses information theoretic methods to identify unusual images within large data sets.