Explore ARCExplore ARC

Raed Al Kontar

By |

My research broadly focuses on developing data analytics and decision-making methodologies specifically tailored for Internet of Things (IoT) enabled smart and connected products/systems. I envision that most (if not all) engineering systems will eventually become connected systems in the future. Therefore, my key focus is on developing next-generation data analytics, machine learning, individualized informatics and graphical and network modeling tools to truly realize the competitive advantages that are promised by smart and connected products/systems.

 

Srijan Sen

By |

Srijan Sen, MD, PhD, is the Frances and Kenneth Eisenberg Professor of Depression and Neurosciences. Dr. Sen’s research focuses on the interactions between genes and the environment and their effect on stress, anxiety, and depression. He also has a particular interest in medical education, and leads a large multi-institution study that uses medical internship as a model of stress.

Kathleen M Bergen

By |

Kathleen M Bergen, PhD, is Associate Research Scientist in the School for Environment and Sustainability at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Dr. Bergen currently has interim administrative oversight of the SEAS Environmental Spatial Analysis Laboratory (ESALab) and is interim Director of the campus-wide Graduate Certificate Program in Spatial Analysis.

Prof. Bergen works in the areas of human dimensions of environmental change; remote sensing, GIS and biodiversity informatics; and environmental health and informatics. Her focus is on combining field and geospatial data and methods to study the pattern and process of ecological systems, biodiversity and health. She also strives to build bridges between science and social science to understand the implications of human actions on the social and natural systems of which we are a part. She teaches courses in Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems. Formerly she served as a founding member of the UM LIbrary’s MIRLYN implementation team, directed the University Map Collection, and set up the M-Link reference information network.

Danny Forger

By |

Daniel Forger is a Professor in the Department of Mathematics. He is devoted to understanding biological clocks. He uses techniques from many fields, including computer simulation, detailed mathematical modeling and mathematical analysis, to understand biological timekeeping. His research aims to generate predictions that can be experimentally verified.

Suleyman Uludag

By |

My research spans security, privacy, and optimization of data collection particularly as applied to the Smart Grid, an augmented and enhanced paradigm for the conventional power grid. I am particularly interested in optimization approaches that take a notion of security and/or privacy into the modeling explicitly. At the intersection of the Intelligent Transportation Systems, Smart Grid, and Smart Cities, I am interested in data privacy and energy usage in smart parking lots. Protection of data and availability, especially under assault through a Denial-of-Service attacks, represents another dimension of my area of research interests. I am working on developing data privacy-aware bidding applications for the Smart Grid Demand Response systems without relying on trusted third parties. Finally, I am interested in educational and pedagogical research about teaching computer science, Smart Grid, cyber security, and data privacy.

This figure shows the data collection model I used in developing a practical and secure Machine-to-Machine data collection protocol for the Smart Grid.

This figure shows the data collection model I used in developing a practical and secure
Machine-to-Machine data collection protocol for the Smart Grid.

Omid Dehzangi

By |

Omid Dehzangi, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Science, College of Engineering and Computer Science, at the University of Michigan, Dearborn.

Wearable health technology is drawing significant attention for good reasons. The pervasive nature of such systems providing ubiquitous access to the continuous personalized data will transform the way people interact with each other and their environment. The resulting information extracted from these systems will enable emerging applications in healthcare, wellness, emergency response, fitness monitoring, elderly care support, long-term preventive chronic care, assistive care, smart environments, sports, gaming, and entertainment which create many new research opportunities and transform researches from various disciplines into data science which is the methodological terminology for data collection, data management, data analysis, and data visualization. Despite the ground-breaking potentials, there are a number of interesting challenges in order to design and develop wearable medical embedded systems. Due to limited available resources in wearable processing architectures, power-efficiency is demanded to allow unobtrusive and long-term operation of the hardware. Also, the data-intensive nature of continuous health monitoring requires efficient signal processing and data analytic algorithms for real-time, scalable, reliable, accurate, and secure extraction of relevant information from an overwhelmingly large amount of data. Therefore, extensive research in their design, development, and assessment is necessary. Embedded Processing Platform Design The majority of my work concentrates on designing wearable embedded processing platforms in order to shift the conventional paradigms from hospital-centric healthcare with episodic and reactive focus on diseases to patient-centric and home-based healthcare as an alternative segment which demands outstanding specialized design in terms of hardware design, software development, signal processing and uncertainty reduction, data analysis, predictive modeling and information extraction. The objective is to reduce the costs and improve the effectiveness of healthcare by proactive early monitoring, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases (i.e. preventive) as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Embedded processing platform in healthcare

Jie Shen

By |

One of my research interests is in the digital diagnosis of material damage based on sensors, computational science and numerical analysis with large-scale 3D computed tomography data: (1) Establishment of a multi-resolution transformation rule of material defects. (2) Design of an accurate digital diagnosis method for material damage. (3) Reconstruction of defects in material domains from X-ray CT data . (4) Parallel computation of materials damage. My team also conducted a series of studies for improving the quality of large-scale laser scanning data in reverse engineering and industrial inspection: (1) Detection and removal of non-isolated Outlier Data Clusters (2) Accurate correction of surface data noise of polygonal meshes (3) Denoising of two-dimensional geometric discontinuities.

Another research focus is on the information fusion of large-scale data from autonomous driving. Our research is funded by China Natural Science Foundation with focus on (1) laser-based perception in degraded visual environment, (2) 3D pattern recognition with dynamic, incomplete, noisy point clouds, (3) real-time image processing algorithms in degraded visual environment, and (4) brain-computer interface to predict the state of drivers.

Processing and Analysis of 3D Large-Scale Engineering Data

Processing and Analysis of 3D Large-Scale Engineering Data

Matthew Johnson-Roberson

By |

Matthew Johnson-Roberson, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering and Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, College of Engineering, the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

The increasing economic and environmental pressures facing the planet require cost-effective technological solutions to monitor and predict the health of the earth. Increasing volumes of data and the geographic dispersion of researchers and data gathering sites has created new challenges for computer science. Remote collaboration and data abstraction offer the promise of aiding science for great social benefit. Prof. Johnson-Roberson’s research in this field has been focused on developing novel methods for the visualization and interpretation of massive environments from multiple sensing modalities and creating abstractions and reconstructions that allow natural scientists to predict and monitor the earth through remote collaboration. Through the promotion of these economically efficient solutions, his work aims to increase access to hundreds of scientific sites instantly without traveling. In undertaking this challenge he is constantly aiming to engage in research that will benefit society.

Traditional marine science surveys will capture large amounts of data regardless of the contents or the potential value of the data. In an exploratory context, scientists are typically interested in reviewing and mining data for unique geological or benthic features. This can be a difficult and time consuming task when confronted with thousands or tens of thousands of images. The technique shown here uses information theoretic methods to identify unusual images within large data sets.

Traditional marine science surveys will capture large amounts of data regardless of the contents or the potential value of the data. In an exploratory context, scientists are typically interested in reviewing and mining data for unique geological or benthic features. This can be a difficult and time consuming task when confronted with thousands or tens of thousands of images. The technique shown here uses information theoretic methods to identify unusual images within large data sets.

Raj Rao Nadakuditi

By |

Raj Nadakuditi, PhD, is Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, College of Engineering, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Nadakuditi received his Masters and PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT as part of the MIT/WHOI Joint Program in Ocean Science and Engineering. His work is at the interface of statistical signal processing and random matrix theory with applications such as sonar, radar, wireless communications and machine learning in mind.

Prof. Nadakuditi particularly enjoys using random matrix theory to address problems that arise in statistical signal processing. An important component of his work is applying it in real-world settings to tease out low-level signals from sensor, oceanographic, financial and econometric time/frequency measurements/time series. In addition to the satisfaction derived from transforming the theory into practice, real-world settings give us insight into how the underlying techniques can be refined and/or made more robust.