Zhongming Liu

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My research is at the intersection of neuroscience and artificial intelligence. My group uses neuroscience or brain-inspired principles to design models and algorithms for computer vision and language processing. In turn, we uses neural network models to test hypotheses in neuroscience and explain or predict human perception and behaviors. My group also develops and uses machine learning algorithms to improve the acquisition and analysis of medical images, including functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and magnetic resonance imaging of the gut.

We use brain-inspired neural networks models to predict and decode brain activity in humans processing information from naturalistic audiovisual stimuli.

Nikola Banovic

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My research focuses on methods, applications, and ethics of Computational Modeling in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). Understanding and modeling human behavior supports innovative information technology that will change how we study and design interactive user experiences. I envision modeling the human accurately across domains as a theoretical foundation for work in HCI in which computational models provide a foundation to study, describe, and understand complex human behaviors and support optimization and evaluation of user interfaces. I create technology that automatically reasons about and acts in response to people’s behavior to help them be productive, healthy, and safe.

Lucia Cevidanes

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We have developed and tested machine learning approaches to integrate quantitative markers for diagnosis and assessment of progression of TMJ OA, as well as extended the capabilities of 3D Slicer4 into web-based tools and disseminated open source image analysis tools. Our aims use data processing and in-depth analytics combined with learning using privileged information, integrated feature selection, and testing the performance of longitudinal risk predictors. Our long term goals are to improve diagnosis and risk prediction of TemporoMandibular Osteoarthritis in future multicenter studies.

The Spectrum of Data Science for Diagnosis of Osteoarthritis of the Temporomandibular Joint

Nicholas Douville

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Dr. Douville is a critical care anesthesiologist with an investigative background in bioinformatics and perioperative outcomes research. He studies techniques for utilizing health care data, including genotype, to deliver personalized medicine in the perioperative period and intensive care unit. His research background has focused on ways technology can assist health care delivery to improve patient outcomes. This began designing microfluidic chips capable of recreating fluid mechanics of atelectatic alveoli and monitoring the resulting barrier breakdown real-time. His interest in bioinformatics was sparked when he observed how methodology designed for tissue engineering could be modified to the nano-scale to enable genomic analysis. Additionally, his engineering training provided the framework to apply data-driven modeling techniques, such as finite element analysis, to complex biological systems.

Akbar Waljee

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I use machine-learning techniques to implement decision support systems and tools that facilitate more personalized care for disease management and healthcare utilization to ultimately deliver efficient, effective, and equitable therapy for chronic diseases. To test and advance these general principles, I have built operational programs that are guiding—and improving—patient care in costly in low resource settings, including emerging countries.

Lorraine Buis

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I conduct research on the use of consumer-facing technologies for chronic disease self management. My work predominantly centers on the use of mobile applications that collect and manage patient generated health data overt time.

Keith Aaronson, MD

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Dr. Aaronson is actively engaged in clinical practice and clinical research in the areas of heart failure, heart transplantation and mechanical circulatory support. His research has focused on improving health, quality of life and economic outcomes in these populations, utilizing methodologies ranging from small to large scale observational analyses, Markov modeling, meta-analyses, and both industry-sponsored and investigator-initiated randomized clinical trials of standard pharmaceutical interventions, alternative medicines, patient education and mechanical circulatory support. Dr. Aaronson has had a particular interest in modeling outcomes in advanced heart failure, heart transplantation and mechanical circulatory support to inform appropriate utilization of health resources.

Nicole Seiberlich

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My research involves developing novel data collection strategies and image reconstruction techniques for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. In order to accelerate data collection, we take advantage of features of MRI data, including sparsity, spatiotemporal correlations, and adherence to underlying physics; each of these properties can be leveraged to reduce the amount of data required to generate an image and thus speed up imaging time. We also seek to understand what image information is essential for radiologists in order to optimize MRI data collection and personalize the imaging protocol for each patient. We deploy machine learning algorithms and optimization techniques in each of these projects. In some of our work, we can generate the data that we need to train and test our algorithms using numerical simulations. In other portions, we seek to utilize clinical images, prospectively collected MRI data, or MRI protocol information in order to refine our techniques.

We seek to develop technologies like cardiac Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (cMRF), which can be used to efficiently collect multiple forms of information to distinguish healthy and diseased tissue using MRI. By using rapid methods like cMRF, quantitative data describing disease processes can be gathered quickly, enabling more and sicker patients can be assessed via MRI. These data, collected from many patients over time, can also be used to further refine MRI technologies for the assessment of specific diseases in a tailored, patient-specific manner.

Kathleen Sienko

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Age- and sensory-related deficits in balance function drastically impact quality of life and present long-term care challenges. Successful fall prevention programs include balance exercise regimes, designed to recover, retrain, or develop new sensorimotor strategies to facilitate functional mobility. Effective balance-training programs require frequent visits to the clinic and/or the supervision of a physical therapist; however, one-on-one guided training with a physical therapist is not scalable for long-term balance training preventative and therapeutic programs. To enable preventative and therapeutic at-home balance training, we aim to develop models for automatically 1) evaluating balance and, 2) delivering personalized training guidance for community dwelling OA and people with sensory disabilities.

Smart Phone Balance Trainer