Tayo Fabusuyi

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Tayo Fabusuyi is an assistant research scientist in the Human Factors Group at UMTRI. His research interests are in Urban Systems and Operations Research, specifically designing and implementing initiatives that support sustainable and resilient communities with a focus on efficiency and equity issues. Drawing on both quantitative and qualitative data, his research develops and applies hard and soft Operations Research methods to urban systems issues in a manner that emphasizes theory driven solutions with demonstrated value-added. A central theme of his research activities is the use of demand side interventions, via information and pricing strategies in influencing the public’s travel behavior with the objective of achieving more beneficial societal outcomes. Informed by the proliferation of big data and the influence of transportation in the urban sphere, these research activities are categorized broadly into three overlapping and interdependent areas – intelligent transportation systems (ITS), emerging mobility services and urban futures. Before joining the research faculty at UMTRI, Dr. Fabusuyi was a Planning Economist at the African Development Bank and an adjunct Economics faculty member at Carnegie Mellon University, where he received his Ph.D. in Engineering and Public Policy.

Salar Fattahi

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Today’s real-world problems are complex and large, often with overwhelmingly large number of unknown variables which render them doomed to the so-called “curse of dimensionality”. For instance, in energy systems, the system operators should solve optimal power flow, unit commitment, and transmission switching problems with tens of thousands of continuous and discrete variables in real time. In control systems, a long standing question is how to efficiently design structured and distributed controllers for large-scale and unknown dynamical systems. Finally, in machine learning, it is important to obtain simple, interpretable, and parsimonious models for high-dimensional and noisy datasets. Our research is motivated by two main goals: (1) to model these problems as tractable optimization problems; and (2) to develop structure-aware and scalable computational methods for these optimization problems that come equipped with certifiable optimality guarantees. We aim to show that exploiting hidden structures in these problems—such as graph-induced or spectral sparsity—is a key game-changer in the pursuit of massively scalable and guaranteed computational methods.

9.9.2020 MIDAS Faculty Research Pitch Video.

My research lies at the intersection of optimization, data analytics, and control.

Albert S. Berahas

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Albert S. Berahas is an Assistant Professor in the department of Industrial & Operations Engineering. His research broadly focuses on designing, developing and analyzing algorithms for solving large scale nonlinear optimization problems. Such problems are ubiquitous, and arise in a plethora of areas such as engineering design, economics, transportation, robotics, machine learning and statistics. Specifically, he is interested in and has explored several sub-fields of nonlinear optimization such as: (i) general nonlinear optimization algorithms, (ii) optimization algorithms for machine learning, (iii) constrained optimization, (iv) stochastic optimization, (v) derivative-free optimization, and (vi) distributed optimization.

9.9.2020 MIDAS Faculty Research Pitch Video.

John Silberholz

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Most of my research related to data science involves decision making around clinical trials. In particular, I am interested in how databases of past clinical trial results can inform future trial design and other decisions. Some of my work has involved using machine learning and mathematical optimization to design new combination therapies for cancer based on the results of past trials. Other work has used network meta-analysis to combine the results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to better summarize what is currently known about a disease, to design further trials that would be maximally informative, and to study the quality of the control arms used in Phase III trials (which are used for drug approvals). Other work combines toxicity data from clinical trials with toxicity data from other data sources (claims data and adverse event reporting databases) to accelerate detection of adverse drug reactions to newly approved drugs. Lastly, some of my work uses Bayesian inference to accelerate clinical trials with multiple endpoints, learning the link between different endpoints using past clinical trial results.

Ya’acov Ritov

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My main interest is theoretical statistics as implied to complex model from semiparametric to ultra high dimensional regression analysis. In particular the negative aspects of Bayesian and causal analysis as implemented in modern statistics.

An analysis of the position of SCOTUS judges.

Jim Omartian

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My research explores the interplay between corporate decisions and employee actions. I currently use anonymized mobile device data to observe individual behaviors, and employ both unsupervised and supervised machine learning techniques.

Robert Hampshire

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He develops and applies operations research, data science, and systems approaches to public and private service industries. His research focuses on the management and policy analysis of emerging networked industries and innovative mobility services such as smart parking, connected vehicles, autonomous vehicles, ride-hailing, bike sharing, and car sharing. He has worked extensively with both public and private sector partners worldwide. He is a queueing theorist that uses statistics, stochastic modeling, simulation and dynamic optimization.

Zhixin (Jason) Liu

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My research focuses on quantitative modeling approaches that help business or nonprofit institutions make efficient operational decisions. My research addresses decisions that are made: 1) on either a single independent operation or multiple integrated operations, and 2) by either a single party or multiple parties, most likely different supply chain members. I am specifically interested in the allocation of resources over time and/or among different parties, which often involve scheduling, i.e., the allocation of resources over time to optimize certain objectives, capacity allocation, i.e., the allocation of production capacity from supplier to retailers in a supply chain setting, and pricing, i.e., the determination of selling price of certain products. When multiple parties are involved, decisions can be made either cooperatively or non-cooperatively. The methodologies used in my work include game theory, real analysis, optimization, approximation, simulation, and statistics.

Prasad R. Shankar

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I am an assistant professor of Radiology and an clinical researcher in the division of abdominal radiology. I am the departmental Associate Chair for Quality and Safety and chair of our departmental quality/safety research group, the Michigan Radiology Quality Collaborative. I have strong clinical and research interests in prostate cancer diagnosis and testing-related quality of life. I am actively engaged in research efforts to optimize precision imaging selection, through the help of big data.