Mark P Van Oyen

By |

Efficient, low regret contextual multi-armed bandit approaches for real time learning including Thompson sampling, UCB, and knowledge gradient descent. Integration of optimization and predictive analytics for determining the time to next measurement, which modality to use, and the optimal control of risk factors to manage chronic disease. Integration of soft voting ensemble classifiers and multiple models Kalman filters for disease state prediction, Real-time (online) contextual multi-armed bandits integrated with optimization of hospital bed type dynamic control decisions for reducing 30-day readmission rates in hospitals. Robustness in system optimization when the system model is uncertain with emphasis on quantile regression forests, sample average approximation, robust optimization and distributionally robust optimization. Health care delivery systems models with prediction and control for inpatient and outpatient. Work has been done on Emergency Department redesign for improved patient flow; Capacity management and planning and scheduling for outpatient care, including integrated services networks; admission control with machine learning to ICUs, stepdown, and regular care units Surgical planning and scheduling for access delay control; Planning and scheduling for Clinical Research Units.

9.9.2020 MIDAS Faculty Research Pitch Video.

Machine learning, system modeling, and stochastic control can be used to slow the rate of glaucoma progression based on treatment aggressiveness options selected jointly with the patient.

Veera Baladandayuthapani

By |

Dr. Veera Baladandayuthapani is currently a Professor in the Department of Biostatistics at University of Michigan (UM), where he is also the Associate Director of the Center for Cancer Biostatistics. He joined UM in Fall 2018 after spending 13 years in the Department of Biostatistics at University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, where was a Professor and Institute Faculty Scholar and held adjunct appointments at Rice University, Texas A&M University and UT School of Public Health. His research interests are mainly in high-dimensional data modeling and Bayesian inference. This includes functional data analyses, Bayesian graphical models, Bayesian semi-/non-parametric models and Bayesian machine learning. These methods are motivated by large and complex datasets (a.k.a. Big Data) such as high-throughput genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics and proteomics as well as high-resolution neuro- and cancer- imaging. His work has been published in top statistical/biostatistical/bioinformatics and biomedical/oncology journals. He has also co-authored a book on Bayesian analysis of gene expression data. He currently holds multiple PI-level grants from NIH and NSF to develop innovative and advanced biostatistical and bioinformatics methods for big datasets in oncology. He has also served as the Director of the Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Cores for the Specialized Programs of Research Excellence (SPOREs) in Multiple Myeloma and Lung Cancer and Biostatistics&Bioinformatics platform leader for the Myeloma and Melanoma Moonshot Programs at MD Anderson. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He currently serves as an Associate Editor for Journal of American Statistical Association, Biometrics and Sankhya.

 

An example of horizontal (across cancers) and vertical (across multiple molecular platforms) data integration. Image from Ha et al (Nature Scientific Reports, 2018; https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-32682-x)

Jinseok Kim

By |

Jinseok Kim, Ph.D., is Research Assistant Professor in the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.  Prof. Kim works on resolving named entity ambiguity in large-scale scholarly data (publication, patent, and funding records) in digital libraries. Especially, his current research is focused on developing methods for disambiguating author and affiliation names at a digital library scale using various supervised machine learning approaches trained on automatically labeled data . Disambiguated data from multiple sources will be integrated to be analyzed for insights into research production, scientific collaboration, funding evaluation, and research policy at a national level.

Peter Adriaens

By |

My research focus is on the development and application of machine learning tools to large scale financial and unstructured (textual) data to extract, quantify and predict risk profiles and investment grade rating of private and public companies.  Example datasets include social media and financial aggregators such as Bloomberg, Pitchbook, and Privco.

9.9.2020 MIDAS Faculty Research Pitch Video.

Z. Morley Mao

By |

Z. Morley Mao, PhD, is Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, College of Engineering, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor campus.

Sriram Chandrasekaran

By |

Sriram Chandrasekaran, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering in the College of Engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Dr. Chandrasekaran’s Systems Biology lab develops computer models of biological processes to understand them holistically. Sriram is interested in deciphering how thousands of proteins work together at the microscopic level to orchestrate complex processes like embryonic development or cognition, and how this complex network breaks down in diseases like cancer. Systems biology software and algorithms developed by his lab are highlighted below and are available at http://www.sriramlab.org/software/.

– INDIGO (INferring Drug Interactions using chemoGenomics and Orthology) algorithm predicts how antibiotics prescribed in combinations will inhibit bacterial growth. INDIGO leverages genomics and drug-interaction data in the model organism – E. coli, to facilitate the discovery of effective combination therapies in less-studied pathogens, such as M. tuberculosis. (Ref: Chandrasekaran et al. Molecular Systems Biology 2016)

– GEMINI (Gene Expression and Metabolism Integrated for Network Inference) is a network curation tool. It allows rapid assessment of regulatory interactions predicted by high-throughput approaches by integrating them with a metabolic network (Ref: Chandrasekaran and Price, PloS Computational Biology 2013)

– ASTRIX (Analyzing Subsets of Transcriptional Regulators Influencing eXpression) uses gene expression data to identify regulatory interactions between transcription factors and their target genes. (Ref: Chandrasekaran et al. PNAS 2011)

– PROM (Probabilistic Regulation of Metabolism) enables the quantitative integration of regulatory and metabolic networks to build genome-scale integrated metabolic–regulatory models (Ref: Chandrasekaran and Price, PNAS 2010)

 

Research Overview: We develop computational algorithms that integrate omics measurements to create detailed genome-scale models of cellular networks. Some clinical applications of our algorithms include finding metabolic vulnerabilities in pathogens (M. tuberculosis) using PROM, and designing multi combination therapeutics for reducing antibiotic resistance using INDIGO.

Research Overview: We develop computational algorithms that integrate omics measurements to create detailed genome-scale models of cellular networks. Some clinical applications of our algorithms include finding metabolic vulnerabilities in pathogens (M. tuberculosis) using PROM, and designing multi combination therapeutics for reducing antibiotic resistance using INDIGO.

Jon Zelner

By |

Jon Zelner, PhD, is Assistant Professor in the department of Epidemiology in the University of Michigan School of Public Health. Dr. Zelner holds a second appointment in the Center for Social Epidemiology and Population Health.

Dr. Zelner’s research is focused on using spatial analysis, social network analyisis and dynamic modeling to prevent infectious diseases, with a focus on tuberculosis and diarrheal disease. Jon is also interested in understanding how the social and biological causes of illness interact to generate observable patterns of disease in space and in social networks, across outcomes ranging from infection to mental illness.

 

A large spatial cluster of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) cases in Lima, Peru is highlighted in red. A key challenge in my work is understanding why these cases cluster in space: can social, spatial, and genetic data tell us where transmission is occurring and how to interrupt it?

A large spatial cluster of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) cases in Lima, Peru is highlighted in red. A key challenge in my work is understanding why these cases cluster in space: can social, spatial, and genetic data tell us where transmission is occurring and how to interrupt it?

 

 

Adriene Beltz

By |

The goal of my research is to leverage network analysis techniques to uncover how the brain mediates sex hormone influences on gendered behavior across the lifespan. Specifically, my data science research concerns the creation and application of person-specific connectivity analyses, such as unified structural equation models, to time series data; these are intensive longitudinal data, including functional neuroimages, daily diaries, and observations. I then use these data science methods to investigate the links between androgens (e.g., testosterone) and estradiol at key developmental periods, such as puberty, and behaviors that typically show sex differences, including aspects of cognition and psychopathology.

A network map showing the directed connections among 25 brain regions of interest in the resting state frontoparietal network for an individual; data were acquired via functional magnetic resonance imaging. Black lines depict connections common across individuals in the sample, gray lines depict connections specific to this individual, solid lines depict contemporaneous connections (occurring in the same volume), and dashed lines depict lagged connections (occurring between volumes).

A network map showing the directed connections among 25 brain regions of interest in the resting state frontoparietal network for an individual; data were acquired via functional magnetic resonance imaging. Black lines depict connections common across individuals in the sample, gray lines depict connections specific to this individual, solid lines depict contemporaneous connections (occurring in the same volume), and dashed lines depict lagged connections (occurring between volumes).

Suleyman Uludag

By |

My research spans security, privacy, and optimization of data collection particularly as applied to the Smart Grid, an augmented and enhanced paradigm for the conventional power grid. I am particularly interested in optimization approaches that take a notion of security and/or privacy into the modeling explicitly. At the intersection of the Intelligent Transportation Systems, Smart Grid, and Smart Cities, I am interested in data privacy and energy usage in smart parking lots. Protection of data and availability, especially under assault through a Denial-of-Service attacks, represents another dimension of my area of research interests. I am working on developing data privacy-aware bidding applications for the Smart Grid Demand Response systems without relying on trusted third parties. Finally, I am interested in educational and pedagogical research about teaching computer science, Smart Grid, cyber security, and data privacy.

This figure shows the data collection model I used in developing a practical and secure Machine-to-Machine data collection protocol for the Smart Grid.

This figure shows the data collection model I used in developing a practical and secure
Machine-to-Machine data collection protocol for the Smart Grid.