Felipe da Veiga Lerprevost

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My research concentrates on the area of bioinformatics, proteomics, and data integration. I am particularly interested in mass spectrometry-based proteomics, software development for proteomics, cancer proteogenomics, and transcriptomics. The computational methods and tools previously developed by my colleagues and me, such as PepExplorer, MSFragger, Philosopher, and PatternLab for Proteomics, are among the most referred proteome informatics tools and are used by hundreds of laboratories worldwide.

I am also a Proteogenomics Data Analysis Center (UM-PGDAC) member as part of the NCI’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) initiative for processing and analyzing hundreds of cancer proteomics samples. UM-PGDAC develops advanced computational infrastructure for comprehensive and global characterization of genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics data collected from several human tumor cohorts using NCI-provided biospecimens. Since 2019 I have been working as a bioinformatics data analyst with the University of Michigan Proteomics Resource Facility, which provides state-of-the-art capabilities in proteomics to the University of Michigan investigators, including Rogel Cancer Center investigators as Proteomics Shared Resource.

Eric Gilbert

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Eric Gilbert is the John Derby Evans Associate Professor in the School of Information—and a Professor in CSE—at the University of Michigan. Before coming to Michigan, he led the comp.social lab at Georgia Tech. Dr. Gilbert is a sociotechnologist, with a research focus on building and studying social media systems. His work has been supported by grants from Facebook, Samsung, Yahoo!, Google, NSF, ARL, and DARPA. Dr. Gilbert’s work has been recognized with multiple best paper awards, as well as covered by outlets including Wired, NPR and The New York Times. He is the recipient of an NSF CAREER award and the Sigma Xi Young Faculty Award. Professor Gilbert holds a BS in Math & CS and a PhD in CS—both from from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Ranjan Pal

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Cyber-security is a complex and multi-dimensional research field. My research style comprises an inter-disciplinary (primarily rooted in economics, econometrics, data science (AI/ML/Bayesian and Frequentist Statistics), game theory, and network science) investigation of major socially pressing issues impacting the quality of cyber-risk management in modern networked and distributed engineering systems such as IoT-driven critical infrastructures, cloud-based service networks, and app-based systems (e.g., mobile commerce, smart homes) to name a few. I take delight in proposing data-driven, rigorous, and interdisciplinary solutions to both, existing fundamental challenges that pose a practical bottleneck to (cost) effective cyber-risk management, and futuristic cyber-security and privacy issues that might plague modern (networked) engineering systems. I strongly strive for originality, practical significance, and mathematical rigor in my solutions. One of my primary end goals is to conceptually get arms around complex, multi-dimensional information security and privacy problems in a way that helps, informs, and empowers practitioners and policy makers to take the right steps in making the cyber-space more secure.

Stephan F. Taylor

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STEPHAN F. TAYLOR is a professor of psychiatry and Associate Chair for Research and Research Regulatory Affairs in the Department of Psychiatry; and an adjunct professor of psychology.

His work uses brain mapping and brain stimulation to study and treat serious mental disorders such as psychosis, refractory depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Data science techniques area applied in the analysis of high dimensional functional magnetic resonance imaging datasets and meso-scale brain networks, using supervised and unsupervised techniques to interrogate brain-behavior correlations relevant for psychopathological conditions. Clinical-translation work with brain stimulation, primarily with transcranial magnetic stimulation, is informed by mapping meso-scale networks to guide treatment of conditions such as depression. Future work seeks to use machine learning to identify treatment predictors and match individual patients to specific treatments.

Jian Kang

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Dr. Kang’s research focuses on the developments of statistical methods motivated by biomedical applications with a focus on neuroimaging. His recent key contributions can be summarized in the following three aspects:

Bayesian regression for complex biomedical applications
Dr. Kang and his group developed a series of Bayesian regression methods for the association analysis between the clinical outcome of interests (disease diagnostics, survival time, psychiatry scores) and the potential biomarkers in biomedical applications such as neuroimaging and genomics. In particular, they developed a new class of threshold priors as compelling alternatives to classic continuous shrinkages priors in Bayesian literatures and widely used penalization methods in frequentist literatures. Dr. Kang’s methods can substantially increase the power to detect weak but highly dependent signals by incorporating useful structural information of predictors such as spatial proximity within brain anatomical regions in neuroimaging [Zhao et al 2018; Kang et al 2018, Xue et al 2019] and gene networks in genomics [Cai et al 2017; Cai et al 2019]. Dr Kang’s methods can simultaneously select variables and evaluate the uncertainty of variable selection, as well as make inference on the effect size of the selected variables. His works provide a set of new tools for biomedical researchers to identify important biomarkers using different types of biological knowledge with statistical guarantees. In addition, Dr. Kang’s work is among the first to establish rigorous theoretical justifications for Bayesian spatial variable selection in imaging data analysis [Kang et al 2018] and Bayesian network marker selection in genomics [Cai et al 2019]. Dr. Kang’s theoretical contributions not only offer a deep understanding of the soft-thresholding operator on smooth functions, but also provide insights on which types of the biological knowledge may be useful to improve biomarker detection accuracy.

Prior knowledge guided variable screening for ultrahigh-dimensional data
Dr. Kang and his colleagues developed a series of variable screening methods for ultrahigh-dimensional data analysis by incorporating the useful prior knowledge in biomedical applications including imaging [Kang et al 2017, He et al 2019], survival analysis [Hong et al 2018] and genomics [He et al 2019]. As a preprocessing step for variable selection, variable screening is a fast-computational approach to dimension reduction. Traditional variable screening methods overlook useful prior knowledge and thus the practical performance is unsatisfying in many biomedical applications. To fill this gap, Dr. Kang developed a partition-based ultrahigh-dimensional variable screening method under generalized linear model, which can naturally incorporate the grouping and structural information in biomedical applications. When prior knowledge is unavailable or unreliable, Dr. Kang proposed a data-driven partition screening framework on covariate grouping and investigate its theoretical properties. The two special cases proposed by Dr. Kang: correlation-guided partitioning and spatial location guided partitioning are practically extremely useful for neuroimaging data analysis and genome-wide association analysis. When multiple types of grouping information are available, Dr. Kang proposed a novel theoretically justified strategy for combining screening statistics from various partitioning methods. It provides a very flexible framework for incorporating different types of prior knowledge.

Brain network modeling and inferences
Dr. Kang and his colleagues developed several new statistical methods for brain network modeling and inferences using resting-state fMRI data [Kang et al 2016, Xie and Kang 2017, Chen et al 2018]. Due to the high dimensionality of fMRI data (over 100,000 voxels in a standard brain template) with small sample sizes (hundreds of participants in a typical study), it is extremely challenging to model the brain functional connectivity network at voxel-levels. Some existing methods model brain anatomical region-level networks using the region-level summary statistics computed from voxel-level data. Those methods may suffer low power to detect the signals and have an inflated false positive rate, since the summary statistics may not well capture the heterogeneity within the predefined brain regions. To address those limitations, Dr. Kang proposed a novel method based on multi-attribute canonical correlation graphs [Kang et al 2016] to construct region-level brain network using voxel-level data. His method can capture different types of nonlinear dependence between any two brain regions consisting of hundreds or thousands of voxels. He also developed permutation tests for assessing the significance of the estimated network. His methods can largely increase power to detect signals for small sample size problems. In addition, Dr. Kang and his colleague also developed theoretically justified high-dimensional tests [Xie and Kang 2017] for constructing region-level brain networks using the voxel-level data under the multivariate normal assumption. Their theoretical results provide a useful guidance for the future development of statistical methods and theory for brain network analysis.

 

This image illustrates the neuroimaging meta-analysis data (Kang etal 2014). Neuroimaging meta-analysis is an important tool for finding consistent effects over studies. We develop a Bayesian nonparametric model and perform a meta-analysis of five emotions from 219 studies. In addition, our model can make reverse inference by using the model to predict the emotion type from a newly presented study. Our method outperforms other methods with an average of 80% accuracy.

1. Cai Q, Kang J, Yu T (2020) Bayesian variable selection over large scale networks via the thresholded graph Laplacian Gaussian prior with application to genomics. Bayesian Analysis, In Press (Earlier version won a student paper award from Biometrics Section of the ASA in JSM 2017)
2. He K, Kang J, Hong G, Zhu J, Li Y, Lin H, Xu H, Li Y (2019) Covariance-insured screening. Computational Statistics and Data Analysis: 132, 100—114.
3. He K, Xu H, Kang J† (2019) A selective overview of feature screening methods with applications to neuroimaging data, WRIES Computational Statistics, 11(2) e1454
4. Chen S, Xing Y, Kang J, Kochunov P, Hong LE (2018). Bayesian modeling of dependence in brain connectivity, Biostatistics, In Press.
5. Kang J, Reich BJ, Staicu AM (2018) Scalar-on-image regression via the soft thresholded Gaussian process. Biometrika: 105(1) 165–184.
6. Xue W, Bowman D and Kang J (2018) A Bayesian spatial model to predict disease status using imaging data from various modalities. Frontiers in Neuroscience. 12:184. doi:10.3389/fnins.2018.00184
7. Jin Z*, Kang J†, Yu T (2018) Missing value imputation for LC-MS metabolomics data by incorporating metabolic network and adduct ion relations. Bioinformatics, 34(9):1555—1561.
8. He K, Kang J† (2018) Comments on “Computationally efficient multivariate spatio-temporal models for high-dimensional count-valued data “. Bayesian Analysis, 13(1) 289-291.
9. Hong GH, Kang J†, Li Y (2018) Conditional screening for ultra-high dimensional covariates with survival outcomes. Lifetime Data Analysis: 24(1) 45-71.
10. Zhao Y*, Kang J†, Long Q (2018) Bayesian multiresolution variable selection for ultra-high dimensional neuroimaging data. IEEE/ACM Transactions on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, 15(2):537-550. (Earlier version won student paper award from ASA section on statistical learning and data mining in JSM 2014; It was also ranked as one of the top two papers in the student paper award competition in ASA section on statistics in imaging in JSM 2014)
11. Kang J, Hong GH, Li Y (2017) Partition-based ultrahigh dimensional variable screening, Biometrika, 104(4): 785-800.
12. Xie J#, Kang J# (2017) High dimensional tests for functional networks of brain anatomic regions. Journal of Multivariate Analysis, 156:70-88.
13. Cai Q*, Alvarez JA, Kang J†, Yu T (2017) Network marker selection for untargeted LC/MS metabolomics data, Journal of Proteome Research, 16(3):1261-1269
14. Kang J, Bowman FD, Mayberg H, Liu H (2016) A depression network of functionally connected regions discovered via multi-attribute canonical correlation graphs. NeuroImage, 41:431-441.

Walter Dempsey

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Dr. Dempsey’s research focuses on statistical methods for digital and mobile health. My current work involves three complementary research themes: (1) experimental design and data analytic methods to inform multi-stage decision making in health; (2) statistical modeling of complex longitudinal and survival data; and (3) statistical modeling of complex relational structures such as interaction networks. Current directions include (1) integration of sequential multiple assignment randomized trials (SMARTs) and micro-randomized trials (MRTs) and associated causal inference methods; (2) recurrent event analysis in the presence of high-frequency sensor data; and (3) temporal models for, community detection of, and link prediction using complex interaction data.

Sunghee Lee

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My research focuses on issues in data collection with hard-to-reach populations. In particular, she examines 1) nontraditional sampling approaches for minority or stigmatized populations and their statistical properties and 2) measurement error and comparability issues for racial, ethnic and linguistic minorities, which also have implications for cross-cultural research/survey methodology. Most recently, my research has been dedicated to respondent driven sampling that uses existing social networks to recruit participants in both face-to-face and Web data collection settings. I plan to expand my research scope in examining representation issues focusing on the racial/ethnic minority groups in the U.S. in the era of big data.

Zhen Hu

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I am an assistant professor in Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering (IMSE) at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. Prior to joining UM-Dearborn, I was a research assistant professor and postdoctoral research scholar at Vanderbilt University. My research areas of interest are uncertainty quantification, Bayesian data analytics, big data analytics, machine learning, optimization under uncertainty, and applications of data analytics and machine learning in aerospace, mechanical and manufacturing systems, and material science. The goal of my research is to develop novel computational methods to design sustainable and reliable engineering systems by leveraging the rich information contained in the high-fidelity computational simulation models, experimental data, and big operational data and historical data.