Satish Narayanasamy

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Satish Narayanasamy, Ph.D., is Associate Professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science department in the College of Engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Satish’s interests are working at the intersection of computer architecture, software systems and program analysis. His current interests include concurrency, security, customized architectures and tools for mobile and web applications, machine learning assisted program analysis, and tools for teaching at scale.

Z. Morley Mao

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Z. Morley Mao, PhD, is Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, College of Engineering, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor campus.

Luis E. Ortiz

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Luis Ortiz, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Science, College of Engineering and Computer Science, The University of Michigan, Dearborn

The study of large complex systems of structured strategic interaction, such as economic, social, biological, financial, or large computer networks, provides substantial opportunities for fundamental computational and scientific contributions. Luis’ research focuses on problems emerging from the study of systems involving the interaction of a large number of “entities,” which is my way of abstractly and generally capturing individuals, institutions, corporations, biological organisms, or even the individual chemical components of which they are made (e.g., proteins and DNA). Current technology has facilitated the collection and public availability of vasts amounts of data, particularly capturing system behavior at fine levels of granularity. In Luis’ group, they study behavioral data of strategic nature at big data levels. One of their main objectives is to develop computational tools for data science, and in particular learning large-population models from such big sources of behavioral data that we can later use to study, analyze, predict and alter future system behavior at a variety of scales, and thus improve the overall efficiency of real-world complex systems (e.g., the smart grid, social and political networks, independent security and defense systems, and microfinance markets, to name a few).

Puneet Manchanda

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My interest is in using econometrics, especially Bayesian econometrics, and machine learning methods to infer causality. I tend to work with mostly parametric models of firm and consumer behavior to assess the effectiveness of firm actions. My work spans a variety of industries such as pharmaceuticals, e-commerce, gaming and hi-technology.

Kevin Ward

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Kevin Ward, MD, is Professor of Emergency Medicine in the department of Emergency Medicine in the University of Michigan Medical School.

Dr. Ward is the director of the Weil Institute for Critical Care Research and Innovation. Dr. Ward’s research interests span the field of critical illness and injury ranging from combat casualty care to the intensive care unit. His approach is to develop and leverage broad platform technologies capable of use throughout all echelons of care of the critically ill and injured as well as in all age groups. Dr. Ward’s work has been funded by the NIH, Department of Defense, NSF, and industry.

 

Ambuj Tewari

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My research group is engaged in fundamental research in the following areas: Statistical learning theory: We are developing theory and algorithms for predictions problems (e.g., learning to rank and multilabel learning) with complex label spaces and where the available human supervision is often weak. Sequential prediction in a game theoretic framework: We are trying to understand the power and limitations of sequential predictions algorithms when no probabilistic assumptions are placed on the data generating mechanism. High dimensional and network data analysis: We are developing scalable algorithms with provable performance guarantees for learning from high dimensional and network data. Optimization algorithms: We are creating incremental, distributed and parallel algorithms for machine learning problems arising in today’s data rich world. Reinforcement learning: We are synthesizing concepts and techniques from artificial intelligence, control theory and operations research for pushing the frontier in sequential decision making with a focus on delivering personalized health interventions via mobile devices. My research group is pursuing and continues to actively search for challenging machine learning problems that arise across disciplines including behavioral sciences, computational biology, computational chemistry, learning sciences, and network science.

Research to deliver personalized interventions in real-time via people's mobile devices

Research to deliver personalized interventions in real-time via people’s mobile devices