Karandeep Singh

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I direct the Machine Learning for Learning Health Systems lab, whose work focuses on developing, validating, and evaluating the effectiveness of machine learning models within health systems. This includes projects such as a machine learning-supported patient educational platform (https://ask.musicurology.com) to support decision-making for patients with urological conditions. In additional to my predictive modeling research, I study patient-facing mobile apps and have published on this topic in Health Affairs, the Journal of General Internal Medicine, and the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, among others. I have additional leadership roles that recognize my expertise in machine learning at a local and regional level. I chair the Michigan Medicine Clinical Intelligence Committee, which oversees implementation of predictive models across our health system, and I serve on the Michigan Economic Development Corporation’s Artificial Intelligence Advisory Board, where I contribute to the state of Michigan’s vision on artificial intelligence. I also teach a health data science and machine learning course to over 60 graduate students per year.

Akbar Waljee

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I use machine-learning techniques to implement decision support systems and tools that facilitate more personalized care for disease management and healthcare utilization to ultimately deliver efficient, effective, and equitable therapy for chronic diseases. To test and advance these general principles, I have built operational programs that are guiding—and improving—patient care in costly in low resource settings, including emerging countries.

Andrew J. Admon, MD, MPH, MSc

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I am a pulmonary and critical care physician who is passionate about improving critical care delivery by applying advanced methods for causal inference to observational data. My prior work has leveraged real-world data clinical and administrative data to study the epidemiology of critical illness, the organization of critical care, and health care financing.

My current work leverages real-world clinical data to understand whether and how care team fragmentation (transitions of physicians and other providers while a patient is still hospitalized) influences clinical outcomes like survival and recovery. Answering these questions correctly requires methods that are attentive to the complex causal structure underlying the relationship, depicted here. It features time-varying exposures (A), confounders (L), and mediators (M), all of which can influence clinical outcomes (Y). Arrows in the figure identify directional (i.e., causal) relationships between variables.

Timothy C. Guetterman

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Timothy C. Guetterman is a methodologist focused on research design and mixed methods research. His research interests include advancing rigorous methods of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research, particularly strategies for intersecting and integrating qualitative and quantitative research. Tim is the PI of NIH-funded research that uses quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research to investigate the use of virtual human technology in health, education, and assessment. He has been applying natural language processing techniques to the analysis of mixed methods datasets. He also conducts research on teaching, learning, and developing research methods capacity as Co-PI of a William T. Grant Foundation qualitative and mixed methods research capacity building grant and in his role as evaluator and Co-I for the NIH-funded Mixed Methods Research Training Program for the Health Sciences. Tim has extensive professional experience conducting program evaluation with a focus on educational and healthcare programs.

Lorraine Buis

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I conduct research on the use of consumer-facing technologies for chronic disease self management. My work predominantly centers on the use of mobile applications that collect and manage patient generated health data overt time.

Halil Bisgin

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My research is focused on a wide range of topics from computational social sciences to bioinformatics where I do pattern recognition, perform data analysis, and build prediction models. At the core of my effort, there lie machine learning methods by which I have been trying to address problems related to social networks, opinion mining, biomarker discovery, pharmacovigilance, drug repositioning, security analytics, genomics, food contamination, and concussion recovery. I’m particularly interested in and eager to collaborate on cyber security aspect of social media analytics that includes but not limited to misinformation, bots, and fake news. In addition, I’m still pursuing opportunities in bioinformatics, especially about next generation sequencing analysis that can be also leveraged for phenotype predictions by using machine learning methods.

A typical pipeline for developing and evaluating a prediction models to identify malicious Android mobile apps in the market

Kean Ming Tan

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I am an applied statistician working on statistical machine learning methods for analyzing complex biomedical data sets. I develop multivariate statistical methods such as probabilistic graphical models, cluster analysis, discriminant analysis, and dimension reduction to uncover patterns from massive data set. Recently, I also work on topics related to robust statistics, non-convex optimization, and data integration from multiple sources.

Jie Liu

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Dr. Liu’s research lab aims to develop machine learning approaches for real-world bioinformatics and medical informatics problems. We believe that computational methods are essential in order to understand many of these molecular biology problems, including the dynamics of genome conformation and nuclear organization, gene regulation, cellular networks, and the genetic basis of human diseases.

The first computational embedding method for single cells in terms of their chromatin organization.

Christopher E. Gillies

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I am Research Faculty with the Michigan Center for Integrative Research in Critical Care (MCIRCC). Our team builds predictive algorithms, analyzes signals, and implements statistical models to advance Critical Care Medicine. We use electronic healthcare record data to build predictive algorithms. One example of this is Predicting Intensive Care Transfers and other Unforeseen Events (PICTURE), which uses commonly collected vital signs and labs to predict patient deterioration on the general hospital floor. Additionally, our team collects waveforms from the University Hospital, and we store this data utilizing Amazon Web Services. We use these signals to build predictive algorithms to advance precision medicine. Our flagship algorithm called Analytic for Hemodynamic Instability (AHI), predicts patient deterioration using a single-lead electrocardiogram signal. We use Bayesian methods to analyze metabolomic biomarker data from blood and exhaled breath to understand Sepsis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. I also have an interest in statistical genetics.