Negar Farzaneh

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Dr. Farzaneh’s research interest centers on the application of computer science, in particular, machine learning, signal processing, and computer vision, to develop clinical decision support systems and solve medical problems.

Trishul Kapoor

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Our research is focused on Post ICU pain syndromes (PIPS). PIPS exhibit distinct phenotypic presentations and can be predicted by intra-ICU parameters. Our primary goal is to be able to predict post-ICU opioid use based on intra-ICU parameters. We utilize a data-driven characterization of post-ICU pain syndromes will utilize unsupervised clustering algorithms including DBSCAN and spectral clustering. Prediction of post-discharge pain severity, likelihood of specific pain presentations, and post-discharge opioid use will be achieved using logistic LASSO, random forests, and neural networks. Specifically, these tests will utilize available ICU data to predict changes between pre-
and post-ICU pain severity, incidence of specific pain presentations, and incidence of opioid use.

This is a representation of enhancement of human cognition and clinical intelligence with artificial intelligence.

This is a representation of enhancement of human cognition and clinical intelligence with artificial intelligence.

Lubomir Hadjiyski

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Dr. Hadjiyski research interests include computer-aided diagnosis, artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, predictive models, image processing and analysis, medical imaging, and control systems. His current research involves design of decision support systems for detection and diagnosis of cancer in different organs and quantitative analysis of integrated multimodality radiomics, histopathology and molecular biomarkers for treatment response monitoring using AI and machine learning techniques. He also studies the effect of the decision support systems on the physicians’ clinical performance.

Yasser Aboelkassem

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In this project, we use multi-scale models coupled with machine learning algorithms to study cardiac electromechanic coupling. The approach spans out the molecular, Brownian, and Langevin dynamics of the contractile (sarcomeric proteins) mechanism of cardiac cells and up-to-the finite element analysis of the tissue and organ levels. In this work, a novel surrogate machine learning algorithm for the sarcomere contraction is developed. The model is trained and established using in-silico data-driven dynamic sampling procedures implemented using our previously derived myofilament mathematical models.

Multi-scale Machine Learning Modeling of Cardiac Electromechanics Coupling

Multi-scale Machine Learning Modeling of Cardiac Electromechanics Coupling

Elle O’Brien

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My research focuses on building infrastructure for public health and health science research organizations to take advantage of cloud computing, strong software engineering practices, and MLOps (machine learning operations). By equipping biomedical research groups with tools that facilitate automation, better documentation, and portable code, we can improve the reproducibility and rigor of science while scaling up the kind of data collection and analysis possible.

Research topics include:
1. Open source software and cloud infrastructure for research,
2. Software development practices and conventions that work for academic units, like labs or research centers, and
3. The organizational factors that encourage best practices in reproducibility, data management, and transparency

The practice of science is a tug of war between competing incentives: the drive to do a lot fast, and the need to generate reproducible work. As data grows in size, code increases in complexity and the number of collaborators and institutions involved goes up, it becomes harder to preserve all the “artifacts” needed to understand and recreate your own work. Technical AND cultural solutions will be needed to keep data-centric research rigorous, shareable, and transparent to the broader scientific community.

View MIDAS Faculty Research Pitch, Fall 2021

 

Jodyn Platt

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Our team leads research on the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) of learning health systems and related enterprises. Our research uses mixed methods to understand policies and practices that make data science methods (data collection and curation, AI, computable algorithms) trustworthy for patients, providers, and the public. Our work engages multiple stakeholders including providers and health systems, as well as the general public and minoritized communities on issues such as AI-enabled clinical decision support, data sharing and privacy, and consent for data use in precision oncology.

Sardar Ansari

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I build data science tools to address challenges in medicine and clinical care. Specifically, I apply signal processing, image processing and machine learning techniques, including deep convolutional and recurrent neural networks and natural language processing, to aid diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of patients with acute and chronic conditions. In addition, I conduct research on novel approaches to represent clinical data and combine supervised and unsupervised methods to improve model performance and reduce the labeling burden. Another active area of my research is design, implementation and utilization of novel wearable devices for non-invasive patient monitoring in hospital and at home. This includes integration of the information that is measured by wearables with the data available in the electronic health records, including medical codes, waveforms and images, among others. Another area of my research involves linear, non-linear and discrete optimization and queuing theory to build new solutions for healthcare logistic planning, including stochastic approximation methods to model complex systems such as dispatch policies for emergency systems with multi-server dispatches, variable server load, multiple priority levels, etc.

Lana Garmire

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My research interest lies in applying data science for actionable transformation of human health from the bench to bedside. Current research focus areas include cutting edge single-cell sequencing informatics and genomics; precision medicine through integration of multi-omics data types; novel modeling and computational methods for biomarker research; public health genomics. I apply my biomedical informatics and analytical expertise to study diseases such as cancers, as well the impact of pregnancy/early life complications on later life diseases.

Carlos Aguilar

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The Aguilar group is focused understanding transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms of skeletal muscle stem cells in diverse contexts such as regeneration after injury and aging. We focus on this area because there are little to no therapies for skeletal muscle after injury or aging. We use various types of in-vivo and in-vitro models in combination with genomic assays and high-throughput sequencing to study these molecular mechanisms.

Xu Shi

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My methodological research focus on developing statistical methods for routinely collected healthcare databases such as electronic health records (EHR) and claims data. I aim to tackle the unique challenges that arise from the secondary use of real-world data for research purposes. Specifically, I develop novel causal inference methods and semiparametric efficiency theory that harness the full potential of EHR data to address comparative effectiveness and safety questions. I develop scalable and automated pipelines for curation and harmonization of EHR data across healthcare systems and coding systems.