Gary Luker

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We use a variety of quantitative imaging methods, ranging from single cells to clinical studies, to investigate cancer signaling and response to therapy over space and time. We develop image analysis methods to extract data from thousands of single cells over time and voxel-wise measurements of imaging parameters. We also use bulk and single-cell RNA sequencing to investigate heterogeneity among cancer cells and changes induced by intercellular interactions. A current goal of our ongoing work is to merge RNA sequencing and imaging data to understand cell decision making in cancer. We collaborate with investigators using machine learning and computational modeling approaches to inform cell signaling and resultant behaviors in tumor growth and metastasis.

Lana Garmire

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My research interest lies in applying data science for actionable transformation of human health from the bench to bedside. Current research focus areas include cutting edge single-cell sequencing informatics and genomics; precision medicine through integration of multi-omics data types; novel modeling and computational methods for biomarker research; public health genomics. I apply my biomedical informatics and analytical expertise to study diseases such as cancers, as well the impact of pregnancy/early life complications on later life diseases.

Mihaela (Miki) Banu

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In the area of multi-scale modeling of manufacturing processes: (a) Models for understanding the mechanisms of forming and joining of lightweight materials. This new understanding enables the development of advanced processes which remove limitations of current state-of-the-art capabilities that exhibit limited formability of high strength lightweight alloys, and limited reproducibility of joining quality; (b) Innovative multi-scale finite element models for ultrasonic welding of battery tabs (resulting in models adopted by GM for designing and manufacturing batteries for the Chevy Volt), and multi-scale models for ultrasonic welding of short carbon fiber composites (resulting in models adopted by GM for designing and manufacturing assemblies made of carbon fiber composites with metallic parts); (c) Data-driven algorithms of prediction geometrical and microstructural integrity of the incremental formed parts. Machine learning is used for developing fast and robust methods to be integrated into the designing process and replace finite element simulations.

Stephan F. Taylor

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STEPHAN F. TAYLOR is a professor of psychiatry and Associate Chair for Research and Research Regulatory Affairs in the Department of Psychiatry; and an adjunct professor of psychology.

His work uses brain mapping and brain stimulation to study and treat serious mental disorders such as psychosis, refractory depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Data science techniques area applied in the analysis of high dimensional functional magnetic resonance imaging datasets and meso-scale brain networks, using supervised and unsupervised techniques to interrogate brain-behavior correlations relevant for psychopathological conditions. Clinical-translation work with brain stimulation, primarily with transcranial magnetic stimulation, is informed by mapping meso-scale networks to guide treatment of conditions such as depression. Future work seeks to use machine learning to identify treatment predictors and match individual patients to specific treatments.

Nambi Nallasamy

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Our team develops machine learning algorithms for the enhancement of outcomes in cataract surgery, the most commonly performed surgery in the world. Our works focuses on developing models for postoperative refraction after cataract surgery and analysis of surgical quality.

Zhongming Liu

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My research is at the intersection of neuroscience and artificial intelligence. My group uses neuroscience or brain-inspired principles to design models and algorithms for computer vision and language processing. In turn, we uses neural network models to test hypotheses in neuroscience and explain or predict human perception and behaviors. My group also develops and uses machine learning algorithms to improve the acquisition and analysis of medical images, including functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and magnetic resonance imaging of the gut.

We use brain-inspired neural networks models to predict and decode brain activity in humans processing information from naturalistic audiovisual stimuli.

Lucia Cevidanes

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We have developed and tested machine learning approaches to integrate quantitative markers for diagnosis and assessment of progression of TMJ OA, as well as extended the capabilities of 3D Slicer4 into web-based tools and disseminated open source image analysis tools. Our aims use data processing and in-depth analytics combined with learning using privileged information, integrated feature selection, and testing the performance of longitudinal risk predictors. Our long term goals are to improve diagnosis and risk prediction of TemporoMandibular Osteoarthritis in future multicenter studies.

The Spectrum of Data Science for Diagnosis of Osteoarthritis of the Temporomandibular Joint

Akbar Waljee

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I use machine-learning techniques to implement decision support systems and tools that facilitate more personalized care for disease management and healthcare utilization to ultimately deliver efficient, effective, and equitable therapy for chronic diseases. To test and advance these general principles, I have built operational programs that are guiding—and improving—patient care in costly in low resource settings, including emerging countries.

Kean Ming Tan

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I am an applied statistician working on statistical machine learning methods for analyzing complex biomedical data sets. I develop multivariate statistical methods such as probabilistic graphical models, cluster analysis, discriminant analysis, and dimension reduction to uncover patterns from massive data set. Recently, I also work on topics related to robust statistics, non-convex optimization, and data integration from multiple sources.

Nicole Seiberlich

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My research involves developing novel data collection strategies and image reconstruction techniques for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. In order to accelerate data collection, we take advantage of features of MRI data, including sparsity, spatiotemporal correlations, and adherence to underlying physics; each of these properties can be leveraged to reduce the amount of data required to generate an image and thus speed up imaging time. We also seek to understand what image information is essential for radiologists in order to optimize MRI data collection and personalize the imaging protocol for each patient. We deploy machine learning algorithms and optimization techniques in each of these projects. In some of our work, we can generate the data that we need to train and test our algorithms using numerical simulations. In other portions, we seek to utilize clinical images, prospectively collected MRI data, or MRI protocol information in order to refine our techniques.

We seek to develop technologies like cardiac Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (cMRF), which can be used to efficiently collect multiple forms of information to distinguish healthy and diseased tissue using MRI. By using rapid methods like cMRF, quantitative data describing disease processes can be gathered quickly, enabling more and sicker patients can be assessed via MRI. These data, collected from many patients over time, can also be used to further refine MRI technologies for the assessment of specific diseases in a tailored, patient-specific manner.