Zhongming Liu

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My research is at the intersection of neuroscience and artificial intelligence. My group uses neuroscience or brain-inspired principles to design models and algorithms for computer vision and language processing. In turn, we uses neural network models to test hypotheses in neuroscience and explain or predict human perception and behaviors. My group also develops and uses machine learning algorithms to improve the acquisition and analysis of medical images, including functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and magnetic resonance imaging of the gut.

We use brain-inspired neural networks models to predict and decode brain activity in humans processing information from naturalistic audiovisual stimuli.

Lucia Cevidanes

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We have developed and tested machine learning approaches to integrate quantitative markers for diagnosis and assessment of progression of TMJ OA, as well as extended the capabilities of 3D Slicer4 into web-based tools and disseminated open source image analysis tools. Our aims use data processing and in-depth analytics combined with learning using privileged information, integrated feature selection, and testing the performance of longitudinal risk predictors. Our long term goals are to improve diagnosis and risk prediction of TemporoMandibular Osteoarthritis in future multicenter studies.

The Spectrum of Data Science for Diagnosis of Osteoarthritis of the Temporomandibular Joint

Akbar Waljee

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I use machine-learning techniques to implement decision support systems and tools that facilitate more personalized care for disease management and healthcare utilization to ultimately deliver efficient, effective, and equitable therapy for chronic diseases. To test and advance these general principles, I have built operational programs that are guiding—and improving—patient care in costly in low resource settings, including emerging countries.

Kean Ming Tan

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I am an applied statistician working on statistical machine learning methods for analyzing complex biomedical data sets. I develop multivariate statistical methods such as probabilistic graphical models, cluster analysis, discriminant analysis, and dimension reduction to uncover patterns from massive data set. Recently, I also work on topics related to robust statistics, non-convex optimization, and data integration from multiple sources.

Nicole Seiberlich

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My research involves developing novel data collection strategies and image reconstruction techniques for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. In order to accelerate data collection, we take advantage of features of MRI data, including sparsity, spatiotemporal correlations, and adherence to underlying physics; each of these properties can be leveraged to reduce the amount of data required to generate an image and thus speed up imaging time. We also seek to understand what image information is essential for radiologists in order to optimize MRI data collection and personalize the imaging protocol for each patient. We deploy machine learning algorithms and optimization techniques in each of these projects. In some of our work, we can generate the data that we need to train and test our algorithms using numerical simulations. In other portions, we seek to utilize clinical images, prospectively collected MRI data, or MRI protocol information in order to refine our techniques.

We seek to develop technologies like cardiac Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (cMRF), which can be used to efficiently collect multiple forms of information to distinguish healthy and diseased tissue using MRI. By using rapid methods like cMRF, quantitative data describing disease processes can be gathered quickly, enabling more and sicker patients can be assessed via MRI. These data, collected from many patients over time, can also be used to further refine MRI technologies for the assessment of specific diseases in a tailored, patient-specific manner.

Xudong (Sherman) Fan

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We conduct research to analyze breath from patients in order to diagnose and monitor diseases.
We also develop imaging modalities to analyze tissues for cancer diagnosis

Prasad R. Shankar

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I am an assistant professor of Radiology and an clinical researcher in the division of abdominal radiology. I am the departmental Associate Chair for Quality and Safety and chair of our departmental quality/safety research group, the Michigan Radiology Quality Collaborative. I have strong clinical and research interests in prostate cancer diagnosis and testing-related quality of life. I am actively engaged in research efforts to optimize precision imaging selection, through the help of big data.

Jaerock Kwon

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My research interests are in the areas of brain-inspired machine intelligence and its applications such as mobile robots and autonomous vehicles. To achieve true machine intelligence, I have taken two different approaches: bottom-up data-driven and top-down theory-driven approach. For the bottom-up data-driven approach, I have investigated the neuronal structure of the brain to understand its function. The development of a high-throughput and high-resolution 3D tissue scanner was a keystone of this approach. This tissue scanner has a 3D virtual microscope that allows us to investigate the neuronal structure of a whole mammalian brain in a high resolution. The top-down theory-driven approach is to study what true machine intelligence is and how it can be implemented. True intelligence cannot be investigated without embracing the theory-driven approach such as self-awareness, embodiment, consciousness, and computational modeling. I have studied the internal dynamics of a neural system to investigate the self-awareness of a machine and model neural signal delay compensation. These two meet in the middle where machine intelligence is implemented for mechanical systems such as mobile robots and autonomous vehicles. I have a strong desire to bridge the bottom-up and top-down approaches that lead me to conduct research focusing on mobile robotics and autonomous vehicles to combine the data-driven and theory-driven approaches.

9.9.2020 MIDAS Faculty Research Pitch Video.

High-Throughput and High-Resolution Tissue Scanner – NSF Funded

Christopher E. Gillies

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I am Research Faculty with the Michigan Center for Integrative Research in Critical Care (MCIRCC). Our team builds predictive algorithms, analyzes signals, and implements statistical models to advance Critical Care Medicine. We use electronic healthcare record data to build predictive algorithms. One example of this is Predicting Intensive Care Transfers and other Unforeseen Events (PICTURE), which uses commonly collected vital signs and labs to predict patient deterioration on the general hospital floor. Additionally, our team collects waveforms from the University Hospital, and we store this data utilizing Amazon Web Services. We use these signals to build predictive algorithms to advance precision medicine. Our flagship algorithm called Analytic for Hemodynamic Instability (AHI), predicts patient deterioration using a single-lead electrocardiogram signal. We use Bayesian methods to analyze metabolomic biomarker data from blood and exhaled breath to understand Sepsis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. I also have an interest in statistical genetics.

Jeffrey Regier

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Jeffrey Regier received a PhD in statistics from UC Berkeley (2016) and joined the University of Michigan as an assistant professor. His research interests include graphical models, Bayesian inference, high-performance computing, deep learning, astronomy, and genomics.