Feng Zhou

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For human-machine systems, I first collect data from human users, whether it’s an individual, a team, or even a society. Different kinds of methods can be used, including self-report, interview, focus groups, physiological and behavioral data, as well as user-generated data from the Internet.

Based on the data collected, I attempt to understand human contexts, including different aspects of the human users, such as emotion, cognition, needs, preferences, locations and activities. Such understanding can then be applied to different human-machine systems, including healthcare systems, automated driving systems, and product-service systems.

Based on the different design theory and methodology, from the perspective of the machine dimension, I apply knowledge of computing and communication as well as practical and theoretical knowledge of social and behavior to design various systems for human users. From the human dimension, I seek to understand human needs and decision making processes, and then build mathematical models and design tools that facilitate integration of subjective experiences, social contexts, and engineering principles into the design process of human-machine systems.

Aditi Misra

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Transportation is the backbone of the urban mobility system and is one of the greatest sources of environmental emissions and pollutions. Making urban transportation efficient, equitable and sustainable is the main focus of my research. My students and I analyze small scale survey data as well as large scale spatiotemporal data to identify travel behavior trends and patterns at a disaggregate level using econometric methods, which we then scale up to the population level through predictive and statistical modeling. We also design our own data collection methods and instruments, be it a network of smart devices or stated preference experiments. Our expertise lies in identifying latent constructs that influence decisions and choices, which in turn dictate demands on the systems and subsystems. We use our expertise to design incentives and policy suggestions that can help promote sustainable and equitable multimodal transportation systems. Our team also uses data analytics, particularly classification and pattern recognition algorithms, to analyze crash context data and develop safety-critical scenarios for automated and connected vehicle (CAV) deployment. We have developed an online game based on such scenarios to promote safe shared mobility among teenagers and young adults and plan to expand research in that area. We are also currently expanding our research to explore the use of NN in context information synthesis.

This is a project where we used classification and Bayesian models to identify scenarios that are risky for pedestrians and bicyclists. We then developed an online game based on those scenarios for middle schoolers so that they are better prepared for shared road conflicts.

S. Sriram

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S. Sriram, PhD, is Professor of Marketing in the University of Michigan Ross School of Business, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Sriram’s research interests are in the areas of brand and product portfolio management, multi-sided platforms, healthcare policy, and online education. His research uses state of the art econometric methods to answer important managerial and policy-relevant questions. He has studied topics such as measuring and tracking brand equity and optimal allocation of resources to maintain long-term brand profitability, cannibalization, consumer adoption of technology products, and strategies for multi-sided platforms. Substantively, his research has spanned several industries including consumer packaged goods, technology products and services, retailing, news media, the interface of healthcare and marketing, and MOOCs.

Sandun Perera

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Professor Perera is Assistant Professor of Operations and Supply Chain Management in the School of Management at the University of Michigan, Flint

Professor Perera’s research broadly focuses on Supply Chain Management, Revenue Management, the Operations-Finance interface, the Operations-Marketing interface, Healthcare Operations Management and Financial Engineering. He is particularly interested in stochastic and deterministic inventory problems under general cost structures, government (central bank) operations in the foreign exchange market, consumer behavior under social learning, optimal delivery strategies for various supply chain networks, and asymmetric information in fads models. His recent research in healthcare operations management, revenue management, stochastic inventory management and financial engineering are mainly data and algorithm oriented.

Peter Lenk

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Prof. Lenk develops Bayesian models that disaggregate data to address individuals.  He also studies Bayesian nonparametric methods and currently consider shape constraints.  Prof. Lenk teaches and uses data mining methods such as recursive partition and neural networks.

Eric Schwartz

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Eric Schwartz, PhD, is Associate Professor of Marketing in the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan, An Arbor.

Prof. Schwartz’s expertise focuses on predicting customer behavior, understanding its drivers, and examining how firms actively manage their customer relationships through interactive marketing. His research in customer analytics stretches managerial applications, including online display advertising, email marketing, video consumption, and word-of-mouth. The quantitative methods he uses are primarily Bayesian statistics, machine learning, dynamic programming, and field experiments. His current projects aim to optimize firms’ A/B testing and adaptive marketing experiments using a multi-armed bandit framework. As marketers expand their ability to run tests of outbound marketing activity (e.g., sending emails/direct mail, serving display ads, customizing websites), this work guides marketers to be continuously “earning while learning.” While interacting with students and managers, Professor Schwartz works to illustrate how today’s marketers bridge the gap between technical skills and data-driven decision making.

Syagnik Banerjee

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Sy Banerjee studies the impact of mobile devices on consumer behavior and on the processing of signals emerging from location-based Social Media posts. He teaches a MBA class on digital marketing and Big Data and collaborates with researchers from Business, GIS and Computer Science. Some of his recent works include:

  • Assessing Prime-Time for Geotargeting With Mobile Big Data, Sy Banerjee, Vijay Viswanathan, Kalyan Raman, Hao Ying, Journal of Marketing Analytics, 2013, Vol. 1(3), pp 174-183.
  • “Visualizing active travel sentiment in an urban context” with Greg Rybarczyk, International Conference on Transport & Health MINETA Transportation Institute, San Jose, California, July 2016.
  • “Assigning Geo-Relevance of Sentiments Mined from Location-Based Social Media Posts” with R. Sanborn and M. Farmer, in Advances in Intelligent Data Analysis XIV, LNCS
  • “Understanding In-Store Consumer Experiences via User Generated Content from Social Media”, working paper with Karthik Sridhar and Ashwin Aravindakshan
  • “Tweeted Customer Emotions as Currency for Competitive Performance: A Framework of Location-Based Social Media Listening”, working paper with Amit Poddar, Karthik Sridhar, Nanda Kumar

9.9.2020 MIDAS Faculty Research Pitch Video.

Josh Pasek

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Josh Pasek is Assistant Professor of Communication Studies and Faculty Associate in the Center for Political Studies at the University of Michigan.  His substantive research explores how new media and psychological processes each shape political attitudes, public opinion, and political behaviors.  Josh also examines issues in the measurement of public opinion including techniques for incorporating social trace data as a means of tracking attitudes and behaviors.  Current research evaluates whether the use of online social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter might be changing the political information environment, and assesses the conditions under which nonprobability samples, such as those obtained from big data methods or samples of Internet volunteers can lead to conclusions similar to those of traditional probability samples.  His work has been published in Public Opinion Quarterly, Political Communication, Communication Research, and the Journal of Communication among other outlets.  He also maintains two R packages for producing survey weights (anesrake) and analyzing weighted survey data (weights).

Muzammil M. Hussain

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Muzammil M. Hussain is Assistant Professor of Communication and Media, Faculty Associate at the U-M International Institute and the U-M Institute for Social Research, and Faculty Affiliate at the U-M Ford School of Public Policy’s Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program (STPP) and the Michigan Institute for Data Science (MIDAS). Dr. Hussain’s interdisciplinary research is at the intersections of global communication, social analytics, and technology governance. At Michigan, Professor Hussain teaches courses on digital politics, research methods, and global innovation. He has authored numerous research articles, book chapters, and industry reports examining global ICT politics, innovation, and policy, including pieces in The Journal of Democracy, The Journal of International Affairs, The Brookings Institutions’ Issues in Technology and Innovation, The InterMedia Institute’s Development Research Series, International Studies Review, International Journal of Middle East Affairs, The Communication Review, Policy and Internet, and Journalism: Theory, Practice, and Criticism.