Sabine Loos

Sabine Loos

By |

My research focuses on natural hazards and disaster information, everything from understanding where disaster data comes from, how it’s used, and its implications to design improved disaster information systems that prioritize the human experience and lead to more effective and equitable outcomes.

My lab takes a user-centered and data-driven approach. We aim to understand user needs and the effect of data on users’ decisions through qualitative research, such as focus groups or workshops. We then design new information systems through geospatial/GIS analysis, risk analysis, and statistical modeling techniques. We often work with earth observation, sensor, and survey data. We consider various aspects of disaster information, whether it be the hazard, its physical impacts, its social impacts, or a combination of the three.

I also focus on the communication of information, through data visualization techniques, and host a Risk and Resilience DAT/Artathon to build data visualization capacity for early career professionals.

Geospatial model for predicting inequities in recovery from the 2015 Nepal earthquake

Photograph of Alison Davis Rabosky

Alison Davis Rabosky

By |

Our research group studies how and why an organism’s traits (“phenotypes”) evolve in natural populations. Explaining the mechanisms that generate and regulate patterns of phenotypic diversity is a major goal of evolutionary biology: why do we see rapid shifts to strikingly new and distinct character states, and how stable are these evolutionary transitions across space and time? To answer these questions, we generate and analyze high-throughput “big data” on both genomes and phenotypes across the 18,000 species of reptiles and amphibians across the globe. Then, we use the statistical tools of phylogenetic comparative analysis, geometric morphometrics of 3D anatomy generated from CT scans, and genome annotation and comparative transcriptomics to understand the integrated trait correlations that create complex phenotypes. Currently, we are using machine learning and neural networks to study the color patterns of animals vouchered into biodiversity collections and test hypotheses about the ecological causes and evolutionary consequences of phenotypic innovation. We are especially passionate about the effective and accurate visualization of large-scale multidimensional datasets, and we prioritize training in both best practices and new innovations in quantitative data display.

Picture of Besa Xhabija

Besa Xhabija

By |

Dr. Xhabija joined the Department of Natural Sciences in September 2022 as an Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. Her laboratory aims to understand the effects of toxins on early embryonic development utilizing embryonic stem cells because they provide a new tool and opportunity to investigate the impact of environmental exposures and their interactions with genetic factors on human development and health. To fully realize these potentials, she believes that it is important to understand the molecular basis of the defining characteristic of the stem cells. More specifically, she is interested in investigating how stem cells play a role in shaping the expression program during development and how mechanisms of self-renewal and differentiation during mammalian development regulate cellular fate decisions.

Jordan McKay

Jordan McKay

By |

He/Him

Jordan McKay is a Project Associate Manager at MIDAS. An Ann Arbor native, Jordan received his Bachelors in Computer Science from University of Michigan, and his Masters in Information at the University of Michigan School of Information. Outside of business hours, Jordan also works as a conductor, concert pianist, and Music Director with a number of organizations in the Ann Arbor area.

In addition to his duties administrating the day-to-day operations for MIDAS, its website, its events, and its part-time staff, Jordan is an engaged member of the data science community. Jordan is a determined advocate for ethical AI, data sovereignty, accessibility, digital privacy, and humane information system design, and is proud to be a member of a team that is working to make data a force for good in our society.

Negar Farzaneh

By |

Dr. Farzaneh’s research interest centers on the application of computer science, in particular, machine learning, signal processing, and computer vision, to develop clinical decision support systems and solve medical problems.

Trishul Kapoor

By |

Our research is focused on Post ICU pain syndromes (PIPS). PIPS exhibit distinct phenotypic presentations and can be predicted by intra-ICU parameters. Our primary goal is to be able to predict post-ICU opioid use based on intra-ICU parameters. We utilize a data-driven characterization of post-ICU pain syndromes will utilize unsupervised clustering algorithms including DBSCAN and spectral clustering. Prediction of post-discharge pain severity, likelihood of specific pain presentations, and post-discharge opioid use will be achieved using logistic LASSO, random forests, and neural networks. Specifically, these tests will utilize available ICU data to predict changes between pre-
and post-ICU pain severity, incidence of specific pain presentations, and incidence of opioid use.

This is a representation of enhancement of human cognition and clinical intelligence with artificial intelligence.

This is a representation of enhancement of human cognition and clinical intelligence with artificial intelligence.

Lubomir Hadjiyski

By |

Dr. Hadjiyski research interests include computer-aided diagnosis, artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, predictive models, image processing and analysis, medical imaging, and control systems. His current research involves design of decision support systems for detection and diagnosis of cancer in different organs and quantitative analysis of integrated multimodality radiomics, histopathology and molecular biomarkers for treatment response monitoring using AI and machine learning techniques. He also studies the effect of the decision support systems on the physicians’ clinical performance.

Yasser Aboelkassem

By |

In this project, we use multi-scale models coupled with machine learning algorithms to study cardiac electromechanic coupling. The approach spans out the molecular, Brownian, and Langevin dynamics of the contractile (sarcomeric proteins) mechanism of cardiac cells and up-to-the finite element analysis of the tissue and organ levels. In this work, a novel surrogate machine learning algorithm for the sarcomere contraction is developed. The model is trained and established using in-silico data-driven dynamic sampling procedures implemented using our previously derived myofilament mathematical models.

Multi-scale Machine Learning Modeling of Cardiac Electromechanics Coupling

Multi-scale Machine Learning Modeling of Cardiac Electromechanics Coupling

Yixin Wang

By |

Yixin Wang works in the fields of Bayesian statistics, machine learning, and causal inference, with applications to recommender systems, text data, and genetics. She also works on algorithmic fairness and reinforcement learning, often via connections to causality. Her research centers around developing practical and trustworthy machine learning algorithms for large datasets that can enhance scientific understandings and inform daily decision-making. Her research interests lie in the intersection of theory and applications.

Elle O’Brien

By |

My research focuses on building infrastructure for public health and health science research organizations to take advantage of cloud computing, strong software engineering practices, and MLOps (machine learning operations). By equipping biomedical research groups with tools that facilitate automation, better documentation, and portable code, we can improve the reproducibility and rigor of science while scaling up the kind of data collection and analysis possible.

Research topics include:
1. Open source software and cloud infrastructure for research,
2. Software development practices and conventions that work for academic units, like labs or research centers, and
3. The organizational factors that encourage best practices in reproducibility, data management, and transparency

The practice of science is a tug of war between competing incentives: the drive to do a lot fast, and the need to generate reproducible work. As data grows in size, code increases in complexity and the number of collaborators and institutions involved goes up, it becomes harder to preserve all the “artifacts” needed to understand and recreate your own work. Technical AND cultural solutions will be needed to keep data-centric research rigorous, shareable, and transparent to the broader scientific community.

View MIDAS Faculty Research Pitch, Fall 2021