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Christopher E. Gillies

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I am Research Faculty with the Michigan Center for Integrative Research in Critical Care (MCIRCC). Our team builds predictive algorithms, analyzes signals, and implements statistical models to advance Critical Care Medicine. We use electronic healthcare record data to build predictive algorithms. One example of this is Predicting Intensive Care Transfers and other Unforeseen Events (PICTURE), which uses commonly collected vital signs and labs to predict patient deterioration on the general hospital floor. Additionally, our team collects waveforms from the University Hospital, and we store this data utilizing Amazon Web Services. We use these signals to build predictive algorithms to advance precision medicine. Our flagship algorithm called Analytic for Hemodynamic Instability (AHI), predicts patient deterioration using a single-lead electrocardiogram signal. We use Bayesian methods to analyze metabolomic biomarker data from blood and exhaled breath to understand Sepsis and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. I also have an interest in statistical genetics.

Veera Baladandayuthapani

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Dr. Veera Baladandayuthapani is currently a Professor in the Department of Biostatistics at University of Michigan (UM), where he is also the Associate Director of the Center for Cancer Biostatistics. He joined UM in Fall 2018 after spending 13 years in the Department of Biostatistics at University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, where was a Professor and Institute Faculty Scholar and held adjunct appointments at Rice University, Texas A&M University and UT School of Public Health. His research interests are mainly in high-dimensional data modeling and Bayesian inference. This includes functional data analyses, Bayesian graphical models, Bayesian semi-/non-parametric models and Bayesian machine learning. These methods are motivated by large and complex datasets (a.k.a. Big Data) such as high-throughput genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics and proteomics as well as high-resolution neuro- and cancer- imaging. His work has been published in top statistical/biostatistical/bioinformatics and biomedical/oncology journals. He has also co-authored a book on Bayesian analysis of gene expression data. He currently holds multiple PI-level grants from NIH and NSF to develop innovative and advanced biostatistical and bioinformatics methods for big datasets in oncology. He has also served as the Director of the Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Cores for the Specialized Programs of Research Excellence (SPOREs) in Multiple Myeloma and Lung Cancer and Biostatistics&Bioinformatics platform leader for the Myeloma and Melanoma Moonshot Programs at MD Anderson. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He currently serves as an Associate Editor for Journal of American Statistical Association, Biometrics and Sankhya.

 

An example of horizontal (across cancers) and vertical (across multiple molecular platforms) data integration. Image from Ha et al (Nature Scientific Reports, 2018; https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-32682-x)

Nicholson Price

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I study how law shapes innovation in the life sciences, with a substantial focus on big data and artificial intelligence in medicine. I write about the intellectual property incentives and protections for data and AI algorithms, the privacy issues with wide-scale health- and health-related data collection, the medical malpractice implications of AI in medicine, and how FDA should regulate the use of medical AI.

Mousumi Banerjee

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My research is primarily focused around 1) machine learning methods for understanding healthcare delivery and outcomes in the population, 2) analyses of correlated data (e.g. longitudinal and clustered data), and 3) survival analysis and competing risks analyses. We have developed tree-based and ensemble regression methods for censored and multilevel data, combination classifiers using different types of learning methods, and methodology to identify representative trees from an ensemble. These methods have been applied to important areas of biomedicine, specifically in patient prognostication, in developing clinical decision-making tools, and in identifying complex interactions between patient, provider, and health systems for understanding variations in healthcare utilization and delivery. My substantive areas of research are cancer and pediatric cardiovascular disease.

S. Sriram

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S. Sriram, PhD, is Associate Professor of Marketing in the University of Michigan Ross School of Business, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Sriram’s research interests are in the areas of brand and product portfolio management, multi-sided platforms, healthcare policy, and online education. His research uses state of the art econometric methods to answer important managerial and policy-relevant questions. He has studied topics such as measuring and tracking brand equity and optimal allocation of resources to maintain long-term brand profitability, cannibalization, consumer adoption of technology products, and strategies for multi-sided platforms. Substantively, his research has spanned several industries including consumer packaged goods, technology products and services, retailing, news media, the interface of healthcare and marketing, and MOOCs.

Samuel K Handelman

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Samuel K Handelman, Ph.D., is Research Assistant Professor in the department of Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology, of Michigan Medicine at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Prof. Handelman is focused on multi-omics approaches to drive precision/personalized-therapy and to predict population-level differences in the effectiveness of interventions. He tends to favor regression-style and hierarchical-clustering approaches, partially because he has a background in both statistics and in cladistics. His scientific monomania is for compensatory mechanisms and trade-offs in evolution, but he has a principled reason to focus on translational medicine: real understanding of these mechanisms goes all the way into the clinic. Anything less that clinical translation indicates that we don’t understand what drove the genetics of human populations.

Antonios M. Koumpias

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Antonios M. Koumpias, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor of Economics in the department of Social Sciences at the University of Michigan, Dearborn. Prof. Koumpias is an applied microeconomist with research interests in public economics, with an emphasis on behavioral tax compliance, and health economics. In his research, he employs quasi-experimental methods to disentangle the causal impact of policy interventions that occur at the aggregate (e.g. states) or the individual (e.g. taxpayers) level in a comparative case study setting. Namely, he relies on regression discontinuity designs, regression kink designs, matching methods, and synthetic control methods to perform program evaluation that estimates the causal treatment effect of the policy in question. Examples include the use of a regression discontinuity design to estimate the impact of a tax compliance reminders on payments of overdue income tax liabilities in Greece, matching methods to measure the influence of mass media campaigns in Pakistan on income tax filing and the synthetic control method to evaluate the long-term effect of state Medicaid expansions on mortality.

Evolution of Annual Changes in All-cause Childless Adult Mortality in New York State following 2001 State Medicaid Expansion

Srijan Sen

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Srijan Sen, MD, PhD, is the Frances and Kenneth Eisenberg Professor of Depression and Neurosciences. Dr. Sen’s research focuses on the interactions between genes and the environment and their effect on stress, anxiety, and depression. He also has a particular interest in medical education, and leads a large multi-institution study that uses medical internship as a model of stress.

Romesh Saigal

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Professor Saigal has held faculty positions at the Haas School of Business, Berkeley and the department of Industrial Engineering and Management Sciences at Northwestern University, has been a researcher at the Bell Telephone Laboratories and numerous short term visiting positions. He currently teaches courses in Financial Engineering. In the recent past he taught courses in optimization, and Management Science. His current research involves data based studies of operational problems in the areas of Finance, Transportation, Renewable Energy and Healthcare, with an emphasis on the management and pricing of risks. This involves the use of data analytics, optimization, stochastic processes and financial engineering tools. His earlier research involved theoretical investigation into interior point methods, large scale optimization and software development for mathematical programming. He is an author of two books on optimization and large set of publications in top refereed journals. He has been an associate editor of Management Science and is a member of SIAM, AMS and AAAS. He has served as the Director of the interdisciplinary Financial Engineering Program and as the Director of Interdisciplinary Professional Programs (now Integrative Design + Systems) at the College of Engineering.

Michelle Aebersold

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Dr. Aebersold’s professional and academic career is focused on advancing the science of learning applied in simulation to align clinician and student practice behaviors with research evidence to improve learner and health outcomes.  She focuses her scholarship in both high fidelity and virtual reality simulation and is a national leader and expert in simulation. Her scholarship has culminated in developing the Simulation Model to Improve Learner and Health Outcomes (SMILHO).

Current Research Grants and Programs:

  • Closing the loop: new data tools for measuring change in the quality for nursing education and the value of new approaches to instruction (PI) University of Michigan School of Nursing.
  • Interactive anatomy-augmented virtual simulation training (PI with Voepel-Lewis) Archie MD Award Number 045889

Profile: Building a Better Nurse

By Dan Meisler
Communications Manager, ARC

Michelle Aebersold has spent her career trying to “build a better nurse,” through training development, virtual clinical environments, and patient simulations.

As Director of Simulation and Educational Innovation at the U-M School of Nursing, Aebersold is focused on creating realistic learning environments for nursing students.

But it wasn’t until relatively recently that she realized she had an under-utilized but powerful tool at her disposal — data.

For years, Aebersold has been collecting data on how student performance is affected by participation in various simulations, but it wasn’t until speaking to faculty from the Michigan Institute for Data Science (MIDAS) that she realized the potential insights all of her historical datasets might have hidden inside.

“We’re trying to pull them all together to create a common thread, so that as we collect data on our students, we can follow them to say how they progressed. How many simulations and what type of simulations did they get and how did that impact their learning?” Aebersold said. “We hit students with a lot of simulations while they’re in school, but we don’t necessarily know which ones are better for certain things.”

Now, as MIDAS core faculty member, Aebersold will be able to easily collaborate with other MIDAS researchers to refine and analyze her data.

Eventually, she said, she’d like to be able to track nursing students as they enter their first jobs to see how their training translates to real-world performance. And a further goal for Aebersold is to help the practice of nursing education become similar to the training world-class athletes receive, in which, for example, subjects review videos of their performance to identify what works and what doesn’t.

“We’re going to introduce some things, like what can we do with virtual simulations, or what can we do with eye-tracking,” she said. “We really want to try to dive deeper, by being able to put all this information together using a lot of these data science methods.”

Aebersold has been at U-M since the mid-1980s, serving in a variety of clinical and administrative roles. She earned a Ph.D in Nursing from the University in 2008, and served as Director of the Clinical Learning Center in the School of Nursing for eight years thereafter. Since 2016, she’s been Director of Simulation and Educational Innovation.

One of Aebersold’s recent projects, “Closing the Loop: New Data Tools for measuring Changes in the Quality of Nursing Education,” applies modern data-science tools to help understand the correlation between traditional tests and student skills and competence when they enter the workforce, and whether simulations coupled with debriefing sessions translate into improvements in skills and in test outcomes.

Another potential project will focus on comparing the eye movements of novice nurses to expert nurses. Aebersold said initial findings have shown that nurses with more experience tend to focus their eyes on one thing for longer periods of time than those with less.

She said she’s enlisting help on that work from professors in the School of Information at U-M.

“By really understanding the difference between how experts do things and novices do things, you can help develop simulations that help novices get better,” Aebersold said.

She credits her father with starting her on the path to becoming a nurse; he was a police officer, and would sometimes take her to the local emergency room.

“I loved the fast pace,” she recalled, and the chance to have a real, positive impact on people’s lives.

After earning a nursing degree from Madonna University, she became a critical care nurse. She then gravitated toward supervision and administration, gaining a masters in business administration, also from Madonna University. She earned her Ph.D. from U-M while working as a nurse manager at the U-M health System.

She said all the technology, data, and innovative modes of study she’s brought together are all in service of one goal.

“For me, it all comes down to how can we make the patient care environment safer for our patients,” she said.