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Yi Lu Murphey

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Dr. Yi Lu Murphey is an Associate Dean for Graduate Education and Research, a Professor of the ECE(Electrical and Computer Engineering) department and the director of the Intelligent Systems Lab at the University of Michigan, Dearborn. She received a M.S. degree in computer science from Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, in 1983, and a Ph.D degree with a major in Computer Engineering and a minor in Control Engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, in 1989. Her current research interests are in the areas of machine learning, pattern recognition, computer vision and intelligent systems with applications to automated and connected vehicles, optimal vehicle power management, data analytics, and robotic vision systems. She has authored over 130 publications in refereed journals and conference proceedings. She is an editor for the Journal of Pattern Recognition, a senior life member of AAAI and a fellow of IEEE.

Lu Wei

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Lu Wei, DSc,  is Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Michigan, Dearborn.

Prof. Wei studies the analytical properties of interacting particle systems relevant to both classical and quantum information theory.

 

Vijay Subramanian

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Professor Subramanian is interested in a variety of stochastic modeling, decision and control theoretic, and applied probability questions concerned with networks. Examples include analysis of random graphs, analysis of processes like cascades on random graphs, network economics, analysis of e-commerce systems, mean-field games, network games, telecommunication networks, load-balancing in large server farms, and information assimilation, aggregation and flow in networks especially with strategic users.

Laura Balzano

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Professor Balzano and her students investigate problems in statistical signal processing and optimization, particularly dealing with large and messy data. Her applications typically have missing, corrupted, and uncalibrated data as well as heterogeneous data in terms of sensors, sensor quality, and scale in both time and space. Her theoretical interests involve classes of non-convex problems that include Principal Components Analysis (or the Singular Value Decomposition) and many interesting variants such as PCA with sparse or structured principal components, orthogonality and non-negativity constraints, nonlinear variants such as low-dimensional algebraic variety models, and even categorical data or human preference data. She concentrates on fast gradient methods and related optimization methods that are scalable to real-time operation and massive data. Her work provides algorithmic and statistical guarantees for these algorithms on the aforementioned non-convex problems, and she focuses carefully on assumptions that are realistic for the relevant applications. She has worked in the areas of online algorithms, real-time computer vision, compressed sensing and matrix completion, network inference, and sensor networks.

Real-time dynamic background tracking and foreground separation. At time t = 101, the virtual camera slightly pans to right 20 pixels. We show how GRASTA quickly adapts to the new subspace by t = 125. The first row is the original video frame; the middle row is the tracked background; the bottom row is the separated foreground.

Real-time dynamic background tracking and foreground separation. At time t = 101, the virtual camera slightly pans to right 20 pixels. We show how GRASTA quickly adapts to the new subspace by t = 125. The first row is the original video frame; the middle row is the tracked background; the bottom row is the separated foreground.

Jerome P. Lynch

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Jerome P. Lynch, PhD, is Professor and Donald Malloure Department Chair of the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department in the College of Engineering in the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Lynch’s group works at the forefront of deploying large-scale sensor networks to the built environment for monitoring and control of civil infrastructure systems including bridges, roads, rail networks, and pipelines; this research portfolio falls within the broader class of cyber-physical systems (CPS). To maximize the benefit of the massive data sets, they collect from operational infrastructure systems, and undertake research in the area of relational and NoSQL database systems, cloud-based analytics, and data visualization technologies. In addition, their algorithmic work is focused on the use of statistical signal processing, pattern classification, machine learning, and model inversion/updating techniques to automate the interrogation sensor data collected. The ultimate aim of Prof. Lynch’s work is to harness the full potential of data science to provide system users with real-time, actionable information obtained from the raw sensor data collected.

A permanent wireless monitoring system was installed in 2011 on the New Carquinez Suspension Bridge (Vallejo, CA). The system continuously collects data pertaining to the bridge environment and the behavior of the bridge to load; our data science research is instrumental in unlocking the value of structural monitoring data through data-driven interrogation.

A permanent wireless monitoring system was installed in 2011 on the New Carquinez Suspension Bridge (Vallejo, CA). The system continuously collects data pertaining to the bridge environment and the behavior of the bridge to load; our data science research is instrumental in unlocking the value of structural monitoring data through data-driven interrogation.