Omar Jamil Ahmed

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The Ahmed lab studies behavioral neural circuits and attempts to repair them when they go awry in neurological disorders. Working with patients and with transgenic rodent models, we focus on how space, time and speed are encoded by the spatial navigation and memory circuits of the brain. We also focus on how these same circuits go wrong in Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and epilepsy. Our research involves the collection of massive volumes of neural data. Within these terabytes of data, we work to identify and understand irregular activity patterns at the sub-millisecond level. This requires us to leverage high performance computing environments, and to design custom algorithmic and analytical signal processing solutions. As part of our research, we also discover new ways for the brain to encode information (how neurons encode sequences of space and time, for example) – and the algorithms utilized by these natural neural networks can have important implications for the design of more effective artificial neural networks.

Xu Wang

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My research is to support more people learn in effective ways. I draw techniques and theories from Human-Computer Interaction, Learning Sciences, and Artificial Intelligence to develop computational methods and systems to support scalable teaching and learning. There are several directions in my research that draw on data science techniques and also contribute to interdisciplinary data science research, 1) data-driven authoring techniques of intelligent tutoring systems, with application domains in UX education and data science education 2) AI-augmented instructional design and the use Human-AI collaborative techniques in instructional design.

Michael Rubyan

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My research focuses on the development and evaluation of novel interventions that leverage emerging technologies to train members of the healthcare workforce around adhering to guidelines. I study how to scale custom designed teaching and learning platforms and evaluate their use to motivate effective communication and dissemination of evidence based practice. Other emphases of my work include health policy literacy, translation and communication of health services research, and improving health system literacy in urban communities. I have developed and evaluated numerous web based educational interventions that employ the “flipped classroom” design with an emphasis on understanding the data and analytics that guide successful implementation and promote high fidelity for members of the healthcare workforce. As an implementation scientist, I rely on the integration of data and analytics to understand what motivates successful program implementation.

In addition to the development of these platforms, I have extensive experience developing and evaluating online, hybrid residential, residential courses, and MOOCs related to healthcare management, non-profit management, healthcare finance, and health economics that employ engaging lessons and modules, interactive graphics, and a blended learning format to aid health professions students, and both undergraduate and graduate public health students in understanding the healthcare system. My MOOC entitled “Understanding and Improving the U.S. Health Care System” has been taken by over 5,000 learners and is characterized by the use of “big data” to understand how future healthcare providers learn health policy.

Allyson Flaster

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I manage research activities for the College and Beyond II study at ICPSR, including survey development and data infrastructure planning. My research broadly focuses on issues of postsecondary access and success for undergraduate and graduate students and uses quantitative methodologies.

Kevin Stange

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Prof. Stange’s research uses population administrative education and labor market data to understand, evaluate and improve education, employment, and economic policy. Much of the work involves analyzing millions of course-taking and transcript records for college students, whether they be at a single institution, a handful of institutions, or all institutions in several states. This data is used to richly characterize the experiences of college students and relate these experiences to outcomes such as educational attainment, employment, earnings, and career trajectories. Several projects also involve working with the text contained in the universe of all job ads posted online in the US for the past decade. This data is used to characterize the demand for different skills and education credentials in the US labor market. Classification is a task that is arising frequently in this work: How to classify courses into groups based on their title and content? How to identify students with similar educational experiences based on their course-taking patterns? How to classify job ads as being more appropriate for one type of college major or another? This data science work is often paired with traditional causal inference tools of economics, including quasi-experimental methods.

Sindhu Kutty

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My research centers on studying the interaction between abstract, theoretically sound probabilistic algorithms and human beings. One aspect of my research explores connections of Machine Learning to Crowdsourcing and Economics; focused in both cases on better understanding the aggregation process. As Machine Learning algorithms are used in making decisions that affect human lives, I am interested in evaluating the fairness of Machine Learning algorithms as well as exploring various paradigms of fairness. I study how these notions interact with more traditional performance metrics. My research in Computer Science Education focuses on developing and using evidence-based techniques in educating undergraduates in Machine Learning. To this end, I have developed a pilot summer program to introduce students to current Machine Learning research and enable them to make a more informed decision about what role they would like research to play in their future. I have also mentored (and continue to mentor) undergraduate students and work with students to produce publishable, and award-winning, undergraduate research.

Bogdan I. Epureanu

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• Computational dynamics focused on nonlinear dynamics and finite elements (e.g., a new approach for forecasting bifurcations/tipping points in aeroelastic and ecological systems, new finite element methods for thin walled beams that leads to novel reduced order models).
• Modeling nonlinear phenomena and mechano-chemical processes in molecular motor dynamics, such as motor proteins, toward early detection of neurodegenerative diseases.
• Computational methods for robotics, manufacturing, modeling multi-body dynamics, developed methods for identifying limit cycle oscillations in large-dimensional (fluid) systems.
• Turbomachinery and aeroelasticity providing a better understanding of fundamental complex fluid dynamics and cutting-edge models for predicting, identifying and characterizing the response of blisks and flade systems through integrated experimental & computational approaches.
• Structural health monitoring & sensing providing increased sensibility / capabilities by the discovery, characterization and exploitation of sensitivity vector fields, smart system interrogation through nonlinear feedback excitation, nonlinear minimal rank perturbation and system augmentation, pattern recognition for attractors, damage detection using bifurcation morphing.

Barbara Jane Ericson

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I have been creating free and interactive ebooks for introductory computing courses on the open-source Ruenstone platform and analyzing the clickstream data from those courses to improve the ebooks and instruction. In particular, I am interested in using educational data mining to close the feedback loop and improve the instructional materials. I am also interested in learner sourcing to automatically generate and improve assessments. I have been applying principles from educational psychology such as worked examples plus low cognitive load practice to improve instruction. I have been exploring mixed-up code (Parsons) problems as one type of practice. I created two types of adaptation for Parsons problems: intra-problem and inter-problem. In intra-problem adaptation, if the learner is struggling to solve the current problem it can dynamically be made easier. In inter-problem adaptation the difficulty of the next problem is based on the learner’s performance on the previous problem.

Quan Nguyen

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My research focuses on the application of data science in educational research, so called learning analytics. I have experience analyzing educational data on a large-scale to understand a) how course design influence students’ learning behavior and b) how students form peer networks. My work involves using multiple educational data sources such as log-data in online learning environment, course information, students’ academic records, and location data gathered from campus WiFi networks. I am interested in network analysis, time-series analysis, and machine learning.

Ron Eglash

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Societal control tends to be implemented from the top-down, whether that is a private corporation or a communist state. How can data science empower from the bottom-up? Computational technologies can be designed to replace extractive economies with generative cycles. My research includes AI for the artisanal economy; computational modeling of Indigenous practices; and other means for putting the power of data science in the service of generative justice.

Student moving from her knowledge of braiding algorithms, to her program for braiding patterns, to a mannequin head for installation in adult braider’s shops. https://csdt.org/culture/cornrowcurves/index.html