Zhongming Liu

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My research is at the intersection of neuroscience and artificial intelligence. My group uses neuroscience or brain-inspired principles to design models and algorithms for computer vision and language processing. In turn, we uses neural network models to test hypotheses in neuroscience and explain or predict human perception and behaviors. My group also develops and uses machine learning algorithms to improve the acquisition and analysis of medical images, including functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and magnetic resonance imaging of the gut.

We use brain-inspired neural networks models to predict and decode brain activity in humans processing information from naturalistic audiovisual stimuli.

Jaerock Kwon

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My research interests are in the areas of brain-inspired machine intelligence and its applications such as mobile robots and autonomous vehicles. To achieve true machine intelligence, I have taken two different approaches: bottom-up data-driven and top-down theory-driven approach. For the bottom-up data-driven approach, I have investigated the neuronal structure of the brain to understand its function. The development of a high-throughput and high-resolution 3D tissue scanner was a keystone of this approach. This tissue scanner has a 3D virtual microscope that allows us to investigate the neuronal structure of a whole mammalian brain in a high resolution. The top-down theory-driven approach is to study what true machine intelligence is and how it can be implemented. True intelligence cannot be investigated without embracing the theory-driven approach such as self-awareness, embodiment, consciousness, and computational modeling. I have studied the internal dynamics of a neural system to investigate the self-awareness of a machine and model neural signal delay compensation. These two meet in the middle where machine intelligence is implemented for mechanical systems such as mobile robots and autonomous vehicles. I have a strong desire to bridge the bottom-up and top-down approaches that lead me to conduct research focusing on mobile robotics and autonomous vehicles to combine the data-driven and theory-driven approaches.

9.9.2020 MIDAS Faculty Research Pitch Video.

High-Throughput and High-Resolution Tissue Scanner – NSF Funded

Kentaro Toyama

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Kentaro Toyama is W. K. Kellogg Professor of Community Information at the University of Michigan School of Information and a fellow of the Dalai Lama Center for Ethics and Transformative Values at MIT. He is the author of “Geek Heresy: Rescuing Social Change from the Cult of Technology.” Toyama conducts interdisciplinary research to understand how the world’s low-income communities interact with digital technology and to invent new ways for technology to support their socio-economic development, including computer simulations of complex systems for policy-making. Previously, Toyama did research in artificial intelligence, computer vision, and human-computer interaction at Microsoft and taught mathematics at Ashesi University in Ghana.

Interacting with children at a Seva Mandir school in Rajasthan, India.

Jin Lu

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Dr. Jin Lu is an Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Science at the University of Michigan, Dearborn.
His major research interests include machine learning, data mining, optimization, matrix analysis, biomedical informatics, and health informatics. Two main directions are being pursued:
(1) Large-scale machine learning problems with data heterogeneity. Data heterogeneity is common across many high-impact application domains, ranging from recommendation system to Computer Vision, Bioinformatics and Health-informatics. Such heterogeneity can be present in a variety of forms, including (a) sample heterogeneity, where multiple resources of data samples are available as side information; (b) task heterogeneity, where multiple related learning tasks can be jointly learned to improve the overall performance; (c) view heterogeneity, where complementary information is available from various sources. My research interests focus on building efficient machine learning methods from such data heterogeneity, aiming to improve the learning model by making the best use of all data resources.
(2) Machine learning methods with provable guarantees. Machine learning has been substantially developed and has demonstrated great success in various domains. Despite its practical success, many of the applications involve solving NP-hard problems based on heuristics. It is challenging to analyze whether a heuristic scheme has any theoretical guarantee. My research interest is to employ granular data structure, e.g. sample clusters or features describing an aspect of the sample, to design new theoretically-sound models and algorithms for machine learning problems.

David Fouhey

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David works on computer vision and machine learning with the end goal of developing autonomous systems that can learn to build representations of the underlying state and dynamics of the world through observation (and potentially interaction).

Towards this end, he is particularly interested in understanding physical and functional properties from images. His research interest in physical properties aims to address how we can recover a rich 3D world from a 2D image. He is especially interested in representations — the answers that are obvious are also obviously defective — as well as how we should reconcile our strong prior knowledge about this structure of the problem with data-driven techniques. In recent work, he has become interested in applying this more broadly in the hope that we can develop AI systems that can learn how the physical world works from observation, including work on solar physics. In functional properties, he is interested in inferring and understanding opportunities for interaction with the environment by both robots and humans, both in terms of how one would learn this and what this implies for a physical understanding of the world.

Harm Derksen

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Current research includes a project funded by Toyota that uses Markov Models and Machine Learning to predict heart arrhythmia, an NSF-funded project to detect Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) from x-ray images and projects using tensor analysis on health care data (funded by the Department of Defense and National Science Foundation).

Yi Lu Murphey

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Dr. Yi Lu Murphey is an Associate Dean for Graduate Education and Research, a Professor of the ECE(Electrical and Computer Engineering) department and the director of the Intelligent Systems Lab at the University of Michigan, Dearborn. She received a M.S. degree in computer science from Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, in 1983, and a Ph.D degree with a major in Computer Engineering and a minor in Control Engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, in 1989. Her current research interests are in the areas of machine learning, pattern recognition, computer vision and intelligent systems with applications to automated and connected vehicles, optimal vehicle power management, data analytics, and robotic vision systems. She has authored over 130 publications in refereed journals and conference proceedings. She is an editor for the Journal of Pattern Recognition, a senior life member of AAAI and a fellow of IEEE.

Jason Corso

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The Corso group’s main research thrust is high-level computer vision and its relationship to human language, robotics and data science. They primarily focus on problems in video understanding such as video segmentation, activity recognition, and video-to-text; methodology, models leveraging cross-model cues to learn structured embeddings from large-scale data sources as well as graphical models emphasizing structured prediction over large-scale data sources are their emphasis. From biomedicine to recreational video, imaging data is ubiquitous. Yet, imaging scientists and intelligence analysts are without an adequate language and set of tools to fully tap the information-rich image and video. His group works to provide such a language.  His long-term goal is a comprehensive and robust methodology of automatically mining, quantifying, and generalizing information in large sets of projective and volumetric images and video to facilitate intelligent computational and robotic agents that can natural interact with humans and within the natural world.

Relating visual content to natural language requires models at multiple scales and emphases; here we model low-level visual content, high-level ontological information, and these two are glued together with an adaptive graphical structure at the mid-level.

Relating visual content to natural language requires models at multiple scales and emphases; here we model low-level visual content, high-level ontological information, and these two are glued together with an adaptive graphical structure at the mid-level.

Luis E. Ortiz

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Luis Ortiz, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Science, College of Engineering and Computer Science, The University of Michigan, Dearborn

The study of large complex systems of structured strategic interaction, such as economic, social, biological, financial, or large computer networks, provides substantial opportunities for fundamental computational and scientific contributions. Luis’ research focuses on problems emerging from the study of systems involving the interaction of a large number of “entities,” which is my way of abstractly and generally capturing individuals, institutions, corporations, biological organisms, or even the individual chemical components of which they are made (e.g., proteins and DNA). Current technology has facilitated the collection and public availability of vasts amounts of data, particularly capturing system behavior at fine levels of granularity. In Luis’ group, they study behavioral data of strategic nature at big data levels. One of their main objectives is to develop computational tools for data science, and in particular learning large-population models from such big sources of behavioral data that we can later use to study, analyze, predict and alter future system behavior at a variety of scales, and thus improve the overall efficiency of real-world complex systems (e.g., the smart grid, social and political networks, independent security and defense systems, and microfinance markets, to name a few).

Jie Shen

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One of my research interests is in the digital diagnosis of material damage based on sensors, computational science and numerical analysis with large-scale 3D computed tomography data: (1) Establishment of a multi-resolution transformation rule of material defects. (2) Design of an accurate digital diagnosis method for material damage. (3) Reconstruction of defects in material domains from X-ray CT data . (4) Parallel computation of materials damage. My team also conducted a series of studies for improving the quality of large-scale laser scanning data in reverse engineering and industrial inspection: (1) Detection and removal of non-isolated Outlier Data Clusters (2) Accurate correction of surface data noise of polygonal meshes (3) Denoising of two-dimensional geometric discontinuities.

Another research focus is on the information fusion of large-scale data from autonomous driving. Our research is funded by China Natural Science Foundation with focus on (1) laser-based perception in degraded visual environment, (2) 3D pattern recognition with dynamic, incomplete, noisy point clouds, (3) real-time image processing algorithms in degraded visual environment, and (4) brain-computer interface to predict the state of drivers.

Processing and Analysis of 3D Large-Scale Engineering Data

Processing and Analysis of 3D Large-Scale Engineering Data