Ron Eglash

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Societal control tends to be implemented from the top-down, whether that is a private corporation or a communist state. How can data science empower from the bottom-up? Computational technologies can be designed to replace extractive economies with generative cycles. My research includes AI for the artisanal economy; computational modeling of Indigenous practices; and other means for putting the power of data science in the service of generative justice.

Student moving from her knowledge of braiding algorithms, to her program for braiding patterns, to a mannequin head for installation in adult braider’s shops. https://csdt.org/culture/cornrowcurves/index.html

Deanna Isaman

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My applied research focuses on simulation models of the progression of multiple chronic complications and comorbidities of diabetes and its precursors. I study the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of early interventions in the progression of diabetes. My methodological research synthesizes secondary data from complementary studies to model complex processes.

Anna G. Stefanopoulou

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Energy Transportation related topics: data and simulations of various cleaner and ultimately cost-effective options for transit. exploring techno-economic and environmental issues in electric ride-sharing/hailing vehicles to create clean and convenient alternatives to single-occupancy vehicles. investigation of the location and integration of chargers with energy storage and bi-directional services, along with the connection to distributed renewable power generation such as solar arrays as well as the centralized electric grid.

Powertrain related topics: measurements, models and management of batteries, fuel cells, and engines in automotive and stationary applications.

Aditi Misra

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Transportation is the backbone of the urban mobility system and is one of the greatest sources of environmental emissions and pollutions. Making urban transportation efficient, equitable and sustainable is the main focus of my research. My students and I analyze small scale survey data as well as large scale spatiotemporal data to identify travel behavior trends and patterns at a disaggregate level using econometric methods, which we then scale up to the population level through predictive and statistical modeling. We also design our own data collection methods and instruments, be it a network of smart devices or stated preference experiments. Our expertise lies in identifying latent constructs that influence decisions and choices, which in turn dictate demands on the systems and subsystems. We use our expertise to design incentives and policy suggestions that can help promote sustainable and equitable multimodal transportation systems. Our team also uses data analytics, particularly classification and pattern recognition algorithms, to analyze crash context data and develop safety-critical scenarios for automated and connected vehicle (CAV) deployment. We have developed an online game based on such scenarios to promote safe shared mobility among teenagers and young adults and plan to expand research in that area. We are also currently expanding our research to explore the use of NN in context information synthesis.

This is a project where we used classification and Bayesian models to identify scenarios that are risky for pedestrians and bicyclists. We then developed an online game based on those scenarios for middle schoolers so that they are better prepared for shared road conflicts.

Kentaro Toyama

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Kentaro Toyama is W. K. Kellogg Professor of Community Information at the University of Michigan School of Information and a fellow of the Dalai Lama Center for Ethics and Transformative Values at MIT. He is the author of “Geek Heresy: Rescuing Social Change from the Cult of Technology.” Toyama conducts interdisciplinary research to understand how the world’s low-income communities interact with digital technology and to invent new ways for technology to support their socio-economic development, including computer simulations of complex systems for policy-making. Previously, Toyama did research in artificial intelligence, computer vision, and human-computer interaction at Microsoft and taught mathematics at Ashesi University in Ghana.

Interacting with children at a Seva Mandir school in Rajasthan, India.

Neil Carter

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Carter’s research combines quantitative, theoretical, and field approaches to address challenging local to global wildlife conservation issues in the Anthropocene. His work includes projects on endangered species conservation in human-dominated areas of Nepal, post-war recovery of wildlife in Mozambique, human-wildlife coexistence in the American West, and the effects of artificial lights and human-made noise on wildlife habitat across the contiguous US. Research methods focus on: (1) spatializing both human and wildlife processes, (2) probabilistic methods to infer human-wildlife interactions (3) simulation models of coupled natural-human systems, and (4) forecasting and decision-support tools.

Yulin Pan

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My research is mainly concerned with theoretical and computational hydrodynamics, with applications in nonlinear ocean wave prediction and dynamics, wave-body interactions, and wave turbulence theory. I have incorporated the data science tools in my research, especially in the following two projects:

1. Quantification of statistics of extreme ship motions in irregular wave fields: In this project, we propose a new computational framework that directly resolves the statistics (and causal factors) of extreme ship responses in a nonlinear wave field. The development leverages a range of physics and learning based approaches, including nonlinear wave simulations (potential flow), ship response simulations (e.g., CFD), dimension-reduction techniques, sequential sampling, Gaussian process regression (Kriging) and multi-fidelity methods. The key features of the new approach include (i) description of the stochastic wave field by a low-dimensional probabilistic parameter space, and (ii) use of minimum number of CFD simulations to provide most information for converged statistics of extreme motions.

2. Real-time wave prediction with data assimilation from radar measurements: In this project, we develop the real-time data assimilation algorithm adapted to the CPU-GPU hardware architecture, to reduce the uncertainties associated with radar measurement errors and environmental factors such as wind and current in the realistic ocean environment. Upon integration with advanced in-situ or remote wave sensing technology, the developed computational framework can provide heretofore unavailable real-time forecast capability for ocean waves.

Aaron A. King

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The long temporal and large spatial scales of ecological systems make controlled experimentation difficult and the amassing of informative data challenging and expensive. The resulting sparsity and noise are major impediments to scientific progress in ecology, which therefore depends on efficient use of data. In this context, it has in recent years been recognized that the onetime playthings of theoretical ecologists, mathematical models of ecological processes, are no longer exclusively the stuff of thought experiments, but have great utility in the context of causal inference. Specifically, because they embody scientific questions about ecological processes in sharpest form—making precise, quantitative, testable predictions—the rigorous confrontation of process-based models with data accelerates the development of ecological understanding. This is the central premise of my research program and the common thread of the work that goes on in my laboratory.

Ho-Joon Lee

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Dr. Lee’s research in data science concerns biological questions in systems biology and network medicine by developing algorithms and models through a combination of statistical/machine learning, information theory, and network theory applied to multi-dimensional large-scale data. His projects have covered genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics from yeast to mouse to human for integrative analysis of regulatory networks on multiple molecular levels, which also incorporates large-scale public databases such as GO for functional annotation, PDB for molecular structures, and PubChem and LINCS for drugs or small compounds. He previously carried out proteomics and metabolomics along with a computational derivation of dynamic protein complexes for IL-3 activation and cell cycle in murine pro-B cells (Lee et al., Cell Reports 2017), for which he developed integrative analytical tools using diverse approaches from machine learning and network theory. His ongoing interests in methodology include machine/deep learning and topological Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy-based network theory, which are applied to (1) multi-level dynamic regulatory networks in immune response, cell cycle, and cancer metabolism and (2) mass spectrometry-based omics data analysis.

Figure 1. Proteomics and metabolomics analysis of IL-3 activation and cell cycle (Lee et al., Cell Reports 2017). (A) Multi-omics abundance profiles of proteins, modules/complexes, intracellular metabolites, and extracellular metabolites over one cell cycle (from left to right columns) in response to IL-3 activation. Red for proteins/modules/intracellular metabolites up-regulation or extracellular metabolites release; Green for proteins/modules/intracellular metabolites down-regulation or extracellular metabolites uptake. (B) Functional module network identified from integrative analysis. Red nodes are proteins and white nodes are functional modules. Expression profile plots are shown for literature-validated functional modules. (C) Overall pathway map of IL-3 activation and cell cycle phenotypes. (D) IL-3 activation and cell cycle as a cancer model along with candidate protein and metabolite biomarkers. (E) Protein co-expression scale-free network. (F) Power-low degree distribution of the network E. (G) Protein entropy distribution by topological Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy calculated for the network E.

 

Samuel K Handelman

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Samuel K Handelman, Ph.D., is Research Assistant Professor in the department of Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology, of Michigan Medicine at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Prof. Handelman is focused on multi-omics approaches to drive precision/personalized-therapy and to predict population-level differences in the effectiveness of interventions. He tends to favor regression-style and hierarchical-clustering approaches, partially because he has a background in both statistics and in cladistics. His scientific monomania is for compensatory mechanisms and trade-offs in evolution, but he has a principled reason to focus on translational medicine: real understanding of these mechanisms goes all the way into the clinic. Anything less that clinical translation indicates that we don’t understand what drove the genetics of human populations.