Joshua Stein

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As a board-certified ophthalmologist and glaucoma specialist, I have more than 15 years of clinical experience caring for patients with different types and complexities of glaucoma. In addition to my clinical experience, as a health services researcher, I have developed experience and expertise in several disciplines including performing analyses using large health care claims databases to study utilization and outcomes of patients with ocular diseases, racial and other disparities in eye care, associations between systemic conditions or medication use and ocular diseases. I have learned the nuances of various data sources and ways to maximize our use of these data sources to answer important and timely questions. Leveraging my background in HSR with new skills in bioinformatics and precision medicine, over the past 2-3 years I have been developing and growing the Sight Outcomes Research Collaborative (SOURCE) repository, a powerful tool that researchers can tap into to study patients with ocular diseases. My team and I have spent countless hours devising ways of extracting electronic health record data from Clarity, cleaning and de-identifying the data, and making it linkable to ocular diagnostic test data (OCT, HVF, biometry) and non-clinical data. Now that we have successfully developed such a resource here at Kellogg, I am now collaborating with colleagues at > 2 dozen academic ophthalmology departments across the country to assist them with extracting their data in the same format and sending it to Kellogg so that we can pool the data and make it accessible to researchers at all of the participating centers for research and quality improvement studies. I am also actively exploring ways to integrate data from SOURCE into deep learning and artificial intelligence algorithms, making use of SOURCE data for genotype-phenotype association studies and development of polygenic risk scores for common ocular diseases, capturing patient-reported outcome data for the majority of eye care recipients, enhancing visualization of the data on easy-to-access dashboards to aid in quality improvement initiatives, and making use of the data to enhance quality of care, safety, efficiency of care delivery, and to improve clinical operations. .

Akbar Waljee

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I use machine-learning techniques to implement decision support systems and tools that facilitate more personalized care for disease management and healthcare utilization to ultimately deliver efficient, effective, and equitable therapy for chronic diseases. To test and advance these general principles, I have built operational programs that are guiding—and improving—patient care in costly in low resource settings, including emerging countries.

Robert Ploutz-Snyder

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My work falls into three general application areas. I am an applied (accredited) biostatistician with a strong team science motivation and I collaborate with scientists in primarily the biomedical sciences, contributing expertise in experimental design, statistical analysis/modeling, and data visualization. I have held faculty appointments in Schools of Medicine and Nursing, and also worked as a senior scientist in the Human Research Program at the NASA Johnson Space Center. I currently direct an Applied Biostatistics Laboratory and Data Management Core within the UM School of Nursing, and maintain several collaborative research programs within the School, at NASA, and with collaborators elsewhere.

Keith Aaronson, MD

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Dr. Aaronson is actively engaged in clinical practice and clinical research in the areas of heart failure, heart transplantation and mechanical circulatory support. His research has focused on improving health, quality of life and economic outcomes in these populations, utilizing methodologies ranging from small to large scale observational analyses, Markov modeling, meta-analyses, and both industry-sponsored and investigator-initiated randomized clinical trials of standard pharmaceutical interventions, alternative medicines, patient education and mechanical circulatory support. Dr. Aaronson has had a particular interest in modeling outcomes in advanced heart failure, heart transplantation and mechanical circulatory support to inform appropriate utilization of health resources.

Vitaliy Popov

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My research focuses on understanding, designing, and evaluating learning technologies and environments that foster collaborative problem solving, spatial reasoning, engineering design thinking and agency. I am particularly interested in applying multimodal learning analytics in the context of co-located and/or virtually distributed teams in clinical simulations. I strive to utilize evidence in education science, simulation-based training and learning analytics to understand how people become expert health professionals, how they can better work in teams and how we can support these processes to foster health care delivery and health outcomes.

Nicole Seiberlich

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My research involves developing novel data collection strategies and image reconstruction techniques for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. In order to accelerate data collection, we take advantage of features of MRI data, including sparsity, spatiotemporal correlations, and adherence to underlying physics; each of these properties can be leveraged to reduce the amount of data required to generate an image and thus speed up imaging time. We also seek to understand what image information is essential for radiologists in order to optimize MRI data collection and personalize the imaging protocol for each patient. We deploy machine learning algorithms and optimization techniques in each of these projects. In some of our work, we can generate the data that we need to train and test our algorithms using numerical simulations. In other portions, we seek to utilize clinical images, prospectively collected MRI data, or MRI protocol information in order to refine our techniques.

We seek to develop technologies like cardiac Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (cMRF), which can be used to efficiently collect multiple forms of information to distinguish healthy and diseased tissue using MRI. By using rapid methods like cMRF, quantitative data describing disease processes can be gathered quickly, enabling more and sicker patients can be assessed via MRI. These data, collected from many patients over time, can also be used to further refine MRI technologies for the assessment of specific diseases in a tailored, patient-specific manner.

Kathleen Sienko

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Age- and sensory-related deficits in balance function drastically impact quality of life and present long-term care challenges. Successful fall prevention programs include balance exercise regimes, designed to recover, retrain, or develop new sensorimotor strategies to facilitate functional mobility. Effective balance-training programs require frequent visits to the clinic and/or the supervision of a physical therapist; however, one-on-one guided training with a physical therapist is not scalable for long-term balance training preventative and therapeutic programs. To enable preventative and therapeutic at-home balance training, we aim to develop models for automatically 1) evaluating balance and, 2) delivering personalized training guidance for community dwelling OA and people with sensory disabilities.

Smart Phone Balance Trainer

Veera Baladandayuthapani

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Dr. Veera Baladandayuthapani is currently a Professor in the Department of Biostatistics at University of Michigan (UM), where he is also the Associate Director of the Center for Cancer Biostatistics. He joined UM in Fall 2018 after spending 13 years in the Department of Biostatistics at University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, where was a Professor and Institute Faculty Scholar and held adjunct appointments at Rice University, Texas A&M University and UT School of Public Health. His research interests are mainly in high-dimensional data modeling and Bayesian inference. This includes functional data analyses, Bayesian graphical models, Bayesian semi-/non-parametric models and Bayesian machine learning. These methods are motivated by large and complex datasets (a.k.a. Big Data) such as high-throughput genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics and proteomics as well as high-resolution neuro- and cancer- imaging. His work has been published in top statistical/biostatistical/bioinformatics and biomedical/oncology journals. He has also co-authored a book on Bayesian analysis of gene expression data. He currently holds multiple PI-level grants from NIH and NSF to develop innovative and advanced biostatistical and bioinformatics methods for big datasets in oncology. He has also served as the Director of the Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Cores for the Specialized Programs of Research Excellence (SPOREs) in Multiple Myeloma and Lung Cancer and Biostatistics&Bioinformatics platform leader for the Myeloma and Melanoma Moonshot Programs at MD Anderson. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He currently serves as an Associate Editor for Journal of American Statistical Association, Biometrics and Sankhya.

 

An example of horizontal (across cancers) and vertical (across multiple molecular platforms) data integration. Image from Ha et al (Nature Scientific Reports, 2018; https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-32682-x)

Mousumi Banerjee

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My research is primarily focused around 1) machine learning methods for understanding healthcare delivery and outcomes in the population, 2) analyses of correlated data (e.g. longitudinal and clustered data), and 3) survival analysis and competing risks analyses. We have developed tree-based and ensemble regression methods for censored and multilevel data, combination classifiers using different types of learning methods, and methodology to identify representative trees from an ensemble. These methods have been applied to important areas of biomedicine, specifically in patient prognostication, in developing clinical decision-making tools, and in identifying complex interactions between patient, provider, and health systems for understanding variations in healthcare utilization and delivery. My substantive areas of research are cancer and pediatric cardiovascular disease.

Srijan Sen

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Srijan Sen, MD, PhD, is the Frances and Kenneth Eisenberg Professor of Depression and Neurosciences. Dr. Sen’s research focuses on the interactions between genes and the environment and their effect on stress, anxiety, and depression. He also has a particular interest in medical education, and leads a large multi-institution study that uses medical internship as a model of stress.