Emanuel Gull

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Professor Gull works in the general area of computational condensed matter physics with a focus on the study of correlated electronic systems in and out of equilibrium. He is an expert on Monte Carlo methods for quantum systems and one of the developers of the diagrammatic ‘continuous-time’ quantum Monte Carlo methods. His recent work includes the study of the Hubbard model using large cluster dynamical mean field methods, the development of vertex function methods for optical (Raman and optical conductivity) probes, and the development of bold line diagrammatic algorithms for quantum impurities out of equilibrium. Professor Gull is involved in the development of open source computer programs for strongly correlated systems.

Quantum impurities are small confined quantum systems coupled to wide leads. An externally applied time-dependent magnetic field induces a change in the population of spins on the impurity, leading to time-dependent switching behavior. The system's equations of motion are determined by a many-body quantum field theory and solved using a diagrammatic Monte Carlo approach. The computations were performed at Columbia University and the University of Michigan.

Quantum impurities are small confined quantum systems coupled to wide leads. An externally applied time-dependent magnetic field induces a change in the population of spins on the impurity, leading to time-dependent switching behavior. The system’s equations of motion are determined by a many-body quantum field theory and solved using a diagrammatic Monte Carlo approach. The computations were performed at Columbia University and the University of Michigan.

Jieping Ye

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Jieping Ye, PhD, is Associate Professor of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics in the Medical School at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

The Ye Lab has been conducting fundamental research in machine learning and data mining, developing computational methods for biomedical data analysis, and building informatics software. We have developed novel machine learning algorithms for feature extraction from high-dimensional data, sparse learning, multi-task learning, transfer learning, active learning, multi-label classification, and matrix completion. We have developed the SLEP (Sparse Learning with Efficient Projections) package, which includes implementations of large-scale sparse learning models, and the MALSAR (Multi-tAsk Learning via StructurAl Regularization) package, which includes implementations of state-of-the-art multi-task learning models. SLEP achieves state-of-the-art performance for many sparse learning models, and it has become one of the most popular sparse learning software packages. With close collaboration with researchers at the biomedical field, we have successfully applied these methods for analyzing biomedical data, including clinical image data and genotype data.

Peter X. K. Song

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Peter Song, PhD, is Professor of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Dr. Song is interested in methodological developments related to modelling, statistical inference and applications in biomedical sciences.  One of his current research areas concerns the development of statistical methodology and algorithm for fusion learning and homogeneity pursuit in data integration to address various analytic challenges from data heterogeneity.  Another focus of his current research is on the regression analysis of networked data, with applications to electroencephalogram data analysis for the understanding of human growth and development.

Judy Jin

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Judy Jin, PhD, is Professor of Industrial and Operations Engineering in the College of Engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Prof. Jin’s research focuses on the development of new data fusion methodologies for improving system operation and quality with the emphasis on fusion of data and engineering knowledge collected from disparate sources by integrating multidisciplinary methods. Her research has been widely applied in both manufacturing and service industry by providing techniques for knowledge discovery and risk-informed decision making. Key research issues are being pursued:

  1. Advanced quality control methodologies for system monitoring, diagnosis and control with temporally and spatially dense operational/sensing data.
  2. Multi-scale data transform and high order tensor data analysis for modeling, analysis, classification, and making inferences of multistream sensing signals.
  3. Optimal sensor distribution and hierarchical variable selection methods for system abnormal detection and sensor fusion decisions, which integrates the causal probability network model, statistical change detection, set-covering algorithm, and hierarchical lasso regression.
  4. A unified approach for variation reduction in multistage manufacturing processes (MMPs) using a state space model, which blend the control theory with advanced statistics for MMPs sensing, monitoring, diagnosis and control, integrative design of process tolerance and maintenance policy considering the interaction between product quality and tool reliability.

Data science applications: (a) Smart manufacturing with sensor fusion, process monitoring, diagnosis and control (e.g., metal forming including stamping, forging, casting and rolling), assembly, ultrasonic welding, photovoltaic thin film deposition. (b) Travel time estimation and traffic prediction for intelligent transportation systems. (c) Multi-stream data analysis of human motion/vehicle crash testing data for improving vehicle design and safety. (d) Risk informed decision support for healthcare and clinical decisions. (e) Customer behavior modeling for fraud detection in healthcare and telecommunication. (f) Human decision-making behavior modeling in a dynamic/emergency environment.

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Long Nguyen

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I am broadly interested in statistical inference, which is informally defined as the process of turning data into prediction and understanding. I like to work with richly structured data, such as those extracted from texts, images and other spatiotemporal signals. In recent years I have gravitated toward a field in statistics known as Bayesian nonparametrics, which provides a fertile and powerful mathematical framework for the development of many computational and statistical modeling ideas. My motivation for all this came originally from an early interest in machine learning, which continues to be a major source of research interest. A primary focus of my group’s research in machine learning to develop more effective inference algorithms using stochastic, variational and geometric viewpoints.